The Concordance
 
 A......................557
RomA 12 A jape, or elles nycete, 12
RomA 14 Let whoso lyste a fol me calle. 14
RomA 26 Me mette such a swevenyng 26
RomA 28 But in that sweven is never a del 28
RomA 64 That it wole have a newe shroud, 64
RomA 97 A sylvre nedle forth I drough 96
RomA 104 With a thred bastyng my slevis, 104
RomA 110 Toward a ryver gan I me dresse 110
RomA 135 And whan I had a while goon, 134
RomA 136 I saugh a gardyn right anoon, 136
RomA 149 Semede to ben a mynoresse, 148
RomA 150 An angry wight, a chideresse; 150
RomA 154 But lyk a wod womman afraied. 154
RomA 161 Ful grymly with a greet towayle. 160
RomA 163 A lyft half was hir faste by. 162
RomA 171 She semede a wikked creature. 170
RomA 186 Leneth to many a creature 186
RomA 224 A mantyl heng hir faste by, 224
RomA 225 Upon a perche, weik and small; 224
RomA 226 A burnet cote heng therwithall 226
RomA 228 But with a furre rough of her, 228
RomA 232 Ne hastith hir never a dell. 232
RomA 240 A purs that heng by a band, 240
RomA 240 A purs that heng by a band, 240
RomA 246 That fro that purs a peny wente. 246
RomA 260 And if a man in honour rise, 260
RomA 290 Hadde a wondirful lokyng, 290
RomA 293 And she hadde a [foul] usage: 292
RomA 321 A sorowful thyng wel semed she, 320
RomA 336 So wo-begon a thyng was she. 336
RomA 350 That shorter was a foot, iwys, 350
RomA 361 A foul, forwelked thyng was she, 360
RomA 368 A foot, but it were by potente. 368
RomA 402 More than a child of two yeer old. 402
RomA 407 And was a doted thing bicomen. 406
RomA 408 A furred cope on had she nomen; 408
RomA 417 Ne spareth never a wikked dede, 416
RomA 421 And semeth a simple creature; 420
RomA 431 A sauter held she fast in honde, 430
RomA 433 To make many a feynt praiere 432
RomA 446 To gete hem prys in toun a while; 446
RomA 447 And for a litel glorie veine 446
RomA 451 That not a peny hadde in wolde, 450
RomA 454 For nakid as a worm was she. 454
RomA 457 She nadde on but a streit old sak, 456
RomA 458 And many a clout on it ther stak: 458
RomA 460 No more was there, never a dell, 460
RomA 492 So riche a yer[d] was never noon 492
RomA 510 I fel fast in a weymentynge 510
RomA 524 Or hole, into so faire a place. 524
RomA 525 Tho gan I go a full gret pas 524
RomA 528 Tyl that I fond a wiket small 528
RomA 538 A mayden curteys openyde me. 538
RomA 541 Hir flesh tendre as is a chike, 540
RomA 546 Hir yen grey as is a faucoun, 546
RomA 550 A clove chynne eke hadde she. 550
RomA 555 Ther nys a fairer nekke, iwys, 554
RomA 561 A fairer body for to seke. 560
RomA 563 A chapelet so semly oon 562
RomA 566 A rose gerland had she sett. 566
RomA 567 She hadde [in honde] a gay mirrour, 566
RomA 568 And with a riche gold tressour 568
RomA 572 Of gloves white she had a paire. 572
RomA 573 And she hadde on a cote of grene 572
RomA 581 She ladde a lusty lyf in May: 580
RomA 612 As thou hast seen a while agoo. 612
RomA 639 A fair and joly companye 638
RomA 650 It semede a place espirituel, 650
RomA 655 For there was many a bridd syngyng, 654
RomA 722 These briddis syngyng on a rowe, 722
RomA 730 Doun by a lytel path I fond 730
RomA 744 Upon a karole wenten thoo. 744
RomA 745 A lady karolede hem that hyghte 744
RomA 761 And made many a fair tournyng 760
