The Concordance
 
 'CH.................1
CYT 929 That is the cause and oother noon, so thee 'ch! " 27382
 
 A...................4319
GP 19 Bifil that in that seson on a day, 18
GP 24 Wel nyne and twenty in a compaignye 24
GP 42 And at a knyght than wol I first bigynne. 42
GP 43 A KNYGHT ther was, and that a worthy man, 42
GP 43 A KNYGHT ther was, and that a worthy man, 42
GP 60 At many a noble armee hadde he be. 60
GP 67 And everemoore he hadde a sovereyn prys. 66
GP 69 And of his port as meeke as is a mayde. 68
GP 72 He was a verray, parfit gentil knyght. 72
GP 75 Of fustian he wered a gypon 74
GP 79 With hym ther was his sone, a yong SQUIER, 78
GP 80 A lovyere and a lusty bacheler, 80
GP 80 A lovyere and a lusty bacheler, 80
GP 89 Embrouded was he, as it were a meede 88
GP 98 He sleep namoore than dooth a nyghtyngale. 98
GP 101 A YEMAN hadde he and servantz namo 100
GP 104 A sheef of pecok arwes, bright and kene, 104
GP 108 And in his hand he baar a myghty bowe. 108
GP 109 A not heed hadde he, with a broun visage. 108
GP 109 A not heed hadde he, with a broun visage. 108
GP 111 Upon his arm he baar a gay bracer, 110
GP 112 And by his syde a swerd and a bokeler, 112
GP 112 And by his syde a swerd and a bokeler, 112
GP 113 And on that oother syde a gay daggere 112
GP 115 A Cristopher on his brest of silver sheene. 114
GP 117 A forster was he, soothly, as I gesse. 116
GP 118 Ther was also a Nonne, a PRIORESSE, 118
GP 118 Ther was also a Nonne, a PRIORESSE, 118
GP 130 Wel koude she carie a morsel and wel kepe 130
GP 144 She wolde wepe, if that she saugh a mous 144
GP 145 Kaught in a trappe, if it were deed or bledde. 144
GP 149 Or if men smoot it with a yerde smerte; 148
GP 154 But sikerly she hadde a fair forheed; 154
GP 155 It was almoost a spanne brood, I trowe; 154
GP 159 A peire of bedes, gauded al with grene, 158
GP 160 And theron heng a brooch of gold ful sheene, 160
GP 161 On which ther was first write a crowned A, 160
GP 161 On which ther was first write a crowned A, 160
GP 165 A MONK ther was, a fair for the maistrie, 164
GP 165 A MONK ther was, a fair for the maistrie, 164
GP 167 A manly man, to been an abbot able. 166
GP 168 Ful many a deyntee hors hadde he in stable, 168
GP 170 Gynglen in a whistlynge wynd als cleere 170
GP 177 He yaf nat of that text a pulled hen, 176
GP 179 Ne that a monk, whan he is recchelees, 178
GP 180 Is likned til a fissh that is waterlees -- 180
GP 181 This is to seyn, a monk out of his cloystre. 180
GP 185 Upon a book in cloystre alwey to poure, 184
GP 189 Therfore he was a prikasour aright: 188
GP 194 With grys, and that the fyneste of a lond; 194
GP 196 He hadde of gold ywroght a ful curious pyn; 196
GP 197 A love-knotte in the gretter ende ther was. 196
GP 200 He was a lord ful fat and in good poynt; 200
GP 202 That stemed as a forneys of a leed; 202
GP 202 That stemed as a forneys of a leed; 202
GP 204 Now certeinly he was a fair prelaat; 204
GP 205 He was nat pale as a forpyned goost. 204
GP 206 A fat swan loved he best of any roost. 206
GP 207 His palfrey was as broun as is a berye. 206
GP 208 A FRERE ther was, a wantowne and a merye, 208
GP 208 A FRERE ther was, a wantowne and a merye, 208
GP 208 A FRERE ther was, a wantowne and a merye, 208
GP 209 A lymytour, a ful solempne man. 208
GP 209 A lymytour, a ful solempne man. 208
GP 212 He hadde maad ful many a mariage 212
GP 214 Unto his ordre he was a noble post. 214
GP 219 As seyde hymself, moore than a curat, 218
GP 224 Ther as he wiste to have a good pitaunce. 224
GP 225 For unto a povre ordre for to yive 224
GP 226 Is signe that a man is wel yshryve; 226
GP 228 He wiste that a man was repentaunt; 228
GP 229 For many a man so hard is of his herte, 228
GP 235 And certeinly he hadde a murye note: 234
GP 236 Wel koude he synge and pleyen on a rote; 236
GP 239 Therto he strong was as a champioun. 238
GP 242 Bet than a lazar or a beggestere, 242
GP 242 Bet than a lazar or a beggestere, 242
GP 243 For unto swich a worthy man as he 242
GP 252a [And yaf a certeyn ferme for the graunt; 252
GP 253 For thogh a wydwe hadde noght a sho, 254
GP 253 For thogh a wydwe hadde noght a sho, 254
GP 255 Yet wolde he have a ferthyng, er he wente. 256
GP 257 And rage he koude, as it were right a whelp. 258
GP 259 For ther he was nat lyk a cloysterer 260
GP 260 With a thredbare cope, as is a povre scoler, 262
GP 260 With a thredbare cope, as is a povre scoler, 262
GP 261 But he was lyk a maister or a pope. 262
GP 261 But he was lyk a maister or a pope. 262
GP 263 That rounded as a belle out of the presse. 264
GP 270 A MARCHANT was ther with a forked berd, 272
GP 270 A MARCHANT was ther with a forked berd, 272
GP 272 Upon his heed a Flaundryssh bever hat, 274
GP 283 For sothe he was a worthy man with alle, 284
GP 285 A CLERK ther was of Oxenford also, 286
GP 287 As leene was his hors as is a rake, 288
GP 297 But al be that he was a philosophre, 298
GP 309 A SERGEANT OF THE LAWE, war and wys, 310
GP 318 So greet a purchasour was nowher noon: 320
GP 321 Nowher so bisy a man as he ther nas, 322
GP 325 Therto he koude endite and make a thyng, 326
GP 328 He rood but hoomly in a medlee cote, 330
GP 329 Girt with a ceint of silk, with barres smale; 330
GP 331 A FRANKELEYN was in his compaignye. 332
GP 334 Wel loved he by the morwe a sop in wyn; 336
GP 339 An housholdere, and that a greet, was he; 340
GP 342 A bettre envyned man was nowher noon. 344
GP 349 Ful many a fat partrich hadde he in muwe, 350
GP 350 And many a breem and many a luce in stuwe. 352
GP 350 And many a breem and many a luce in stuwe. 352
GP 357 An anlaas and a gipser al of silk 358
GP 359 A shirreve hadde he been, and a contour. 360
GP 359 A shirreve hadde he been, and a contour. 360
GP 360 Was nowher swich a worthy vavasour. 362
GP 361 AN HABERDASSHERE and a CARPENTER, 362
GP 362 A WEBBE, a DYERE, and a TAPYCER -- 364
GP 362 A WEBBE, a DYERE, and a TAPYCER -- 364
GP 362 A WEBBE, a DYERE, and a TAPYCER -- 364
GP 364 Of a solempne and a greet fraternitee. 366
GP 364 Of a solempne and a greet fraternitee. 366
GP 369 Wel semed ech of hem a fair burgeys 370
GP 370 To sitten in a yeldehalle on a deys. 372
GP 370 To sitten in a yeldehalle on a deys. 372
GP 378 And have a mantel roialliche ybore. 380
GP 379 A COOK they hadde with hem for the nones 380
GP 382 Wel koude he knowe a draughte of Londoun ale. 384
GP 384 Maken mortreux, and wel bake a pye. 386
GP 386 That on his shyne a mormal hadde he. 388
GP 388 A SHIPMAN was ther, wonynge fer by weste; 390
GP 390 He rood upon a rouncy, as he kouthe, 392
GP 391 In a gowne of faldyng to the knee. 392
GP 392 A daggere hangynge on a laas hadde he 394
GP 392 A daggere hangynge on a laas hadde he 394
GP 395 And certeinly he was a good felawe. 396
GP 396 Ful many a draughte of wyn had he ydrawe 398
GP 406 With many a tempest hadde his berd been shake. 408
GP 411 With us ther was a DOCTOUR OF PHISIK; 412
GP 415 He kepte his pacient a ful greet deel 416
GP 422 He was a verray, parfit praktisour: 424
GP 443 For gold in phisik is a cordial, 444
GP 445 A good WIF was ther OF biside BATHE, 446
GP 455 That on a Sonday weren upon hir heed. 456
GP 459 She was a worthy womman al hir lyve: 460
GP 464 She hadde passed many a straunge strem; 466
GP 471 As brood as is a bokeler or a targe; 472
GP 471 As brood as is a bokeler or a targe; 472
GP 472 A foot-mantel aboute hir hipes large, 474
GP 473 And on hir feet a paire of spores sharpe. 474
GP 477 A good man was ther of religioun, 478
GP 478 And was a povre PERSOUN OF A TOUN, 480
GP 478 And was a povre PERSOUN OF A TOUN, 480
GP 480 He was also a lerned man, a clerk, 482
GP 480 He was also a lerned man, a clerk, 482
GP 495 Upon his feet, and in his hand a staf. 496
GP 501 For if a preest be foul, on whom we truste, 502
GP 502 No wonder is a lewed man to ruste; 504
GP 503 And shame it is, if a prest take keep, 504
GP 504 A shiten shepherde and a clene sheep. 506
GP 504 A shiten shepherde and a clene sheep. 506
GP 505 Wel oghte a preest ensample for to yive, 506
GP 510 To seken hym a chaunterie for soules, 512
GP 511 Or with a bretherhed to been withholde; 512
GP 514 He was a shepherde and noght a mercenarie. 516
GP 514 He was a shepherde and noght a mercenarie. 516
GP 524 A bettre preest I trowe that nowher noon ys. 526
GP 526 Ne maked him a spiced conscience, 528
GP 529 With hym ther was a PLOWMAN, was his brother, 530
GP 530 That hadde ylad of dong ful many a fother; 532
GP 531 A trewe swynkere and a good was he, 532
GP 531 A trewe swynkere and a good was he, 532
GP 541 In a tabard he rood upon a mere. 542
GP 541 In a tabard he rood upon a mere. 542
GP 542 Ther was also a REVE, and a MILLERE, 544
GP 542 Ther was also a REVE, and a MILLERE, 544
GP 543 A SOMNOUR, and a PARDONER also, 544
GP 543 A SOMNOUR, and a PARDONER also, 544
GP 544 A MAUNCIPLE, and myself -- ther were namo. 546
GP 545 The MILLERE was a stout carl for the nones; 546
GP 549 He was short-sholdred, brood, a thikke knarre; 550
GP 551 Or breke it at a rennyng with his heed. 552
GP 553 And therto brood, as though it were a spade. 554
GP 555 A werte, and theron stood a toft of herys, 556
GP 555 A werte, and theron stood a toft of herys, 556
GP 556 Reed as the brustles of a sowes erys; 558
GP 558 A swerd and a bokeler bar he by his syde. 560
GP 558 A swerd and a bokeler bar he by his syde. 560
GP 559 His mouth as greet was as a greet forneys. 560
GP 560 He was a janglere and a goliardeys, 562
GP 560 He was a janglere and a goliardeys, 562
GP 563 And yet he hadde a thombe of gold, pardee. 564
GP 564 A whit cote and a blew hood wered he. 566
GP 564 A whit cote and a blew hood wered he. 566
GP 565 A baggepipe wel koude he blowe and sowne, 566
GP 567 A gentil MAUNCIPLE was ther of a temple, 568
GP 567 A gentil MAUNCIPLE was ther of a temple, 568
GP 573 Now is nat that of God a ful fair grace 574
GP 574 That swich a lewed mannes wit shal pace 576
GP 578 Of which ther were a duszeyne in that hous 580
GP 584 And able for to helpen al a shire 586
GP 587 The REVE was a sclendre colerik man. 588
GP 590 His top was dokked lyk a preest biforn. 592
GP 592 Ylyk a staf; ther was no calf ysene. 594
GP 593 Wel koude he kepe a gerner and a bynne; 594
GP 593 Wel koude he kepe a gerner and a bynne; 594
GP 612 And have a thank, and yet a cote and hood. 614
GP 612 And have a thank, and yet a cote and hood. 614
GP 613 In youthe he hadde lerned a good myster: 614
GP 614 He was a wel good wrighte, a carpenter. 616
GP 614 He was a wel good wrighte, a carpenter. 616
GP 615 This Reve sat upon a ful good stot 616
GP 617 A long surcote of pers upon he hade, 618
GP 618 And by his syde he baar a rusty blade. 620
GP 620 Biside a toun men clepen Baldeswelle. 622
GP 621 Tukked he was as is a frere aboute, 622
GP 623 A SOMONOUR was ther with us in that place, 624
GP 624 That hadde a fyr-reed cherubynnes face, 626
GP 626 As hoot he was and lecherous as a sparwe, 628
GP 639 A fewe termes hadde he, two or thre, 640
GP 642 And eek ye knowen wel how that a jay 644
GP 647 He was a gentil harlot and a kynde; 648
GP 647 He was a gentil harlot and a kynde; 648
GP 648 A bettre felawe sholde men noght fynde. 650
GP 649 He wolde suffre for a quart of wyn 650
GP 650 A good felawe to have his concubyn 652
GP 651 A twelf month, and excuse hym atte fulle; 652
GP 652 Ful prively a fynch eek koude he pulle. 654
GP 653 And if he foond owher a good felawe, 654
GP 656 But if a mannes soule were in his purs; 658
GP 662 And also war hym of a Significavit. 664
GP 666 A gerland hadde he set upon his heed, 668
GP 668 A bokeleer hadde he maad hym of a cake. 670
GP 668 A bokeleer hadde he maad hym of a cake. 670
GP 669 With hym ther rood a gentil PARDONER 670
GP 673 This Somonour bar to hym a stif burdoun; 674
GP 674 Was nevere trompe of half so greet a soun. 676
GP 676 But smothe it heeng as dooth a strike of flex; 678
GP 685 A vernycle hadde he sowed upon his cappe. 686
GP 688 A voys he hadde as smal as hath a goot. 690
GP 688 A voys he hadde as smal as hath a goot. 690
GP 691 I trowe he were a geldyng or a mare. 692
GP 691 I trowe he were a geldyng or a mare. 692
GP 694 For in his male he hadde a pilwe-beer, 696
GP 696 He seyde he hadde a gobet of the seyl 698
GP 699 He hadde a croys of latoun ful of stones, 700
GP 700 And in a glas he hadde pigges bones. 702
GP 702 A povre person dwellynge upon lond, 704
GP 703 Upon a day he gat hym moore moneye 704
GP 708 He was in chirche a noble ecclesiaste. 710
GP 709 Wel koude he rede a lessoun or a storie, 710
GP 709 Wel koude he rede a lessoun or a storie, 710
GP 715 Now have I toold you soothly, in a clause, 716
GP 731 Whoso shal telle a tale after a man, 732
GP 731 Whoso shal telle a tale after a man, 732
GP 733 Everich a word, if it be in his charge, 734
GP 751 A semely man OURE HOOSTE was withalle 752
GP 752 For to been a marchal in an halle. 754
GP 753 A large man he was with eyen stepe -- 754
GP 754 A fairer burgeys was ther noon in Chepe -- 756
GP 757 Eek therto he was right a myrie man; 758
GP 764 I saugh nat this yeer so myrie a compaignye 766
GP 767 And of a myrthe I am right now bythoght, 768
GP 774 To ride by the weye doumb as a stoon; 776
GP 799 Shal have a soper at oure aller cost 800
GP 815 And sette a soper at a certeyn pris, 816
GP 815 And sette a soper at a certeyn pris, 816
GP 824 And gadrede us togidre alle in a flok, 826
GP 825 And forth we riden a litel moore than paas 826
GP 854 What, welcome be the cut, a Goddes name! 856
GP 857 And he bigan with right a myrie cheere 858
KnT 860 Ther was a duc that highte Theseus; 862
KnT 862 And in his tyme swich a conquerour 864
KnT 864 Ful many a riche contree hadde he wonne; 866
KnT 886 I have, God woot, a large feeld to ere, 888
KnT 898 A compaignye of ladyes, tweye and tweye, 900
KnT 900 But swich a cry and swich a wo they make 902
KnT 900 But swich a cry and swich a wo they make 902
KnT 913 Whan she hadde swowned with a deedly cheere, 914
KnT 916 Victorie, and as a conqueror to lyven, 918
KnT 923 That she ne hath been a duchesse or a queene. 924
KnT 923 That she ne hath been a duchesse or a queene. 924
KnT 969 Ne take his ese fully half a day, 970
KnT 984 Faire in a feeld, ther as he thoughte to fighte. 986
KnT 987 He faught, and slough hym manly as a knyght 988
KnT 1010 Thurgh-girt with many a grevous blody wounde, 1012
KnT 1027 With laurer crowned as a conquerour; 1028
KnT 1030 And in a tour, in angwissh and in wo, 1032
KnT 1034 Till it fil ones, in a morwe of May, 1036
KnT 1049 Hir yelow heer was broyded in a tresse 1050
KnT 1050 Bihynde hir bak, a yerde long, I gesse. 1052
KnT 1054 To make a subtil gerland for hire hede; 1056
KnT 1065 Was risen and romed in a chambre an heigh, 1066
KnT 1075 That thurgh a wyndow, thikke of many a barre 1076
KnT 1075 That thurgh a wyndow, thikke of many a barre 1076
KnT 1078 And therwithal he bleynte and cride, " A! " 1080
KnT 1094 Thow hast a veyn ymaginacioun. 1096
KnT 1117 And with a sigh he seyde pitously, 1118
KnT 1149 For which thou art ybounden as a knyght 1150
KnT 1157 Wheither she be a womman or goddesse! 1158
KnT 1159 And myn is love as to a creature; 1160
KnT 1164 That `who shal yeve a lovere any lawe?' 1166
KnT 1165 Love is a gretter lawe, by my pan, 1166
KnT 1169 A man moot nedes love, maugree his heed; 1170
KnT 1179 Ther cam a kyte, whil that they were so wrothe, 1180
KnT 1189 But to th' effect. It happed on a day, 1190
KnT 1191 A worthy duc that highte Perotheus, 1192
KnT 1208 In swich a gyse as I you tellen shal. 1210
KnT 1215 That with a swerd he sholde lese his heed. 1216
KnT 1219 How greet a sorwe suffreth now Arcite! 1220
KnT 1241 And art a knyght, a worthy and an able, 1242
KnT 1241 And art a knyght, a worthy and an able, 1242
KnT 1253 That yeveth hem ful ofte in many a gyse 1254
KnT 1261 We faren as he that dronke is as a mous. 1262
KnT 1262 A dronke man woot wel he hath an hous, 1264
KnT 1264 And to a dronke man the wey is slider. 1266
KnT 1269 That wende and hadde a greet opinioun 1270
KnT 1287 And make a werre so sharp on this citee 1288
KnT 1293 And art a lord, greet is thyn avauntage 1294
KnT 1294 Moore than is myn, that sterve here in a cage. 1296
KnT 1318 Ther as a beest may al his lust fulfille. 1320
KnT 1319 And whan a beest is deed he hath no peyne; 1320
KnT 1325 Allas, I se a serpent or a theef, 1326
KnT 1325 Allas, I se a serpent or a theef, 1326
KnT 1326 That many a trewe man hath doon mescheef, 1328
KnT 1334 Now wol I stynte of Palamon a lite, 1336
KnT 1356 Ful ofte a day he swelte and seyde " Allas! " 1358
KnT 1362 That lene he wex and drye as is a shaft; 1364
KnT 1381 Whan he endured hadde a yeer or two 1382
KnT 1384 Upon a nyght in sleep as he hym leyde, 1386
KnT 1399 And with that word he caughte a greet mirour, 1400
KnT 1409 And cladde hym as a povre laborer, 1410
KnT 1410 And al allone, save oonly a squier 1412
KnT 1414 And to the court he wente upon a day, 1416
KnT 1418 He fil in office with a chamberleyn 1420
KnT 1426 A yeer or two he was in this servyse, 1428
KnT 1429 But half so wel biloved a man as he 1430
KnT 1433 They seyden that it were a charitee 1434
KnT 1437 And thus withinne a while his name is spronge, 1438
KnT 1440 That of his chambre he made hym a squier, 1442
KnT 1450 And speke I wole of Palamon a lite. 1452
KnT 1457 And eek therto he is a prisoner 1458
KnT 1458 Perpetuelly, noght oonly for a yer. 1460
KnT 1466 As, whan a thyng is shapen, it shal be -- 1468
KnT 1468 By helpyng of a freend, brak his prisoun 1470
KnT 1471 Of a clarree maad of a certeyn wyn, 1472
KnT 1471 Of a clarree maad of a certeyn wyn, 1472
KnT 1478 And til a grove faste ther bisyde 1480
KnT 1502 He on a courser, startlynge as the fir, 1504
KnT 1504 Out of the court, were it a myle or tweye. 1506
KnT 1507 To maken hym a gerland of the greves, 1508
KnT 1513 And from his courser, with a lusty herte, 1514
KnT 1515 And in a path he rometh up and doun, 1516
KnT 1517 Was in a bussh, that no man myghte hym se, 1518
KnT 1523 It is ful fair a man to bere hym evene, 1524
KnT 1530 Into a studie he fil sodeynly, 1532
KnT 1533 Now up, now doun, as boket in a welle. 1534
KnT 1558 Now highte I Philostrate, noght worth a myte. 1560
KnT 1570 Ne sette I nat the montance of a tare, 1572
KnT 1572 And with that word he fil doun in a traunce 1574
KnT 1573 A longe tyme, and after he up sterte. 1574
KnT 1575 He felte a coold swerd sodeynliche glyde, 1576
KnT 1608 But for as muche thou art a worthy knyght 1610
KnT 1612 That heere I wol be founden as a knyght, 1614
KnT 1639 That stondeth at the gappe with a spere, 1640
KnT 1656 In his fightyng were a wood leon, 1658
KnT 1657 And as a crueel tigre was Arcite; 1658
KnT 1667 The contrarie of a thyng by ye or nay, 1668
KnT 1668 Yet somtyme it shal fallen on a day 1670
KnT 1669 That falleth nat eft withinne a thousand yeer. 1670
KnT 1693 And over a brook, and so forth on his weye. 1694
KnT 1694 This duc wol han a cours at hym or tweye 1696
KnT 1705 And at a stert he was bitwix hem two, 1706
KnT 1706 And pulled out a swerd and cride, " Hoo! 1708