RomA 769 There was many a tymbestere, 768
RomA 774 Upon a fynger fair and softe, 774
RomA 795 A lady gan me for to espie, 794
RomA 805 I was abasshed never a dell, 804
RomA 818 A fairer man I nevere sigh. 818
RomA 825 His shuldris of a large brede, 824
RomA 827 He semed lyk a portreiture, 826
RomA 841 In many a place, lowe and hie. 840
RomA 845 His leef a rosyn chapelet 844
RomA 856 She semed lyk a rose newe 856
RomA 858 That with a brere smale and slendre 858
RomA 870 I, which seyen have a thousand, 870
RomA 875 Of which hir leef a robe werde 874
RomA 905 And many a rose-leef ful long 904
RomA 908 Of roses reed a chapelett, 906
RomA 909 But nyghtyngales, a ful gret route, 908
RomA 918 Love hadde with hym a bacheler 916
RomA 924 That oon of hem was of a tree 922
RomA 925 That bereth a fruyt of savour wykke; 924
RomA 929 That other bowe was of a plante 928
RomA 950 Out of a bowe for to dryve, 948
RomA 965 Yit can it make a ful gret wounde. 964
RomA 1004 Ladde on his hond a lady bright, 1002
RomA 1025 A ful gret savour and a swote 1024
RomA 1025 A ful gret savour and a swote 1024
RomA 1029 In world is noon so fair a wight, 1028
RomA 1042 To helpe and eke to greve a wyght. 1040
RomA 1050 Hir court hath many a losenger, 1048
RomA 1051 And many a traytour envyous, 1050
RomA 1062 Ful many a worthy man and wys, 1060
RomA 1071 Richesse a robe of purpur on hadde 1070
RomA 1074 Ne by a thousand deell so riche, 1072
RomA 1079 And with a bend of gold tasseled, 1078
RomA 1085 Rychesse a girdell hadde upon, 1084
RomA 1086 The bokel of it was of a stoon 1084
RomA 1092 And tyl a riche mannes byhove 1090
RomA 1095 Was of a stoon full precious, 1094
RomA 1097 That hol a man it koude make 1096
RomA 1099 And yit the stoon hadde such a grace 1098
RomA 1104 Upon a tyssu of satyn, 1102
RomA 1106 In everich was a besaunt-wight. 1104
RomA 1108 Was sette a cercle, for noblesse, 1106
RomA 1114 It is a wondir thing to here, 1112
RomA 1120 A fyn charboncle set saugh I. 1118
RomA 1124 A myle or two in lengthe and brede. 1122
RomA 1130 A yong man ful of semelyhede, 1128
RomA 1148 As it were poured in a garner. 1146
RomA 1171 A full gret fool is he, ywys, 1170
RomA 1173 A lord may have no maner vice 1172
RomA 1187 Largesse hadde on a robe fresh 1186
RomA 1192 Unto a lady maad present 1190
RomA 1193 Of a gold broche, ful wel wrought. 1192
RomA 1198 Hild by the hond a knyght of prys, 1196
RomA 1210 He caste doun many a doughty man. 1208
RomA 1223 And if a man were in distresse, 1222
RomA 1227 For were a man for hir bistad, 1226
RomA 1231 Hir thought it elles a vylanye. 1230
RomA 1232 And she hadde on a sukkenye, 1230
RomA 1236 Ther nas [nat] a poynt, trewely, 1234
RomA 1241 A womman wel more fetys is 1240
RomA 1246 Bi hir daunced a bacheler. 1244
RomA 1267 And by hir wente a knyght dauncyng, 1266
RomA 1271 And in armure a semely man, 1270
RomA 1291 In sich a gise that he hir kyste 1290
RomA 1296 They were ashamed never a dell, 1294
RomA 1319 A, Lord, they lyved lustyly! 1318
RomA 1320 A gret fool were he, sikirly, 1318
RomA 1326 As to have a love at his devys. 1324
RomA 1336 And at a braid he gan it bende, 1334
RomA 1345 Wente up and doun full many a wey, 1344
RomA 1356 Of pome-garnettys a full gret dell; 1354