KnT 1713 As it were in a lystes roially. " 1714
KnT 1719 And as thou art a rightful lord and juge, 1720
KnT 1729 Thus hath he japed thee ful many a yer, 1730
KnT 1743 And seyde, " This is a short conclusioun. 1744
KnT 1752 That evere swich a chaunce sholde falle, 1754
KnT 1763 He hath considered shortly, in a clause, 1764
KnT 1774 Upon a lord that wol have no mercy, 1776
KnT 1775 But been a leon, bothe in word and dede, 1776
KnT 1777 As wel as to a proud despitous man 1778
KnT 1785 " The god of love, a benedicite! 1786
KnT 1786 How myghty and how greet a lord is he! 1788
KnT 1788 He may be cleped a god for his myracles, 1790
KnT 1799 Who may been a fool but if he love? 1800
KnT 1810 By God, than woot a cokkow or an hare! 1812
KnT 1812 A man moot ben a fool, or yong or oold -- 1814
KnT 1812 A man moot ben a fool, or yong or oold -- 1814
KnT 1814 For in my tyme a servant was I oon. 1816
KnT 1816 And woot hou soore it kan a man distreyne, 1818
KnT 1830 Though that she were a queene or a princesse, 1832
KnT 1830 Though that she were a queene or a princesse, 1832
KnT 1855 Upon my trouthe, and as I am a knyght, 1856
KnT 1861 To whom that Fortune yeveth so fair a grace. 1862
KnT 1874 Whan Theseus hath doon so fair a grace? 1876
KnT 1885 That swich a noble theatre as it was 1886
KnT 1887 The circuit a myle was aboute, 1888
KnT 1891 That whan a man was set on o degree, 1892
KnT 1893 Estward ther stood a gate of marbul whit, 1894
KnT 1895 And shortly to concluden, swich a place 1896
KnT 1908 That coste largely of gold a fother. 1910
KnT 1909 And northward, in a touret on the wal, 1910
KnT 1929 That wered of yelewe gooldes a gerland, 1930
KnT 1930 And a cokkow sittynge on hir hand; 1932
KnT 1954 And though I koude rekene a thousand mo. 1956
KnT 1959 A citole in hir right hand hadde she, 1960
KnT 1961 A rose gerland, fressh and wel smellynge; 1962
KnT 1966 A bowe he bar and arwes brighte and kene. 1968
KnT 1975 First on the wal was peynted a forest, 1976
KnT 1979 In which ther ran a rumbel in a swough, 1980
KnT 1979 In which ther ran a rumbel in a swough, 1980
KnT 1980 As though a storm sholde bresten every bough. 1982
KnT 1981 And dounward from an hille, under a bente, 1982
KnT 1985 And therout came a rage and swich a veze 1986
KnT 1985 And therout came a rage and swich a veze 1986
KnT 2014 A thousand slayn, and nat of qualm ystorve; 2016
KnT 2027 And al above, depeynted in a tour, 2028
KnT 2030 Hangynge by a soutil twynes threed. 2032
KnT 2041 The statue of Mars upon a carte stood 2042
KnT 2047 A wolf ther stood biforn hym at his feet 2048
KnT 2048 With eyen rede, and of a man he eet; 2050
KnT 2058 Was turned from a womman til a bere, 2060
KnT 2058 Was turned from a womman til a bere, 2060
KnT 2061 Hir sone is eek a sterre, as men may see. 2062
KnT 2062 Ther saugh I Dane, yturned til a tree -- 2064
KnT 2069 Yet peynted was a litel forther moor 2070
KnT 2077 And undernethe hir feet she hadde a moone -- 2078
KnT 2080 With bowe in honde and arwes in a cas. 2082
KnT 2083 A womman travaillynge was hire biforn; 2084
KnT 2088 With many a floryn he the hewes boghte. 2090
KnT 2093 But stynte I wole of Theseus a lite, 2094
KnT 2101 And sikerly ther trowed many a man 2102
KnT 2105 Nas of so fewe so noble a compaignye. 2106
KnT 2107 And wolde, his thankes, han a passant name, 2108
KnT 2110 For if ther fille tomorwe swich a cas, 2112
KnT 2115 To fighte for a lady, benedicitee! 2116
KnT 2116 It were a lusty sighte for to see. 2118
KnT 2120 And in a brestplate and a light gypoun; 2122
KnT 2120 And in a brestplate and a light gypoun; 2122
KnT 2121 And som wol have a paire plates large; 2122
KnT 2122 And som wol have a Pruce sheeld or a targe; 2124
KnT 2122 And som wol have a Pruce sheeld or a targe; 2124
KnT 2124 And have an ax, and som a mace of steel -- 2126
KnT 2133 And lik a grifphon looked he aboute, 2134
KnT 2138 Ful hye upon a chaar of gold stood he, 2140
KnT 2142 He hadde a beres skyn, col-blak for old. 2144
KnT 2145 A wrethe of gold, arm-greet, of huge wighte, 2146
KnT 2157 Upon a steede bay trapped in steel, 2158
KnT 2163 A mantelet upon his shulder hangynge, 2164
KnT 2169 A fewe frakenes in his face yspreynd, 2170
KnT 2171 And as a leon he his lookyng caste. 2172
KnT 2174 His voys was as a trompe thonderynge. 2176
KnT 2176 A gerland, fressh and lusty for to sene. 2178
KnT 2186 Ful many a tame leon and leopart. 2188
KnT 2217 And in hir houre he walketh forth a pas 2218
KnT 2255 Thanne preye I thee, tomorwe with a spere 2256
KnT 2266 And made a signe, wherby that he took 2268
KnT 2268 For thogh the signe shewed a delay, 2270
KnT 2283 Hir body wessh with water of a welle. 2284
KnT 2286 And yet it were a game to heeren al. 2288
KnT 2288 But it is good a man been at his large. 2290
KnT 2290 A coroune of a grene ook cerial 2292
KnT 2290 A coroune of a grene ook cerial 2292
KnT 2301 Ful many a yeer, and woost what I desire, 2302
KnT 2305 Desire to ben a mayden al my lyf, 2306
KnT 2308 A mayde, and love huntynge and venerye, 2310
KnT 2310 And noght to ben a wyf and be with childe. 2312
KnT 2330 And whil I lyve, a mayde I wol thee serve. " 2332
KnT 2333 But sodeynly she saugh a sighte queynte, 2334
KnT 2337 And as it queynte it made a whistelynge, 2338
KnT 2360 And forth she wente and made a vanysshynge; 2362
KnT 2388 Although thee ones on a tyme mysfille, 2390
KnT 2427 A sweete smel the ground anon up yaf, 2428
KnT 2432 And with that soun he herde a murmurynge 2434
KnT 2494 And to the paleys rood ther many a route 2496
KnT 2520 " He hath a sparth of twenty pound of wighte. " 2522
KnT 2528 Duc Theseus was at a wyndow set, 2530
KnT 2529 Arrayed right as he were a god in trone. 2530
KnT 2533 An heraud on a scaffold made an " Oo! " 2534
KnT 2549 But o cours with a sharpe ygrounde spere; 2550
KnT 2563 " God save swich a lord, that is so good 2564
KnT 2569 Ful lik a lord this noble duc gan ryde, 2570
KnT 2614 He rolleth under foot as dooth a bal; 2616
KnT 2623 Ful ofte a day han thise Thebanes two 2624
KnT 2646 Is born out of his sadel a swerdes lengthe, 2648
KnT 2660 Anon ther is a noyse of peple bigonne 2662
KnT 2674 But herkneth me, and stynteth noyse a lite, 2676
KnT 2675 Which a myracle ther bifel anon. 2676
KnT 2677 And on a courser, for to shewe his face, 2678
KnT 2680 And she agayn hym caste a freendlich ye 2682
KnT 2684 Out of the ground a furie infernal sterte, 2686
KnT 2697 And in a bed ybrought ful faire and blyve, 2698
KnT 2710 That with a spere was thirled his brest boon. 2712
KnT 2720 But as a justes or a tourneiynge; 2722
KnT 2720 But as a justes or a tourneiynge; 2722
KnT 2736 And fully heeld a feeste dayes three, 2738
KnT 2738 Out of his toun a journee largely. 2740
KnT 2784 Had strif and rancour many a day agon 2786
KnT 2787 To speken of a servaunt proprely, 2788
KnT 2796 And if that evere ye shul ben a wyf, 2798
KnT 2847 This world nys but a thurghfare ful of wo, 2848
KnT 2863 He wolde make a fyr in which the office 2864
KnT 2866 The okes olde, and leye hem on a rewe 2868
KnT 2871 After a beere, and it al overspradde 2872
KnT 2875 Eek on his heed a coroune of laurer grene, 2876
KnT 2876 And in his hond a swerd ful bright and kene. 2878
KnT 2897 And riden forth a paas with sorweful cheere 2898
KnT 2918 Of stree first ther was leyd ful many a lode. 2920
KnT 2934 And thanne with drye stikkes cloven a thre, 2936
KnT 2937 And gerlandes, hangynge with ful many a flour; 2938
KnT 2953 Upon the left hand, with a loud shoutynge, 2954
KnT 2970 Thanne semed me ther was a parlement 2972
KnT 2982 And Theseus abiden hadde a space 2984
KnT 2985 And with a sad visage he siked stille, 2986
KnT 3005 Wel may men knowe, but it be a fool, 3006
KnT 3008 Of no partie or cantel of a thyng, 3010
KnT 3009 But of a thyng that parfit is and stable, 3010
KnT 3017 " Loo the ook, that hath so long a norisshynge 3018
KnT 3019 And hath so long a lif, as we may see, 3020
KnT 3030 He moot be deed, the kyng as shal a page; 3032
KnT 3047 And certeinly a man hath moost honour 3048
KnT 3055 Thanne is it best, as for a worthy fame, 3056
KnT 3064 Kan he hem thank? Nay, God woot, never a deel, 3066
KnT 3084 He is a kynges brother sone, pardee; 3086
KnT 3085 And though he were a povre bacheler, 3086
KnT 3086 Syn he hath served yow so many a yeer, 3088
MilT 3111 That he ne seyde it was a noble storie 3112
MilT 3126 I kan a noble tale for the nones, 3128
MilT 3134 Oure Hoost answerde, " Tel on, a devel wey! 3136
MilT 3135 Thou art a fool; thy wit is overcome. " 3136
MilT 3137 But first I make a protestacioun 3138
MilT 3141 For I wol telle a legende and a lyf 3142
MilT 3141 For I wol telle a legende and a lyf 3142
MilT 3142 Bothe of a carpenter and of his wyf, 3144
MilT 3143 How that a clerk hath set the wrightes cappe. " 3144
MilT 3146 It is a synne and eek a greet folye 3148
MilT 3146 It is a synne and eek a greet folye 3148
MilT 3155 And evere a thousand goode ayeyns oon badde. 3156
MilT 3158 I have a wyf, pardee, as wel as thow; 3160
MilT 3182 The Millere is a cherl; ye knowe wel this. 3184
MilT 3188 A riche gnof, that gestes heeld to bord, 3190
MilT 3189 And of his craft he was a carpenter. 3190
MilT 3190 With hym ther was dwellynge a poure scoler, 3192
MilT 3193 And koude a certeyn of conclusiouns, 3194
MilT 3202 And lyk a mayden meke for to see. 3204
MilT 3203 A chambre hadde he in that hostelrye 3204
MilT 3212 His presse ycovered with a faldyng reed; 3214
MilT 3213 And al above ther lay a gay sautrie, 3214
MilT 3221 This carpenter hadde wedded newe a wyf, 3222