RomA 1357 That is a fruyt full well to lyke, 1356
RomA 1364 Fyges, and many a date-tree 1362
RomA 1367 Ther was eke wexyng many a spice, 1366
RomA 1371 And many a spice delitable 1370
RomA 1386 And othere trees full many a payre. 1384
RomA 1407 And maden many a tourneying 1406
RomA 1416 Gan make a noyse ful lykyng. 1414
RomA 1422 As on a fetherbed to pleye, 1420
RomA 1428 That th' erthe was of such a grace 1426
RomA 1437 With many a fressh and sondri flour, 1436
RomA 1456 Besydes a wel, under a tree, 1454
RomA 1456 Besydes a wel, under a tree, 1454
RomA 1457 Which tree in Fraunce men cal a pyn. 1456
RomA 1462 And springyng in a marble ston 1460
RomA 1464 Under that pyn-tree a welle. 1462
RomA 1469 Narcisus was a bacheler 1468
RomA 1474 For a fayr lady that hight Echo 1472
RomA 1477 That on a tyme she him tolde 1476
RomA 1493 Myght on a day ben hampred so 1492
RomA 1504 A day whanne he com fro huntyng. 1502
RomA 1516 To drynken of that welle a draughte. 1514
RomA 1522 Of a child of gret beaute. 1520
RomA 1536 And diede withynne a lytel space. 1534
RomA 1571 That ye wole holde a gret mervayle 1568
RomA 1585 Ryght as a myrrour openly 1582
RomA 1628 Of which ther hath ful many a wight 1626
RomA 1638 A thousand thinges faste by. 1636
RomA 1650 Among a thousand thinges mo, 1648
RomA 1651 A roser chargid full of rosis, 1648
RomA 1658 That caught hath many a man and shent, 1656
RomA 1667 To pulle a rose of all that route 1664
RomA 1682 Ben passed in a day or two, 1680
RomB 1718 Was stondyng by a fige-tree. 1716
RomB 1740 Of blood have loren a full gret dell. 1738
RomB 1754 Al bledde I not a drope of blod. 1752
RomB 1758 Ne gete a leche my woundis to; 1756
RomB 1771 And Love hadde gete hym, in a throwe, 1768
RomB 1780 Into myn herte hath maad a wounde. 1778
RomB 1830 Feble as a forwoundid man, 1828
RomB 1857 But whanne a while I hadde be thar, 1854
RomB 1875 Yf me a martir wolde he make, 1872
RomB 1889 With a precious oynement, 1886
RomB 1896 Made in myn herte a large sore, 1892
RomB 1935 He is a fool in sikernesse, 1932
RomB 1988 For though a man fer wolde seche, 1984
RomB 1991 For sich a word ne myghte nought 1988
RomB 1992 Isse out of a vilayns thought. 1988
RomB 2016 So good a maister to have as me, 2012
RomB 2036 And gaf hym thankes many a oon, 2032
RomB 2080 Ye may therof do make a keye, 2076
RomB 2088 A litell keye, fetys ynowgh, 2084
RomB 2135 " A sire, for Goddis love, " seide I, 2132
RomB 2161 For a reder that poyntith ille 2158
RomB 2162 A good sentence may ofte spille. 2158
RomB 2182 And by his dedis a cherl is seyn. 2178
RomB 2197 As longeth to a gentilman; 2194
RomB 2200 A cherl is demed by his dede 2196
RomB 2258 A man amendith in myche thyng. 2254
RomB 2266 Loke at the leest thou have a paire, 2262
RomB 2288 A beaute that cometh not of kynde. 2284
RomB 2316 Pursue til thou a name hast wonne. 2312
RomB 2331 Resoun wole that a lover be 2328
RomB 2337 For he that thorough a sodeyn sight, 2334
RomB 2338 Or for a kyssyng, anoonright 2334
RomB 2350 A man to kepe, whanne it is breve. 2346
RomB 2374 I holde it but a wrecchid thyng; 2370
RomB 2380 Requyrith a gret guerdonyng. 2376
RomB 2409 Domm as a ston, without steryng 2406
RomB 2419 " After, a thought shal take the so, 2416
RomB 2435 A fool myself I may wel holde, 2432
RomB 2444 Thanne fallest thou in a newe rage; 2440
RomB 2458 Atteyne of hire to have a sight, 2454
RomB 2471 The peyne of love, unto a fer; 2468
RomB 2511 A sight of hir for to have, 2508
RomB 2541 For they in herte cunne thenke a thyng, 2538
RomB 2554 A thousand angres shall come uppon. 2550
RomB 2565 Thanne shall thee come a remembraunce 2562
RomB 2586 Twenty tymes upon a day 2582
RomB 2591 A, Lord! Why nyl ye me socoure 2588
RomB 2600 Allas, to gret a thing aske I! 2596
RomB 2602 To aske so outrageous a thyng; 2598
RomB 2611 It were to me a gret guerdoun, 2608
RomB 2621 A lok on hir I caste goodly, 2618
RomB 2624 A, Lord! Wher I shall byde the day 2620
RomB 2627 A, God! Whanne shal the dawnyng spring? 2624
RomB 2631 A man to lyen hath gret disese, 2628
RomB 2636 A, slowe sonne, shewe thin enprise! 2632
RomB 2718 A lovere shall do me servise. 2714
RomB 2734 Myght lyve a month, such peynes to fele. " 2730
RomB 2738 A man loveth more tendirly 2734
RomB 2742 For which a man hath suffred sore. 2738
RomB 2746 No more than a man [may] counte 2742
RomB 2806 To make a mirrour of his mynde; 2802
RomB 2828 And holpe many a bachiler, 2824
RomB 2829 And many a lady sent socour, 2826
RomB 2840 Ther was a lady fresh of hewe, 2836
RomB 2841 Which of hir love made a song 2838
RomB 2857 A felowe that can well concele, 2854
RomB 2888 To have a man thou darst say 2884
RomB 2892 Whanne such a freend thou hast assayed. 2888
RomB 2903 For to aswage a mannes sorowe, 2900
RomB 2905 For it is a full noble thing, 2902
RomB 2919 The eye is a good messanger, 2916
RomB 2924 That a gret party of his woo 2920
RomB 2981 I saw come with a glad cher 2978
RomB 2982 To me, a lusty bacheler, 2978
RomB 3015 But thanne a cherl (foule hym bityde!) 3012
RomB 3030 On many a just man doth he wreke. 3026
RomB 3031 Ther was a womman eke that hight 3028
RomB 3040 But Resoun conceyveth of a sighte 3036
RomB 3077 A leef all grene, and yaff me that, 3074
RomB 3117 A mochel fool thanne I were, 3114
RomB 3142 Thou worchist in a wrong maner. 3138
RomB 3146 Who serveth a feloun is yvel quit. 3142
RomB 3184 A quarter of my woo and peyn. 3180
RomB 3189 A long while stod I in that stat, 3184
RomB 3198 But best as it were in a mene. 3194
RomB 3201 And on hir heed she hadde a crowne. 3196
RomB 3207 For Nature hadde nevere such a grace, 3202
RomB 3208 To forge a werk of such compace. 3204
RomB 3240 And though a yong man in ony wise 3236
RomB 3259 For er a thing be do, he shall, 3254
RomB 3264 Of falsnesse, for to seyne a tale. 3260
RomB 3274 His scole he lesith, if he be a clerk. 3270
RomB 3292 Whanne thou were brought in sich a rage 3288
RomB 3320 That he it sparrede with a keye. 3316
RomB 3336 Forwery, forwandred as a fool, 3332
RomB 3340 A felowe to whom I myghte seye 3336
RomB 3344 Hadde a felowe faste by, 3340
RomB 3346 And he was called by name a Freend -- 3342
RomB 3347 A trewer felowe was nowher noon. 3342
RomB 3375 A feloun first though that he be, 3370
RomB 3401 And in his hond a gret burdoun. 3396
RomB 3426 A thyng that may not warned be, 3422
RomB 3464 A man may overcome ofte 3460
RomB 3491 That Love me ladde in sich a wise 3486
RomB 3530 Or on youre man a werre make, 3526