MilT 3226 And demed hymself been lik a cokewold. 3228
MilT 3235 A ceynt she werede, barred al of silk, 3236
MilT 3236 A barmclooth as whit as morne milk 3238
MilT 3237 Upon hir lendes, ful of many a goore. 3238
MilT 3244 And sikerly she hadde a likerous ye; 3246
MilT 3249 And softer than the wolle is of a wether. 3250
MilT 3250 And by hir girdel heeng a purs of lether, 3252
MilT 3254 So gay a popelote or swich a wenche. 3256
MilT 3254 So gay a popelote or swich a wenche. 3256
MilT 3258 As any swalwe sittynge on a berne. 3260
MilT 3263 Wynsynge she was, as is a joly colt, 3264
MilT 3264 Long as a mast, and upright as a bolt. 3266
MilT 3264 Long as a mast, and upright as a bolt. 3266
MilT 3265 A brooch she baar upon hir lowe coler, 3266
MilT 3266 As brood as is the boos of a bokeler. 3268
MilT 3268 She was a prymerole, a piggesnye, 3270
MilT 3268 She was a prymerole, a piggesnye, 3270
MilT 3272 That on a day this hende Nicholas 3274
MilT 3282 And she sproong as a colt dooth in the trave, 3284
MilT 3299 " A clerk hadde litherly biset his whyle, 3300
MilT 3300 But if he koude a carpenter bigyle. " 3302
MilT 3302 To wayte a tyme, as I have told biforn. 3304
MilT 3312 Now was ther of that chirche a parissh clerk, 3314
MilT 3315 And strouted as a fanne large and brode; 3316
MilT 3321 Al in a kirtel of a lyght waget; 3322
MilT 3321 Al in a kirtel of a lyght waget; 3322
MilT 3323 And therupon he hadde a gay surplys 3324
MilT 3325 A myrie child he was, so God me save. 3326
MilT 3327 And maken a chartre of lond or acquitaunce. 3328
MilT 3331 And pleyen songes on a smal rubible; 3332
MilT 3332 Therto he song som tyme a loud quynyble; 3334
MilT 3333 And as wel koude he pleye on a giterne. 3334
MilT 3340 Gooth with a sencer on the haliday, 3342
MilT 3342 And many a lovely look on hem he caste, 3344
MilT 3344 To looke on hire hym thoughte a myrie lyf, 3346
MilT 3346 I dar wel seyn, if she hadde been a mous, 3348
MilT 3347 And he a cat, he wolde hire hente anon. 3348
MilT 3349 Hath in his herte swich a love-longynge 3350
MilT 3357 A litel after cokkes hadde ycrowe, 3358
MilT 3358 And dressed hym up by a shot-wyndowe 3360
MilT 3377 He syngeth, brokkynge as a nyghtyngale; 3378
MilT 3384 He pleyeth Herodes upon a scaffold hye. 3386
MilT 3388 He ne hadde for his labour but a scorn. 3390
MilT 3390 And al his ernest turneth til a jape. 3392
MilT 3399 And so bifel it on a Saterday, 3400
MilT 3403 That Nicholas shal shapen hym a wyle 3404
MilT 3411 Bothe mete and drynke for a day or tweye, 3412
MilT 3429 I saugh today a cors yborn to chirche 3430
MilT 3432 " Clepe at his dore, or knokke with a stoon. 3434
MilT 3439 But al for noght; he herde nat a word. 3440
MilT 3440 An hole he foond, ful lowe upon a bord, 3442
MilT 3443 And at the laste he hadde of hym a sight. 3444
MilT 3450 A man woot litel what hym shal bityde. 3452
MilT 3455 Ye, blessed be alwey a lewed man 3456
MilT 3460 Til he was in a marle-pit yfalle; 3462
MilT 3465 Get me a staf, that I may underspore, 3466
MilT 3469 His knave was a strong carl for the nones, 3470
MilT 3497 And broghte of myghty ale a large quart; 3498
MilT 3516 That now a Monday next, at quarter nyght, 3518
MilT 3517 Shal falle a reyn, and that so wilde and wood 3518
MilT 3543 That she hadde had a ship hirself allone. 3544
MilT 3548 A knedyng trogh, or ellis a kymelyn, 3550
MilT 3548 A knedyng trogh, or ellis a kymelyn, 3550
MilT 3550 In which we mowe swymme as in a barge, 3552
MilT 3552 But for a day -- fy on the remenant! 3554
MilT 3560 To han as greet a grace as Noe hadde. 3562
MilT 3586 That noon of us ne speke nat a word, 3588
MilT 3611 Lo, which a greet thyng is affeccioun! 3612
MilT 3619 He siketh with ful many a sory swogh; 3620
MilT 3620 He gooth and geteth hym a knedyng trogh, 3622
MilT 3621 And after that a tubbe and a kymelyn, 3622
MilT 3621 And after that a tubbe and a kymelyn, 3622
MilT 3628 With breed, and chese, and good ale in a jubbe, 3630
MilT 3629 Suffisynge right ynogh as for a day. 3630
MilT 3637 They seten stille wel a furlong way. 3638
MilT 3661 And axed upon cas a cloisterer 3662
MilT 3668 And dwellen at the grange a day or two; 3670
MilT 3683 That is a signe of kissyng atte leeste. 3684
MilT 3684 Al nyght me mette eek I was at a feeste. 3686
MilT 3692 Under his tonge a trewe-love he beer, 3694
MilT 3697 And softe he cougheth with a semy soun: 3698
MilT 3704 I moorne as dooth a lamb after the tete. 3706
MilT 3706 That lik a turtel trewe is my moornynge. 3708
MilT 3707 I may nat ete na moore than a mayde. " 3708
MilT 3712 Go forth thy wey, or I wol caste a ston, 3714
MilT 3713 And lat me slepe, a twenty devel wey! " 3714
MilT 3724 And seyde, " I am a lord at alle degrees; 3726
MilT 3737 For wel he wiste a womman hath no berd. 3738
MilT 3738 He felte a thyng al rough and long yherd, 3740
MilT 3741 And Absolon gooth forth a sory pas. 3742
MilT 3742 " A berd! A berd! " quod hende Nicholas, 3744
MilT 3742 " A berd! A berd! " quod hende Nicholas, 3744
MilT 3756 Of paramours he sette nat a kers, 3758
MilT 3759 And weep as dooth a child that is ybete. 3760
MilT 3760 A softe paas he wente over the strete 3762
MilT 3761 Until a smyth men cleped daun Gerveys, 3762
MilT 3772 This Absolon ne roghte nat a bene 3774
MilT 3780 Or in a poke nobles alle untold, 3782
MilT 3791 That knokketh so? I warante it a theef. " 3792
MilT 3794 Of gold, " quod he, " I have thee broght a ryng. 3796
MilT 3806 This Nicholas anon leet fle a fart 3808
MilT 3807 As greet as it had been a thonder-dent, 3808
MilT 3842 And turned al his harm unto a jape. 3844
RvT 3862 A litel ire is in his herte ylaft; 3864
RvT 3863 He gan to grucche, and blamed it a lite. 3864
RvT 3865 With bleryng of a proud milleres ye, 3866
RvT 3877 For in oure wyl ther stiketh evere a nayl, 3878
RvT 3878 To have an hoor heed and a grene tayl, 3880
RvT 3879 As hath a leek; for thogh oure myght be goon, 3880
RvT 3888 And yet ik have alwey a coltes tooth, 3890
RvT 3889 As many a yeer as it is passed henne 3890
RvT 3900 He gan to speke as lordly as a kyng. 3902
RvT 3903 The devel made a reve for to preche, 3904
RvT 3904 Or of a soutere a shipman or a leche. 3906
RvT 3904 Or of a soutere a shipman or a leche. 3906
RvT 3904 Or of a soutere a shipman or a leche. 3906
RvT 3907 Lo Grenewych, ther many a shrewe is inne! 3908
RvT 3914 How that bigyled was a carpenteer, 3916
RvT 3919 He kan wel in myn eye seen a stalke, 3920
RvT 3920 But in his owene he kan nat seen a balke. " 3922
MLT 25 Wel kan Senec and many a philosophre 3946
MLT 34 Telle us a tale anon, as forward is. 3956
MLT 43 For swich lawe as a man yeveth another wight, 3964
MLT 50 Of olde tyme, as knoweth many a man; 3972
MLT 84 That is so horrible a tale for to rede, 4006
MLT 94 But nathelees, I recche noght a bene 4016
MLT 97 And with that word he, with a sobre cheere, 4018
MLT 132 Nere that a marchant, goon is many a yeere, 4054
MLT 132 Nere that a marchant, goon is many a yeere, 4054
MLT 133 Me taughte a tale, which that ye shal heere. 4054
MLT 134 In Surrye whilom dwelte a compaignye 4056
MLT 149 A certein tyme, as fil to hire plesance. 4070
MLT 157 A doghter hath that, syn the world bigan, 4078
MLT 197 In sterres, many a wynter therbiforn, 4118
MLT 208 To han Custance withinne a litel space, 4130
MLT 213 Many a subtil resoun forth they leyden; 4134
MLT 251 May no man tellen in a litel clause 4172
MLT 252 As was arrayed for so heigh a cause. 4174
MLT 314 Noght whan a roote is of a burthe yknowe? 4236
MLT 314 Noght whan a roote is of a burthe yknowe? 4236
MLT 352 Coold water shal nat greve us but a lite! -- 4274
MLT 353 And I shal swich a feeste and revel make 4274
MLT 357 Thogh she a font-ful water with hire lede. " 4278
MLT 375 She rydeth to the Sowdan on a day, 4296
MLT 387 In Surrye, with a greet solempne route, 4308
MLT 396 Receyveth hire with also glad a cheere 4318
MLT 399 A softe paas solempnely they ryde. 4320
MLT 401 Of which that Lucan maketh swich a boost, 4322
MLT 439 And in a ship al steerelees, God woot, 4360
MLT 442 A certein tresor that she thider ladde, 4364
MLT 459 The white Lamb, that hurt was with a spere, 4380
MLT 466 On many a sory meel now may she bayte; 4388
MLT 510 That thennes wolde it noght of al a tyde; 4432
MLT 519 A maner Latyn corrupt was hir speche, 4440
MLT 537 In orisons, with many a bitter teere, 4458
MLT 557 Toward the see a furlong wey or two, 4478
MLT 577 But kepte it strongly many a wyntres space 4498
MLT 585 And made a yong knyght that dwelte in that toun 4506
MLT 594 And pryvely upon a nyght he crepte 4516
MLT 612 That in a ship was founden this Custance, 4534
MLT 615 Whan he saugh so benigne a creature 4536
MLT 623 That she had doon so greet a wikkednesse, 4544
MLT 628 This gentil kyng hath caught a greet motyf 4550
MLT 630 Depper in this, a trouthe for to lere. 4552
MLT 645 Have ye nat seyn somtyme a pale face, 4566
MLT 646 Among a prees, of hym that hath be lad 4568
MLT 648 And swich a colour in his face hath had 4570
MLT 662 " Now hastily do fecche a book, " quod he, 4584
MLT 666 A Britoun book, written with Evaungiles, 4588
MLT 670 That doun he fil atones as a stoon, 4592
MLT 673 A voys was herd in general audience, 4594
MLT 693 And thus hath Crist ymaad Custance a queene. 4614
MLT 699 Hir thoughte a despit that he sholde take 4620
MLT 700 So strange a creature unto his make. 4622
MLT 702 Maken so long a tale as of the corn. 4624
MLT 705 Who bloweth in a trumpe or in an horn? 4626
MLT 713 And leye a lite hir hoolynesse aside, 4634