RomB 3598 Wherfore a sorouful man is he. 3594
RomB 3634 To sene it was a goodly thyng. 3630
RomB 3640 It was theron a goodly syght; 3636
RomB 3653 That he me wolde graunt a thyng, 3648
RomB 3658 To have a kyssynge precious 3654
RomB 3663 Have a cos therof freely, 3658
RomB 3684 A man shulde nat to moche assay 3680
RomB 3706 Of brennyng fyr a blasyng brond, 3702
RomB 3708 Hath many a lady in desir 3704
RomB 3725 And to hym shortly, in a clause, 3720
RomB 3729 To graunte hym nothyng but a kis? 3724
RomB 3746 Graunte hym a kis, of gentilnysse! 3742
RomB 3750 To graunte that a kis have he. 3746
RomB 3766 It is fair sich a flour to kisse, 3762
RomB 3774 That with a litel wynde it nille 3770
RomB 3839 And faste loken in a tour, 3834
RomB 3864 Weryng a vayle in stide of wymple, 3860
RomB 3867 She gan to speke withynne a throwe 3862
RomB 3874 On Bialacoil a fals lesyng. 3870
RomB 3942 To make anoon a forteresse, 3938
RomB 3944 In myddis shall I make a tour 3940
RomB 3955 A fool is eythe to bigyle; 3950
RomB 3956 But may I lyve a litel while, 3952
RomB 3962 That not a word durste he say, 3958
RomB 3975 Whanne onys sprongen is a fame. 3970
RomB 3976 For many a yeer withouten blame 3972
RomB 3977 We han ben, and many a day; 3972
RomB 3978 For many an Aprill and many a May 3974
RomB 4004 But in the stede a trusse of gras. 4000
RomB 4005 He slombred, and a nappe he tok, 4000
RomB 4030 A cherl chaungeth that curteis is. 4026
RomB 4033 Make a sperhauk of a bosard. 4028
RomB 4033 Make a sperhauk of a bosard. 4028
RomB 4054 Enclose hym in a sturdy wall; 4050
RomB 4083 Perced to be with many a wounde, 4078
RomB 4092 And hente a burdoun in his hond. 4088
RomB 4098 That no man myghte touche a rose 4094
RomB 4112 Full ofte a day sen and biholde. 4108
RomB 4134 With many a turnyng to and froo, 4130
RomB 4143 On me he leieth a pitous charge, 4138
RomB 4150 He hirede hem to make a tour. 4146
RomB 4152 Aboute hem made he a diche deep, 4148
RomB 4155 Of squared stoon a sturdy wall, 4150
RomB 4156 Which on a cragge was founded all; 4152
RomB 4164 Ful many a riche and fair touret. 4160
RomB 4166 Was set a tour full pryncipall; 4162
RomB 4168 A porte-colys defensable 4164
RomB 4172 Was maad a tour of gret maistrise; 4168
RomB 4173 A fairer saugh no man with sight, 4168
RomB 4186 Aboute the tour was maad a wall, 4182
RomB 4227 For with a puff of litell wynd 4222
RomB 4231 A foulis flight wol make hir flee, 4226
RomB 4232 And eke a shadowe, if she it see. 4228
RomB 4256 Unto hir husbonde a trewe wyf, 4252
RomB 4260 A man speken of leccherie. 4256
RomB 4264 Another hath a likerous ye; 4260
RomB 4266 Another is a chideresse. 4262
RomB 4278 That hath maad a tour so round, 4274
RomB 4279 And made aboute a garisoun, 4274
RomB 4322 I wende a bought it all queyntly; 4318
RomB 4325 And me a newe bargeyn leere, 4320
RomB 4336 May falle a weder that shal it dere, 4332
RomB 4343 Ben me byraft all with a storm; 4338
RomB 4358 For [in] a twynklyng turneth hir wheel. 4354
RomB 4364 A fool is he that wole hir trust; 4360
RomB 4377 A, Bialacoil, myn owne deer! 4372
RomB 4378 Though thou be now a prisoner, 4374
RomB 4389 A trewe herte wole not plie 4384
RomB 4417 A, Bialacoil, full wel I see 4412
RomB 4449 A, that is a full noyous thyng! 4444