MLT 715 On hire he gat a knave child anon, 4636
MLT 716 And to a bisshop, and his constable eke, 4638
MLT 722 The tyme is come a knave child she beer; 4644
MLT 724 This constable dooth forth come a messageer, 4646
MLT 745 Out of his box, whil he sleep as a swyn; 4666
MLT 751 Of so horrible a feendly creature 4672
MLT 774 Thy mynde is lorn, thou janglest as a jay, 4696
MLT 775 Thy face is turned in a newe array. 4696
MLT 798 Thre dayes and o quarter of a tyde; 4720
MLT 812 So ful of synne is many a creature? 4734
MLT 822 And Custance, with a deedly pale face, 4744
MLT 844 For which thy child was on a croys yrent. 4766
MLT 911 Doun fro the castel comth ther many a wight 4832
MLT 913 But shortly, from the castel, on a nyght, 4834
MLT 915 A theef, that hadde reneyed oure creance, 4836
MLT 949 And somtyme est, ful many a wery day, 4870
MLT 953 Now lat us stynte of Custance but a throwe, 4874
MLT 957 Doon to his doghter by a fals traytour, 4878
MLT 965 Ful many a day; but shortly -- this is th' ende -- 4886
MLT 989 Upon a day fil in swich repentance 4910
MLT 1001 As to doon any kyng a reverence. 4922
MLT 1005 And so bifel that in a day or two 4926
MLT 1020 A mooder he hath, but fader hath he noon 4942
MLT 1021 That I of woot " -- and shortly, in a stounde, 4942
MLT 1024 " So vertuous a lyvere in my lyf 4946
MLT 1027 I dar wel seyn hir hadde levere a knyf 4948
MLT 1028 Thurghout hir brest, than ben a womman wikke; 4950
MLT 1031 As possible is a creature to be. 4952
MLT 1055 And she, for sorwe, as doumb stant as a tree, 4976
MLT 1075 And swich a blisse is ther bitwix hem two 4996
MLT 1120 A thousand foold wel moore than I kan telle. 5042
MLT 1143 Whan passed was a yeer, evene as I gesse, 5064
GP 19 Bifil that in that seson on a day, 5102
GP 24 Wel nyne and twenty in a compaignye 5108
GP 42 And at a knyght than wol I first bigynne. 5126
GP 43 A KNYGHT ther was, and that a worthy man, 5126
GP 43 A KNYGHT ther was, and that a worthy man, 5126
GP 60 At many a noble armee hadde he be. 5144
GP 67 And everemoore he hadde a sovereyn prys. 5150
GP 69 And of his port as meeke as is a mayde. 5152
GP 72 He was a verray, parfit gentil knyght. 5156
GP 75 Of fustian he wered a gypon 5158
GP 79 With hym ther was his sone, a yong SQUIER, 5162
GP 80 A lovyere and a lusty bacheler, 5164
GP 80 A lovyere and a lusty bacheler, 5164
GP 89 Embrouded was he, as it were a meede 5172
GP 98 He sleep namoore than dooth a nyghtyngale. 5182
GP 101 A YEMAN hadde he and servantz namo 5184
GP 104 A sheef of pecok arwes, bright and kene, 5188
GP 108 And in his hand he baar a myghty bowe. 5192
GP 109 A not heed hadde he, with a broun visage. 5192
GP 109 A not heed hadde he, with a broun visage. 5192
GP 111 Upon his arm he baar a gay bracer, 5194
GP 112 And by his syde a swerd and a bokeler, 5196
GP 112 And by his syde a swerd and a bokeler, 5196
GP 113 And on that oother syde a gay daggere 5196
GP 115 A Cristopher on his brest of silver sheene. 5198
GP 117 A forster was he, soothly, as I gesse. 5200
GP 118 Ther was also a Nonne, a PRIORESSE, 5202
GP 118 Ther was also a Nonne, a PRIORESSE, 5202
GP 130 Wel koude she carie a morsel and wel kepe 5214
GP 144 She wolde wepe, if that she saugh a mous 5228
GP 145 Kaught in a trappe, if it were deed or bledde. 5228
GP 149 Or if men smoot it with a yerde smerte; 5232
GP 154 But sikerly she hadde a fair forheed; 5238
GP 155 It was almoost a spanne brood, I trowe; 5238
GP 159 A peire of bedes, gauded al with grene, 5242
GP 160 And theron heng a brooch of gold ful sheene, 5244
GP 161 On which ther was first write a crowned A, 5244
GP 161 On which ther was first write a crowned A, 5244
GP 165 A MONK ther was, a fair for the maistrie, 5248
GP 165 A MONK ther was, a fair for the maistrie, 5248
GP 167 A manly man, to been an abbot able. 5250
GP 168 Ful many a deyntee hors hadde he in stable, 5252
GP 170 Gynglen in a whistlynge wynd als cleere 5254
GP 177 He yaf nat of that text a pulled hen, 5260
GP 179 Ne that a monk, whan he is recchelees, 5262
GP 180 Is likned til a fissh that is waterlees -- 5264
GP 181 This is to seyn, a monk out of his cloystre. 5264
GP 185 Upon a book in cloystre alwey to poure, 5268
GP 189 Therfore he was a prikasour aright: 5272
GP 194 With grys, and that the fyneste of a lond; 5278
GP 196 He hadde of gold ywroght a ful curious pyn; 5280
GP 197 A love-knotte in the gretter ende ther was. 5280
GP 200 He was a lord ful fat and in good poynt; 5284
GP 202 That stemed as a forneys of a leed; 5286
GP 202 That stemed as a forneys of a leed; 5286
GP 204 Now certeinly he was a fair prelaat; 5288
GP 205 He was nat pale as a forpyned goost. 5288
GP 206 A fat swan loved he best of any roost. 5290
GP 207 His palfrey was as broun as is a berye. 5290
GP 208 A FRERE ther was, a wantowne and a merye, 5292
GP 208 A FRERE ther was, a wantowne and a merye, 5292
GP 208 A FRERE ther was, a wantowne and a merye, 5292
GP 209 A lymytour, a ful solempne man. 5292
GP 209 A lymytour, a ful solempne man. 5292
GP 212 He hadde maad ful many a mariage 5296
GP 214 Unto his ordre he was a noble post. 5298
GP 219 As seyde hymself, moore than a curat, 5302
GP 224 Ther as he wiste to have a good pitaunce. 5308
GP 225 For unto a povre ordre for to yive 5308
GP 226 Is signe that a man is wel yshryve; 5310
GP 228 He wiste that a man was repentaunt; 5312
GP 229 For many a man so hard is of his herte, 5312
GP 235 And certeinly he hadde a murye note: 5318
GP 236 Wel koude he synge and pleyen on a rote; 5320
GP 239 Therto he strong was as a champioun. 5322
GP 242 Bet than a lazar or a beggestere, 5326
GP 242 Bet than a lazar or a beggestere, 5326
GP 243 For unto swich a worthy man as he 5326
GP 252a [And yaf a certeyn ferme for the graunt; 5336
GP 253 For thogh a wydwe hadde noght a sho, 5338
GP 253 For thogh a wydwe hadde noght a sho, 5338
GP 255 Yet wolde he have a ferthyng, er he wente. 5340
GP 257 And rage he koude, as it were right a whelp. 5342
GP 259 For ther he was nat lyk a cloysterer 5344
GP 260 With a thredbare cope, as is a povre scoler, 5346
GP 260 With a thredbare cope, as is a povre scoler, 5346
GP 261 But he was lyk a maister or a pope. 5346
GP 261 But he was lyk a maister or a pope. 5346
GP 263 That rounded as a belle out of the presse. 5348
GP 270 A MARCHANT was ther with a forked berd, 5356
GP 270 A MARCHANT was ther with a forked berd, 5356
GP 272 Upon his heed a Flaundryssh bever hat, 5358
GP 283 For sothe he was a worthy man with alle, 5368
GP 285 A CLERK ther was of Oxenford also, 5370
GP 287 As leene was his hors as is a rake, 5372
GP 297 But al be that he was a philosophre, 5382
GP 309 A SERGEANT OF THE LAWE, war and wys, 5394
GP 318 So greet a purchasour was nowher noon: 5404
GP 321 Nowher so bisy a man as he ther nas, 5406
GP 325 Therto he koude endite and make a thyng, 5410
GP 328 He rood but hoomly in a medlee cote, 5414
GP 329 Girt with a ceint of silk, with barres smale; 5414
GP 331 A FRANKELEYN was in his compaignye. 5416
GP 334 Wel loved he by the morwe a sop in wyn; 5420
GP 339 An housholdere, and that a greet, was he; 5424
GP 342 A bettre envyned man was nowher noon. 5428
GP 349 Ful many a fat partrich hadde he in muwe, 5434
GP 350 And many a breem and many a luce in stuwe. 5436
GP 350 And many a breem and many a luce in stuwe. 5436
GP 357 An anlaas and a gipser al of silk 5442
GP 359 A shirreve hadde he been, and a contour. 5444
GP 359 A shirreve hadde he been, and a contour. 5444
GP 360 Was nowher swich a worthy vavasour. 5446
GP 361 AN HABERDASSHERE and a CARPENTER, 5446
GP 362 A WEBBE, a DYERE, and a TAPYCER -- 5448
GP 362 A WEBBE, a DYERE, and a TAPYCER -- 5448
GP 362 A WEBBE, a DYERE, and a TAPYCER -- 5448
GP 364 Of a solempne and a greet fraternitee. 5450
GP 364 Of a solempne and a greet fraternitee. 5450
GP 369 Wel semed ech of hem a fair burgeys 5454
GP 370 To sitten in a yeldehalle on a deys. 5456
GP 370 To sitten in a yeldehalle on a deys. 5456
GP 378 And have a mantel roialliche ybore. 5464
GP 379 A COOK they hadde with hem for the nones 5464
GP 382 Wel koude he knowe a draughte of Londoun ale. 5468
GP 384 Maken mortreux, and wel bake a pye. 5470
GP 386 That on his shyne a mormal hadde he. 5472
GP 388 A SHIPMAN was ther, wonynge fer by weste; 5474
GP 390 He rood upon a rouncy, as he kouthe, 5476
GP 391 In a gowne of faldyng to the knee. 5476
GP 392 A daggere hangynge on a laas hadde he 5478
GP 392 A daggere hangynge on a laas hadde he 5478
GP 395 And certeinly he was a good felawe. 5480
GP 396 Ful many a draughte of wyn had he ydrawe 5482
GP 406 With many a tempest hadde his berd been shake. 5492
GP 411 With us ther was a DOCTOUR OF PHISIK; 5496
GP 415 He kepte his pacient a ful greet deel 5500
GP 422 He was a verray, parfit praktisour: 5508
GP 443 For gold in phisik is a cordial, 5528
GP 445 A good WIF was ther OF biside BATHE, 5530
GP 455 That on a Sonday weren upon hir heed. 5540
GP 459 She was a worthy womman al hir lyve: 5544
GP 464 She hadde passed many a straunge strem; 5550
GP 471 As brood as is a bokeler or a targe; 5556
GP 471 As brood as is a bokeler or a targe; 5556
GP 472 A foot-mantel aboute hir hipes large, 5558
GP 473 And on hir feet a paire of spores sharpe. 5558
GP 477 A good man was ther of religioun, 5562
GP 478 And was a povre PERSOUN OF A TOUN, 5564
GP 478 And was a povre PERSOUN OF A TOUN, 5564
GP 480 He was also a lerned man, a clerk, 5566
GP 480 He was also a lerned man, a clerk, 5566
GP 495 Upon his feet, and in his hand a staf. 5580
GP 501 For if a preest be foul, on whom we truste, 5586