RomB 4449 A, that is a full noyous thyng! 4444
RomB 4450 For many a lover, in lovyng, 4446
RomB 4457 A full good silogisme, I dreede 4452
RomB 4478 They doon a gret contrarie. 4474
RomB 4495 A rympled vekke, fer ronne in age, 4490
RomB 4498 That noon of him may have a sight. 4494
RomB 4520 Out of so strong a forteresse? 4516
RomB 4531 A foolis word is nought to trowe, 4526
RomB 4535 I was a fool, and she me leeved, 4530
RomB 4540 A fool mysilf I may well calle, 4536
RomB 4548 A fals traitour thanne shulde I be. 4544
RomB 4617 And I not where to fynde a leche 4612
RomB 4639 " Thou servest a full noble lord, 4634
RomB 4648 Thou didist a gret foly than, 4644
RomB 4654 Thou noldist serve hym half a yeer, 4650
RomB 4655 Not a weke, nor half a day, 4650
RomB 4655 Not a weke, nor half a day, 4650
RomB 4668 Raisoun " Lo, there a noble conisaunce! 4664
RomB 4688 A thyng that is not demonstrable. 4684
RomB 4704 A free acquitaunce, withoute relees, 4700
RomB 4705 A trouthe, fret full of falsheede, 4700
RomB 4706 A sikernesse all set in drede. 4702
RomB 4707 In herte is a dispeiryng hope, 4702
RomB 4710 A swete perell in to droun; 4706
RomB 4712 A wikked wawe, awey to were. 4708
RomB 4722 A thurst drowned in dronknesse, 4718
RomB 4726 And a gredy suffisaunce; 4722
RomB 4733 A peyne also it is, joious, 4728
RomB 4737 A strengthe, weyked to stonde upright, 4732
RomB 4741 A laughter it is, weping ay; 4736
RomB 4743 Also a swete helle it is, 4738
RomB 4744 And a soroufull paradys; 4740
RomB 4745 A pleasant gayl and esy prisoun, 4740
RomB 4751 It is a slowe, may not forbere 4746
RomB 4810 It is a syknesse of the thought 4806
RomB 4830 Sich love I preise not at a lek. 4826
RomB 4835 With many a lesyng and many a fable, 4830
RomB 4835 With many a lesyng and many a fable, 4830
RomB 4852 To geten a likly thyng hym til, 4848
RomB 4863 To use that werk on such a wise 4858
RomB 4869 For noon wolde drawe therof a draught, 4864
RomB 4884 In a bok he made `Of Age,' 4878
RomB 4911 Though for a tyme his herte absente, 4906
RomB 4946 Hou it hem brought in many a rage, 4940
RomB 4947 And many a foly therynne wrought. 4942
RomB 4969 Of many a perelous emprise, 4964
RomB 5040 They wole it holde a gret myschaunce; 5034
RomB 5053 For litel shulde a man telle 5048
RomB 5058 He is a wrecche, I undirtake, 5052
RomB 5069 [Ne] may a jewel or other thyng 5064
RomB 5106 A sory gest, in goode fay, 5100
RomB 5128 Certeyn I holde it but a gras. 5122
RomB 5139 And yitt ne seide she never a del 5134
RomB 5165 From me, [and] [ben] a synfull wrecche 5160
RomB 5176 He were a fool, wolde you not trowe! 5170
RomB 5185 Raisoun " Certis, freend, a fool art thou, 5180
RomB 5197 And bringith thee in many a fit, 5192
RomB 5241 A good man brenneth in his thought 5236
RomB 5250 And founde hym stedefast as a wall, 5244
RomB 5261 Repreve he dredeth never a deel, 5256
RomB 5266 A fooles belle is soone runge. 5260
RomB 5267 Yit shal a trewe freend do more 5262
RomB 5286 Spak Tulius in a ditee: 5280
RomB 5373 For if he be a nygard ek, 5368
RomB 5374 Men wole not sette by hym a lek, 5368
RomB 5384 Nomore than is a goot ramage. 5378
RomB 5391 And til a wikked deth hym take. 5386
RomB 5405 A wondir will Y telle thee now, 5400
RomB 5417 For lyche a moder she can cherish, 5412
RomB 5418 And mylken as doth a norys, 5412
RomB 5423 In a stat that is not stable, 5418
RomB 5452 And han therof a rejoysyng, 5446
RomB 5460 Nor of a thousand full scarsly, 5454
RomB 5473 As a stepmoder envyous, 5468
RomB 5474 And leieth a plastre dolorous 5468
RomB 5534 Among a thousand that fyndith oon. 5528
RomB 5576 Sith that it makith hym a wise man, 5570
RomB 5650 In a book that `The Golden Verses' 5644
RomB 5657 He is a fool, withouten were, 5652
RomB 5671 A wise man seide, as we may seen, 5666
RomB 5674 And many a ribaud is mery and baud, 5668
RomB 5676 Many a burthen of gret myght, 5670
RomB 5699 His herte in sich a were is sett 5694
RomB 5709 He undirfongith a gret peyne, 5704
RomB 5726 That if a man falle in siknesse, 5720
RomB 5730 And though they die, they sette not a lek. 5724
RomB 5760 For prechyng of a cursed man, 5754
RomB 5762 Hymsilf it availeth not a myte; 5756
RomC 5822 Ne smyte a strok in this bataile, 5816
RomC 5842 That he hath geten a peny or two 5836
RomC 5894 She hath tan many a forteresse, 5888
RomC 5895 That cost hath many a pound, er this, 5890
RomC 5903 " Go bye a courser, blak or whit, 5898
RomC 5983 If I may grype a riche man, 5978
RomC 5985 That he shal in a fewe stoundes 5980
RomC 6036 Though ye you medle never a del. 6030
RomC 6070 Certeyn, thou art a fals traitour, 6064
RomC 6071 And eke a theef; sith thou were born, 6066
RomC 6072 A thousand tyme thou art forsworn. 6066
RomC 6114 " They made a full good engendryng, " 6108
RomC 6169 Than lete a purpos that I take, 6164
RomC 6187 That [hath. a foul conclusioun. 6182
RomC 6188 `I have a robe of religioun, 6182
RomC 6191 It is not worth a croked brere. 6186
RomC 6200 That he dar sey a word therto. 6194
RomC 6228 Shulde lede a wikked lyf, parfey, 6222
RomC 6234 Full many a seynt in feeld and toun, 6228
RomC 6235 With many a virgine glorious, 6228
RomC 6239 I cowde reken you many a ten; 6232
RomC 6243 That baren full many a fair child heere, 6236
RomC 6259 " Whoso took a wethers skyn, 6252
RomC 6260 And wrapped a gredy wolf theryn, 6254
RomC 6307 Forsothe, I am a fals traitour; 6300
RomC 6308 God jugged me for a theef trichour. 6302
RomC 6342 In many a queynte array feyned. 6334
RomC 6345 Somtyme a wommans cloth take I; 6338
RomC 6346 Now am I a mayde, now lady. 6338
RomC 6350 And now a nonne, and now abbesse; 6342
RomC 6370 Now is not this a propre thing? 6362
RomC 6374 For I dide hem a tregetry. 6366
RomC 6380 That I lede right a joly lyf, 6372
RomC 6385 Onys a yeer, as seith the book, 6376
RomC 6400 Ne be not rebel never a del. 6392
RomC 6406 Thou shalt not streyne me a del, 6398
RomC 6464 I yeve not of her harm a bene! 6456
RomC 6468 I shal yeve hem a strok or two, 6460
RomC 6479 Telle forth, and shame thee never a del; 6470
RomC 6488 As shulde a maister of dyvyn; 6480
RomC 6493 Than of a pore man of mylde mod, 6484
RomC 6507 But a riche sik usurer 6498
RomC 6522 Hath a soule in right gret poverte 6514
RomC 6531 As it is knowe to many a wight, 6522
RomC 6535 For if a riche man hym dresse 6526
RomC 6541 Unnethe that he nys a mycher 6532
RomC 6559 That, parde, they myght aske a thing 6550
RomC 6573 A myghty man, that can and may, 6564