GP 502 No wonder is a lewed man to ruste; 5588
GP 503 And shame it is, if a prest take keep, 5588
GP 504 A shiten shepherde and a clene sheep. 5590
GP 504 A shiten shepherde and a clene sheep. 5590
GP 505 Wel oghte a preest ensample for to yive, 5590
GP 510 To seken hym a chaunterie for soules, 5596
GP 511 Or with a bretherhed to been withholde; 5596
GP 514 He was a shepherde and noght a mercenarie. 5600
GP 514 He was a shepherde and noght a mercenarie. 5600
GP 524 A bettre preest I trowe that nowher noon ys. 5610
GP 526 Ne maked him a spiced conscience, 5612
GP 529 With hym ther was a PLOWMAN, was his brother, 5614
GP 530 That hadde ylad of dong ful many a fother; 5616
GP 531 A trewe swynkere and a good was he, 5616
GP 531 A trewe swynkere and a good was he, 5616
GP 541 In a tabard he rood upon a mere. 5626
GP 541 In a tabard he rood upon a mere. 5626
GP 542 Ther was also a REVE, and a MILLERE, 5628
GP 542 Ther was also a REVE, and a MILLERE, 5628
GP 543 A SOMNOUR, and a PARDONER also, 5628
GP 543 A SOMNOUR, and a PARDONER also, 5628
GP 544 A MAUNCIPLE, and myself -- ther were namo. 5630
GP 545 The MILLERE was a stout carl for the nones; 5630
GP 549 He was short-sholdred, brood, a thikke knarre; 5634
GP 551 Or breke it at a rennyng with his heed. 5636
GP 553 And therto brood, as though it were a spade. 5638
GP 555 A werte, and theron stood a toft of herys, 5640
GP 555 A werte, and theron stood a toft of herys, 5640
GP 556 Reed as the brustles of a sowes erys; 5642
GP 558 A swerd and a bokeler bar he by his syde. 5644
GP 558 A swerd and a bokeler bar he by his syde. 5644
GP 559 His mouth as greet was as a greet forneys. 5644
GP 560 He was a janglere and a goliardeys, 5646
GP 560 He was a janglere and a goliardeys, 5646
GP 563 And yet he hadde a thombe of gold, pardee. 5648
GP 564 A whit cote and a blew hood wered he. 5650
GP 564 A whit cote and a blew hood wered he. 5650
GP 565 A baggepipe wel koude he blowe and sowne, 5650
GP 567 A gentil MAUNCIPLE was ther of a temple, 5652
GP 567 A gentil MAUNCIPLE was ther of a temple, 5652
GP 573 Now is nat that of God a ful fair grace 5658
GP 574 That swich a lewed mannes wit shal pace 5660
GP 578 Of which ther were a duszeyne in that hous 5664
GP 584 And able for to helpen al a shire 5670
GP 587 The REVE was a sclendre colerik man. 5672
GP 590 His top was dokked lyk a preest biforn. 5676
GP 592 Ylyk a staf; ther was no calf ysene. 5678
GP 593 Wel koude he kepe a gerner and a bynne; 5678
GP 593 Wel koude he kepe a gerner and a bynne; 5678
GP 612 And have a thank, and yet a cote and hood. 5698
GP 612 And have a thank, and yet a cote and hood. 5698
GP 613 In youthe he hadde lerned a good myster: 5698
GP 614 He was a wel good wrighte, a carpenter. 5700
GP 614 He was a wel good wrighte, a carpenter. 5700
GP 615 This Reve sat upon a ful good stot 5700
GP 617 A long surcote of pers upon he hade, 5702
GP 618 And by his syde he baar a rusty blade. 5704
GP 620 Biside a toun men clepen Baldeswelle. 5706
GP 621 Tukked he was as is a frere aboute, 5706
GP 623 A SOMONOUR was ther with us in that place, 5708
GP 624 That hadde a fyr-reed cherubynnes face, 5710
GP 626 As hoot he was and lecherous as a sparwe, 5712
GP 639 A fewe termes hadde he, two or thre, 5724
GP 642 And eek ye knowen wel how that a jay 5728
GP 647 He was a gentil harlot and a kynde; 5732
GP 647 He was a gentil harlot and a kynde; 5732
GP 648 A bettre felawe sholde men noght fynde. 5734
GP 649 He wolde suffre for a quart of wyn 5734
GP 650 A good felawe to have his concubyn 5736
GP 651 A twelf month, and excuse hym atte fulle; 5736
GP 652 Ful prively a fynch eek koude he pulle. 5738
GP 653 And if he foond owher a good felawe, 5738
GP 656 But if a mannes soule were in his purs; 5742
GP 662 And also war hym of a Significavit. 5748
GP 666 A gerland hadde he set upon his heed, 5752
GP 668 A bokeleer hadde he maad hym of a cake. 5754
GP 668 A bokeleer hadde he maad hym of a cake. 5754
GP 669 With hym ther rood a gentil PARDONER 5754
GP 673 This Somonour bar to hym a stif burdoun; 5758
GP 674 Was nevere trompe of half so greet a soun. 5760
GP 676 But smothe it heeng as dooth a strike of flex; 5762
GP 685 A vernycle hadde he sowed upon his cappe. 5770
GP 688 A voys he hadde as smal as hath a goot. 5774
GP 688 A voys he hadde as smal as hath a goot. 5774
GP 691 I trowe he were a geldyng or a mare. 5776
GP 691 I trowe he were a geldyng or a mare. 5776
GP 694 For in his male he hadde a pilwe-beer, 5780
GP 696 He seyde he hadde a gobet of the seyl 5782
GP 699 He hadde a croys of latoun ful of stones, 5784
GP 700 And in a glas he hadde pigges bones. 5786
GP 702 A povre person dwellynge upon lond, 5788
GP 703 Upon a day he gat hym moore moneye 5788
GP 708 He was in chirche a noble ecclesiaste. 5794
GP 709 Wel koude he rede a lessoun or a storie, 5794
GP 709 Wel koude he rede a lessoun or a storie, 5794
GP 715 Now have I toold you soothly, in a clause, 5800
GP 731 Whoso shal telle a tale after a man, 5816
GP 731 Whoso shal telle a tale after a man, 5816
GP 733 Everich a word, if it be in his charge, 5818
GP 751 A semely man OURE HOOSTE was withalle 5836
GP 752 For to been a marchal in an halle. 5838
GP 753 A large man he was with eyen stepe -- 5838
GP 754 A fairer burgeys was ther noon in Chepe -- 5840
GP 757 Eek therto he was right a myrie man; 5842
GP 764 I saugh nat this yeer so myrie a compaignye 5850
GP 767 And of a myrthe I am right now bythoght, 5852
GP 774 To ride by the weye doumb as a stoon; 5860
GP 799 Shal have a soper at oure aller cost 5884
GP 815 And sette a soper at a certeyn pris, 5900
GP 815 And sette a soper at a certeyn pris, 5900
GP 824 And gadrede us togidre alle in a flok, 5910
GP 825 And forth we riden a litel moore than paas 5910
GP 854 What, welcome be the cut, a Goddes name! 5940
GP 857 And he bigan with right a myrie cheere 5942
KnT 860 Ther was a duc that highte Theseus; 5946
KnT 862 And in his tyme swich a conquerour 5948
KnT 864 Ful many a riche contree hadde he wonne; 5950
KnT 886 I have, God woot, a large feeld to ere, 5972
KnT 898 A compaignye of ladyes, tweye and tweye, 5984
KnT 900 But swich a cry and swich a wo they make 5986
KnT 900 But swich a cry and swich a wo they make 5986
KnT 913 Whan she hadde swowned with a deedly cheere, 5998
KnT 916 Victorie, and as a conqueror to lyven, 6002
KnT 923 That she ne hath been a duchesse or a queene. 6008
KnT 923 That she ne hath been a duchesse or a queene. 6008
KnT 969 Ne take his ese fully half a day, 6054
KnT 984 Faire in a feeld, ther as he thoughte to fighte. 6070
KnT 987 He faught, and slough hym manly as a knyght 6072
KnT 1010 Thurgh-girt with many a grevous blody wounde, 6096
KnT 1027 With laurer crowned as a conquerour; 6112
KnT 1030 And in a tour, in angwissh and in wo, 6116
KnT 1034 Till it fil ones, in a morwe of May, 6120
KnT 1049 Hir yelow heer was broyded in a tresse 6134
KnT 1050 Bihynde hir bak, a yerde long, I gesse. 6136
KnT 1054 To make a subtil gerland for hire hede; 6140
KnT 1065 Was risen and romed in a chambre an heigh, 6150
KnT 1075 That thurgh a wyndow, thikke of many a barre 6160
KnT 1075 That thurgh a wyndow, thikke of many a barre 6160
KnT 1078 And therwithal he bleynte and cride, " A! " 6164
KnT 1094 Thow hast a veyn ymaginacioun. 6180
KnT 1117 And with a sigh he seyde pitously, 6202
KnT 1149 For which thou art ybounden as a knyght 6234
KnT 1157 Wheither she be a womman or goddesse! 6242
KnT 1159 And myn is love as to a creature; 6244
KnT 1164 That `who shal yeve a lovere any lawe?' 6250
KnT 1165 Love is a gretter lawe, by my pan, 6250
KnT 1169 A man moot nedes love, maugree his heed; 6254
KnT 1179 Ther cam a kyte, whil that they were so wrothe, 6264
KnT 1189 But to th' effect. It happed on a day, 6274
KnT 1191 A worthy duc that highte Perotheus, 6276
KnT 1208 In swich a gyse as I you tellen shal. 6294
KnT 1215 That with a swerd he sholde lese his heed. 6300
KnT 1219 How greet a sorwe suffreth now Arcite! 6304
KnT 1241 And art a knyght, a worthy and an able, 6326
KnT 1241 And art a knyght, a worthy and an able, 6326
KnT 1253 That yeveth hem ful ofte in many a gyse 6338
KnT 1261 We faren as he that dronke is as a mous. 6346
KnT 1262 A dronke man woot wel he hath an hous, 6348
KnT 1264 And to a dronke man the wey is slider. 6350
KnT 1269 That wende and hadde a greet opinioun 6354
KnT 1287 And make a werre so sharp on this citee 6372
KnT 1293 And art a lord, greet is thyn avauntage 6378
KnT 1294 Moore than is myn, that sterve here in a cage. 6380
KnT 1318 Ther as a beest may al his lust fulfille. 6404
KnT 1319 And whan a beest is deed he hath no peyne; 6404
KnT 1325 Allas, I se a serpent or a theef, 6410
KnT 1325 Allas, I se a serpent or a theef, 6410
KnT 1326 That many a trewe man hath doon mescheef, 6412
KnT 1334 Now wol I stynte of Palamon a lite, 6420
KnT 1356 Ful ofte a day he swelte and seyde " Allas! " 6442
KnT 1362 That lene he wex and drye as is a shaft; 6448
KnT 1381 Whan he endured hadde a yeer or two 6466
KnT 1384 Upon a nyght in sleep as he hym leyde, 6470
KnT 1399 And with that word he caughte a greet mirour, 6484
KnT 1409 And cladde hym as a povre laborer, 6494
KnT 1410 And al allone, save oonly a squier 6496
KnT 1414 And to the court he wente upon a day, 6500
KnT 1418 He fil in office with a chamberleyn 6504
KnT 1426 A yeer or two he was in this servyse, 6512
KnT 1429 But half so wel biloved a man as he 6514
KnT 1433 They seyden that it were a charitee 6518
KnT 1437 And thus withinne a while his name is spronge, 6522
KnT 1440 That of his chambre he made hym a squier, 6526
KnT 1450 And speke I wole of Palamon a lite. 6536
KnT 1457 And eek therto he is a prisoner 6542
KnT 1458 Perpetuelly, noght oonly for a yer. 6544
KnT 1466 As, whan a thyng is shapen, it shal be -- 6552
KnT 1468 By helpyng of a freend, brak his prisoun 6554
KnT 1471 Of a clarree maad of a certeyn wyn, 6556
KnT 1471 Of a clarree maad of a certeyn wyn, 6556
KnT 1478 And til a grove faste ther bisyde 6564
KnT 1502 He on a courser, startlynge as the fir, 6588
KnT 1504 Out of the court, were it a myle or tweye. 6590
KnT 1507 To maken hym a gerland of the greves, 6592
KnT 1513 And from his courser, with a lusty herte, 6598
KnT 1515 And in a path he rometh up and doun, 6600
KnT 1517 Was in a bussh, that no man myghte hym se, 6602
KnT 1523 It is ful fair a man to bere hym evene, 6608
KnT 1530 Into a studie he fil sodeynly, 6616
KnT 1533 Now up, now doun, as boket in a welle. 6618
KnT 1558 Now highte I Philostrate, noght worth a myte. 6644
KnT 1570 Ne sette I nat the montance of a tare, 6656
KnT 1572 And with that word he fil doun in a traunce 6658
KnT 1573 A longe tyme, and after he up sterte. 6658
KnT 1575 He felte a coold swerd sodeynliche glyde, 6660
KnT 1608 But for as muche thou art a worthy knyght 6694
KnT 1612 That heere I wol be founden as a knyght, 6698
KnT 1639 That stondeth at the gappe with a spere, 6724
KnT 1656 In his fightyng were a wood leon, 6742
KnT 1657 And as a crueel tigre was Arcite; 6742
KnT 1667 The contrarie of a thyng by ye or nay, 6752
KnT 1668 Yet somtyme it shal fallen on a day 6754
KnT 1669 That falleth nat eft withinne a thousand yeer. 6754
KnT 1693 And over a brook, and so forth on his weye. 6778
KnT 1694 This duc wol han a cours at hym or tweye 6780
KnT 1705 And at a stert he was bitwix hem two, 6790
KnT 1706 And pulled out a swerd and cride, " Hoo! 6792
KnT 1713 As it were in a lystes roially. " 6798
KnT 1719 And as thou art a rightful lord and juge, 6804
KnT 1729 Thus hath he japed thee ful many a yer, 6814
KnT 1743 And seyde, " This is a short conclusioun. 6828
KnT 1752 That evere swich a chaunce sholde falle, 6838
KnT 1763 He hath considered shortly, in a clause, 6848
KnT 1774 Upon a lord that wol have no mercy, 6860
KnT 1775 But been a leon, bothe in word and dede, 6860
KnT 1777 As wel as to a proud despitous man 6862
KnT 1785 " The god of love, a benedicite! 6870
KnT 1786 How myghty and how greet a lord is he! 6872
KnT 1788 He may be cleped a god for his myracles, 6874
KnT 1799 Who may been a fool but if he love? 6884
KnT 1810 By God, than woot a cokkow or an hare! 6896
KnT 1812 A man moot ben a fool, or yong or oold -- 6898
KnT 1812 A man moot ben a fool, or yong or oold -- 6898
KnT 1814 For in my tyme a servant was I oon. 6900
KnT 1816 And woot hou soore it kan a man distreyne, 6902
KnT 1830 Though that she were a queene or a princesse, 6916
KnT 1830 Though that she were a queene or a princesse, 6916
KnT 1855 Upon my trouthe, and as I am a knyght, 6940
KnT 1861 To whom that Fortune yeveth so fair a grace. 6946
KnT 1874 Whan Theseus hath doon so fair a grace? 6960
KnT 1885 That swich a noble theatre as it was 6970
KnT 1887 The circuit a myle was aboute, 6972
KnT 1891 That whan a man was set on o degree, 6976
KnT 1893 Estward ther stood a gate of marbul whit, 6978
KnT 1895 And shortly to concluden, swich a place 6980
KnT 1908 That coste largely of gold a fother. 6994
KnT 1909 And northward, in a touret on the wal, 6994
KnT 1929 That wered of yelewe gooldes a gerland, 7014
KnT 1930 And a cokkow sittynge on hir hand; 7016
KnT 1954 And though I koude rekene a thousand mo. 7040
KnT 1959 A citole in hir right hand hadde she, 7044
KnT 1961 A rose gerland, fressh and wel smellynge; 7046
KnT 1966 A bowe he bar and arwes brighte and kene. 7052
KnT 1975 First on the wal was peynted a forest, 7060
KnT 1979 In which ther ran a rumbel in a swough, 7064
KnT 1979 In which ther ran a rumbel in a swough, 7064
KnT 1980 As though a storm sholde bresten every bough. 7066
KnT 1981 And dounward from an hille, under a bente, 7066
KnT 1985 And therout came a rage and swich a veze 7070
KnT 1985 And therout came a rage and swich a veze 7070
KnT 2014 A thousand slayn, and nat of qualm ystorve; 7100
KnT 2027 And al above, depeynted in a tour, 7112
KnT 2030 Hangynge by a soutil twynes threed. 7116
KnT 2041 The statue of Mars upon a carte stood 7126
KnT 2047 A wolf ther stood biforn hym at his feet 7132
KnT 2048 With eyen rede, and of a man he eet; 7134
KnT 2058 Was turned from a womman til a bere, 7144
KnT 2058 Was turned from a womman til a bere, 7144
KnT 2061 Hir sone is eek a sterre, as men may see. 7146
KnT 2062 Ther saugh I Dane, yturned til a tree -- 7148
KnT 2069 Yet peynted was a litel forther moor 7154
KnT 2077 And undernethe hir feet she hadde a moone -- 7162
KnT 2080 With bowe in honde and arwes in a cas. 7166
KnT 2083 A womman travaillynge was hire biforn; 7168
KnT 2088 With many a floryn he the hewes boghte. 7174
KnT 2093 But stynte I wole of Theseus a lite, 7178
KnT 2101 And sikerly ther trowed many a man 7186
KnT 2105 Nas of so fewe so noble a compaignye. 7190
KnT 2107 And wolde, his thankes, han a passant name, 7192
KnT 2110 For if ther fille tomorwe swich a cas, 7196
KnT 2115 To fighte for a lady, benedicitee! 7200
KnT 2116 It were a lusty sighte for to see. 7202
KnT 2120 And in a brestplate and a light gypoun; 7206
KnT 2120 And in a brestplate and a light gypoun; 7206
KnT 2121 And som wol have a paire plates large; 7206
KnT 2122 And som wol have a Pruce sheeld or a targe; 7208
KnT 2122 And som wol have a Pruce sheeld or a targe; 7208
KnT 2124 And have an ax, and som a mace of steel -- 7210
KnT 2133 And lik a grifphon looked he aboute, 7218
KnT 2138 Ful hye upon a chaar of gold stood he, 7224
KnT 2142 He hadde a beres skyn, col-blak for old. 7228
KnT 2145 A wrethe of gold, arm-greet, of huge wighte, 7230
KnT 2157 Upon a steede bay trapped in steel, 7242
KnT 2163 A mantelet upon his shulder hangynge, 7248
KnT 2169 A fewe frakenes in his face yspreynd, 7254
KnT 2171 And as a leon he his lookyng caste. 7256
KnT 2174 His voys was as a trompe thonderynge. 7260
KnT 2176 A gerland, fressh and lusty for to sene. 7262
KnT 2186 Ful many a tame leon and leopart. 7272
KnT 2217 And in hir houre he walketh forth a pas 7302
KnT 2255 Thanne preye I thee, tomorwe with a spere 7340
KnT 2266 And made a signe, wherby that he took 7352
KnT 2268 For thogh the signe shewed a delay, 7354
KnT 2283 Hir body wessh with water of a welle. 7368
KnT 2286 And yet it were a game to heeren al. 7372
KnT 2288 But it is good a man been at his large. 7374
KnT 2290 A coroune of a grene ook cerial 7376
KnT 2290 A coroune of a grene ook cerial 7376
KnT 2301 Ful many a yeer, and woost what I desire, 7386
KnT 2305 Desire to ben a mayden al my lyf, 7390
KnT 2308 A mayde, and love huntynge and venerye, 7394
KnT 2310 And noght to ben a wyf and be with childe. 7396
KnT 2330 And whil I lyve, a mayde I wol thee serve. " 7416
KnT 2333 But sodeynly she saugh a sighte queynte, 7418
KnT 2337 And as it queynte it made a whistelynge, 7422
KnT 2360 And forth she wente and made a vanysshynge; 7446
KnT 2388 Although thee ones on a tyme mysfille, 7474
KnT 2427 A sweete smel the ground anon up yaf, 7512
KnT 2432 And with that soun he herde a murmurynge 7518
KnT 2494 And to the paleys rood ther many a route 7580
KnT 2520 " He hath a sparth of twenty pound of wighte. " 7606
KnT 2528 Duc Theseus was at a wyndow set, 7614
KnT 2529 Arrayed right as he were a god in trone. 7614
KnT 2533 An heraud on a scaffold made an " Oo! " 7618
KnT 2549 But o cours with a sharpe ygrounde spere; 7634
KnT 2563 " God save swich a lord, that is so good 7648
KnT 2569 Ful lik a lord this noble duc gan ryde, 7654
KnT 2614 He rolleth under foot as dooth a bal; 7700
KnT 2623 Ful ofte a day han thise Thebanes two 7708
KnT 2646 Is born out of his sadel a swerdes lengthe, 7732
KnT 2660 Anon ther is a noyse of peple bigonne 7746
KnT 2674 But herkneth me, and stynteth noyse a lite, 7760
KnT 2675 Which a myracle ther bifel anon. 7760
KnT 2677 And on a courser, for to shewe his face, 7762
KnT 2680 And she agayn hym caste a freendlich ye 7766
KnT 2684 Out of the ground a furie infernal sterte, 7770
KnT 2697 And in a bed ybrought ful faire and blyve, 7782
KnT 2710 That with a spere was thirled his brest boon. 7796
KnT 2720 But as a justes or a tourneiynge; 7806
KnT 2720 But as a justes or a tourneiynge; 7806
KnT 2736 And fully heeld a feeste dayes three, 7822
KnT 2738 Out of his toun a journee largely. 7824
KnT 2784 Had strif and rancour many a day agon 7870
KnT 2787 To speken of a servaunt proprely, 7872
KnT 2796 And if that evere ye shul ben a wyf, 7882
KnT 2847 This world nys but a thurghfare ful of wo, 7932
KnT 2863 He wolde make a fyr in which the office 7948
KnT 2866 The okes olde, and leye hem on a rewe 7952
KnT 2871 After a beere, and it al overspradde 7956
KnT 2875 Eek on his heed a coroune of laurer grene, 7960
KnT 2876 And in his hond a swerd ful bright and kene. 7962
KnT 2897 And riden forth a paas with sorweful cheere 7982
KnT 2918 Of stree first ther was leyd ful many a lode. 8004
KnT 2934 And thanne with drye stikkes cloven a thre, 8020
KnT 2937 And gerlandes, hangynge with ful many a flour; 8022
KnT 2953 Upon the left hand, with a loud shoutynge, 8038
KnT 2970 Thanne semed me ther was a parlement 8056
KnT 2982 And Theseus abiden hadde a space 8068
KnT 2985 And with a sad visage he siked stille, 8070
KnT 3005 Wel may men knowe, but it be a fool, 8090