RomC 6576 If he ne have rent or sich a thing, 6568
RomC 6587 A parfit man ne shulde seke 6578
RomC 6602 He is a trechour, ful of fable; 6594
RomC 6635 I wole not entremete a del; 6626
RomC 6645 And if ye such a truaunt fynde, 6636
RomC 6671 For in this world is many a man 6662
RomC 6685 " Telle me thanne how a man may lyven, 6676
RomC 6691 Seynt Austyn seith a man may be 6682
RomC 6701 And yit full many a monk laboureth, 6692
RomC 6706 As many a wight may bere record, 6696
RomC 6709 Telle how a man may begge at nede, 6700
RomC 6716 If a man be so bestial 6706
RomC 6747 Or if a man wolde undirtake 6738
RomC 6785 He made a book, and lete it write, 6776
RomC 6796 Under a cope of papelardie. " 6786
RomC 6857 Where fyndest thou a swynker of labour 6846
RomC 6874 Hir paroch-prest nys but a beest 6864
RomC 6897 But doth not as they don a del; 6886
RomC 6947 That doth a good turn, out of drede, 6936
RomC 6951 A man thurgh hym avaunced be; 6940
RomC 6980 That is to me a gret lykyng. 6970
RomC 7008 Bet than a fish doth with his fynne. 6998
RomC 7025 Or if a wight out of mesure 7014
RomC 7050 He shal have of a corde a loigne, 7040
RomC 7050 He shal have of a corde a loigne, 7040
RomC 7054 A myle-wey aboute, and more; 7044
RomC 7060 Do maken up a tour of height, 7050
RomC 7097 A thousand and two hundred yeer, 7086
RomC 7099 Broughten a book, with sory grace, 7088
RomC 7123 And many a such comparisoun, 7110
RomC 7137 They nolde shewe more a del, 7124
RomC 7139 Til such a tyme that they may see 7126
RomC 7159 We wole a puple upon hym areyse, 7146
RomC 7259 That frouncen lyke a quaile pipe, 7246
RomC 7260 Or botis rivelyng as a gype; 7248
RomC 7265 To such folk shulde a prince hym yive, 7252
RomC 7290 Ye shulde have a stark lesyng 7278
RomC 7295 And seide, " Lo, heere a man aright 7282
RomC 7341 They wente hem forth, alle in a route, 7328
RomC 7362 As it were in a pilgrimage, 7350
RomC 7365 Tok on a robe of kamelyne, 7352
RomC 7366 And gan hir graithe as a Bygyne. 7354
RomC 7367 A large coverechief of thred 7354
RomC 7370 A peire of bedis eke she ber 7358
RomC 7371 Upon a las, all of whit thred, 7358
RomC 7373 But she ne bought hem never a del, 7360
RomC 7375 God wot, of a full hooly frere, 7362
RomC 7380 And many a sermoun seide hir to; 7368
RomC 7397 Of such a colour enlangoured 7384
RomC 7401 She had a burdown al of Thefte, 7388
RomC 7403 And a skryppe of Faynt Distresse, 7390
RomC 7408 Don on the cope of a frer, 7396
RomC 7412 About his necke he bar a byble, 7400
RomC 7415 He had of Treason a potente; 7402
RomC 7418 A rasour sharp and wel bytynge, 7406
RomC 7419 That was forged in a forge, 7406
RomC 7431 For he ne dredde hem not a del. 7418
RomC 7450 Thou woldest on a bok have sworn, 7438
RomC 7454 Was tho become a Jacobyn. 7442
RomC 7497 A short sermon unto you sayn. " 7484
RomC 7517 Thou spake a jape not longe ago, 7504
RomC 7519 Of a young man that here repayred, 7506
RomC 7536 That many a fals leasyng hath thought 7524
RomC 7550 He yeveth nat now therof a myte. 7538
RomC 7585 That han a lyer called me! 7572
RomC 7599 Why shulde men sey me such a thyng, 7586
RomC 7634 Though me hym thrilled with a spere; 7622
RomC 7670 Semblant, a good man semen ye, 7658
RomC 7684 A thousand tyme more pitee 7672