KnT 3008 Of no partie or cantel of a thyng, 8094
KnT 3009 But of a thyng that parfit is and stable, 8094
KnT 3017 " Loo the ook, that hath so long a norisshynge 8102
KnT 3019 And hath so long a lif, as we may see, 8104
KnT 3030 He moot be deed, the kyng as shal a page; 8116
KnT 3047 And certeinly a man hath moost honour 8132
KnT 3055 Thanne is it best, as for a worthy fame, 8140
KnT 3064 Kan he hem thank? Nay, God woot, never a deel, 8150
KnT 3084 He is a kynges brother sone, pardee; 8170
KnT 3085 And though he were a povre bacheler, 8170
KnT 3086 Syn he hath served yow so many a yeer, 8172
MilT 3111 That he ne seyde it was a noble storie 8196
MilT 3126 I kan a noble tale for the nones, 8212
MilT 3134 Oure Hoost answerde, " Tel on, a devel wey! 8220
MilT 3135 Thou art a fool; thy wit is overcome. " 8220
MilT 3137 But first I make a protestacioun 8222
MilT 3141 For I wol telle a legende and a lyf 8226
MilT 3141 For I wol telle a legende and a lyf 8226
MilT 3142 Bothe of a carpenter and of his wyf, 8228
MilT 3143 How that a clerk hath set the wrightes cappe. " 8228
MilT 3146 It is a synne and eek a greet folye 8232
MilT 3146 It is a synne and eek a greet folye 8232
MilT 3155 And evere a thousand goode ayeyns oon badde. 8240
MilT 3158 I have a wyf, pardee, as wel as thow; 8244
MilT 3182 The Millere is a cherl; ye knowe wel this. 8268
MilT 3188 A riche gnof, that gestes heeld to bord, 8274
MilT 3189 And of his craft he was a carpenter. 8274
MilT 3190 With hym ther was dwellynge a poure scoler, 8276
MilT 3193 And koude a certeyn of conclusiouns, 8278
MilT 3202 And lyk a mayden meke for to see. 8288
MilT 3203 A chambre hadde he in that hostelrye 8288
MilT 3212 His presse ycovered with a faldyng reed; 8298
MilT 3213 And al above ther lay a gay sautrie, 8298
MilT 3221 This carpenter hadde wedded newe a wyf, 8306
MilT 3226 And demed hymself been lik a cokewold. 8312
MilT 3235 A ceynt she werede, barred al of silk, 8320
MilT 3236 A barmclooth as whit as morne milk 8322
MilT 3237 Upon hir lendes, ful of many a goore. 8322
MilT 3244 And sikerly she hadde a likerous ye; 8330
MilT 3249 And softer than the wolle is of a wether. 8334
MilT 3250 And by hir girdel heeng a purs of lether, 8336
MilT 3254 So gay a popelote or swich a wenche. 8340
MilT 3254 So gay a popelote or swich a wenche. 8340
MilT 3258 As any swalwe sittynge on a berne. 8344
MilT 3263 Wynsynge she was, as is a joly colt, 8348
MilT 3264 Long as a mast, and upright as a bolt. 8350
MilT 3264 Long as a mast, and upright as a bolt. 8350
MilT 3265 A brooch she baar upon hir lowe coler, 8350
MilT 3266 As brood as is the boos of a bokeler. 8352
MilT 3268 She was a prymerole, a piggesnye, 8354
MilT 3268 She was a prymerole, a piggesnye, 8354
MilT 3272 That on a day this hende Nicholas 8358
MilT 3282 And she sproong as a colt dooth in the trave, 8368
MilT 3299 " A clerk hadde litherly biset his whyle, 8384
MilT 3300 But if he koude a carpenter bigyle. " 8386
MilT 3302 To wayte a tyme, as I have told biforn. 8388
MilT 3312 Now was ther of that chirche a parissh clerk, 8398
MilT 3315 And strouted as a fanne large and brode; 8400
MilT 3321 Al in a kirtel of a lyght waget; 8406
MilT 3321 Al in a kirtel of a lyght waget; 8406
MilT 3323 And therupon he hadde a gay surplys 8408
MilT 3325 A myrie child he was, so God me save. 8410
MilT 3327 And maken a chartre of lond or acquitaunce. 8412
MilT 3331 And pleyen songes on a smal rubible; 8416
MilT 3332 Therto he song som tyme a loud quynyble; 8418
MilT 3333 And as wel koude he pleye on a giterne. 8418
MilT 3340 Gooth with a sencer on the haliday, 8426
MilT 3342 And many a lovely look on hem he caste, 8428
MilT 3344 To looke on hire hym thoughte a myrie lyf, 8430
MilT 3346 I dar wel seyn, if she hadde been a mous, 8432
MilT 3347 And he a cat, he wolde hire hente anon. 8432
MilT 3349 Hath in his herte swich a love-longynge 8434
MilT 3357 A litel after cokkes hadde ycrowe, 8442
MilT 3358 And dressed hym up by a shot-wyndowe 8444
MilT 3377 He syngeth, brokkynge as a nyghtyngale; 8462
MilT 3384 He pleyeth Herodes upon a scaffold hye. 8470
MilT 3388 He ne hadde for his labour but a scorn. 8474
MilT 3390 And al his ernest turneth til a jape. 8476
MilT 3399 And so bifel it on a Saterday, 8484
MilT 3403 That Nicholas shal shapen hym a wyle 8488
MilT 3411 Bothe mete and drynke for a day or tweye, 8496
MilT 3429 I saugh today a cors yborn to chirche 8514
MilT 3432 " Clepe at his dore, or knokke with a stoon. 8518
MilT 3439 But al for noght; he herde nat a word. 8524
MilT 3440 An hole he foond, ful lowe upon a bord, 8526
MilT 3443 And at the laste he hadde of hym a sight. 8528
MilT 3450 A man woot litel what hym shal bityde. 8536
MilT 3455 Ye, blessed be alwey a lewed man 8540
MilT 3460 Til he was in a marle-pit yfalle; 8546
MilT 3465 Get me a staf, that I may underspore, 8550
MilT 3469 His knave was a strong carl for the nones, 8554
MilT 3497 And broghte of myghty ale a large quart; 8582
MilT 3516 That now a Monday next, at quarter nyght, 8602
MilT 3517 Shal falle a reyn, and that so wilde and wood 8602
MilT 3543 That she hadde had a ship hirself allone. 8628
MilT 3548 A knedyng trogh, or ellis a kymelyn, 8634
MilT 3548 A knedyng trogh, or ellis a kymelyn, 8634
MilT 3550 In which we mowe swymme as in a barge, 8636
MilT 3552 But for a day -- fy on the remenant! 8638
MilT 3560 To han as greet a grace as Noe hadde. 8646
MilT 3586 That noon of us ne speke nat a word, 8672
MilT 3611 Lo, which a greet thyng is affeccioun! 8696
MilT 3619 He siketh with ful many a sory swogh; 8704
MilT 3620 He gooth and geteth hym a knedyng trogh, 8706
MilT 3621 And after that a tubbe and a kymelyn, 8706
MilT 3621 And after that a tubbe and a kymelyn, 8706
MilT 3628 With breed, and chese, and good ale in a jubbe, 8714
MilT 3629 Suffisynge right ynogh as for a day. 8714
MilT 3637 They seten stille wel a furlong way. 8722
MilT 3661 And axed upon cas a cloisterer 8746
MilT 3668 And dwellen at the grange a day or two; 8754
MilT 3683 That is a signe of kissyng atte leeste. 8768
MilT 3684 Al nyght me mette eek I was at a feeste. 8770
MilT 3692 Under his tonge a trewe-love he beer, 8778
MilT 3697 And softe he cougheth with a semy soun: 8782
MilT 3704 I moorne as dooth a lamb after the tete. 8790
MilT 3706 That lik a turtel trewe is my moornynge. 8792
MilT 3707 I may nat ete na moore than a mayde. " 8792
MilT 3712 Go forth thy wey, or I wol caste a ston, 8798
MilT 3713 And lat me slepe, a twenty devel wey! " 8798
MilT 3724 And seyde, " I am a lord at alle degrees; 8810
MilT 3737 For wel he wiste a womman hath no berd. 8822
MilT 3738 He felte a thyng al rough and long yherd, 8824
MilT 3741 And Absolon gooth forth a sory pas. 8826
MilT 3742 " A berd! A berd! " quod hende Nicholas, 8828
MilT 3742 " A berd! A berd! " quod hende Nicholas, 8828
MilT 3756 Of paramours he sette nat a kers, 8842
MilT 3759 And weep as dooth a child that is ybete. 8844
MilT 3760 A softe paas he wente over the strete 8846
MilT 3761 Until a smyth men cleped daun Gerveys, 8846
MilT 3772 This Absolon ne roghte nat a bene 8858
MilT 3780 Or in a poke nobles alle untold, 8866
MilT 3791 That knokketh so? I warante it a theef. " 8876
MilT 3794 Of gold, " quod he, " I have thee broght a ryng. 8880
MilT 3806 This Nicholas anon leet fle a fart 8892
MilT 3807 As greet as it had been a thonder-dent, 8892
MilT 3842 And turned al his harm unto a jape. 8928
RvT 3862 A litel ire is in his herte ylaft; 8948
RvT 3863 He gan to grucche, and blamed it a lite. 8948
RvT 3865 With bleryng of a proud milleres ye, 8950
RvT 3877 For in oure wyl ther stiketh evere a nayl, 8962
RvT 3878 To have an hoor heed and a grene tayl, 8964
RvT 3879 As hath a leek; for thogh oure myght be goon, 8964
RvT 3888 And yet ik have alwey a coltes tooth, 8974
RvT 3889 As many a yeer as it is passed henne 8974
RvT 3900 He gan to speke as lordly as a kyng. 8986
RvT 3903 The devel made a reve for to preche, 8988
RvT 3904 Or of a soutere a shipman or a leche. 8990
RvT 3904 Or of a soutere a shipman or a leche. 8990
RvT 3904 Or of a soutere a shipman or a leche. 8990
RvT 3907 Lo Grenewych, ther many a shrewe is inne! 8992
RvT 3914 How that bigyled was a carpenteer, 9000
RvT 3919 He kan wel in myn eye seen a stalke, 9004
RvT 3920 But in his owene he kan nat seen a balke. " 9006
MLT 25 Wel kan Senec and many a philosophre 9030
MLT 34 Telle us a tale anon, as forward is. 9040
MLT 43 For swich lawe as a man yeveth another wight, 9048
MLT 50 Of olde tyme, as knoweth many a man; 9056
MLT 84 That is so horrible a tale for to rede, 9090
MLT 94 But nathelees, I recche noght a bene 9100
MLT 97 And with that word he, with a sobre cheere, 9102
MLT 132 Nere that a marchant, goon is many a yeere, 9138
MLT 132 Nere that a marchant, goon is many a yeere, 9138
MLT 133 Me taughte a tale, which that ye shal heere. 9138
MLT 134 In Surrye whilom dwelte a compaignye 9140
MLT 149 A certein tyme, as fil to hire plesance. 9154
MLT 157 A doghter hath that, syn the world bigan, 9162
MLT 197 In sterres, many a wynter therbiforn, 9202
MLT 208 To han Custance withinne a litel space, 9214
MLT 213 Many a subtil resoun forth they leyden; 9218
MLT 251 May no man tellen in a litel clause 9256
MLT 252 As was arrayed for so heigh a cause. 9258
MLT 314 Noght whan a roote is of a burthe yknowe? 9320
MLT 314 Noght whan a roote is of a burthe yknowe? 9320
MLT 352 Coold water shal nat greve us but a lite! -- 9358
MLT 353 And I shal swich a feeste and revel make 9358
MLT 357 Thogh she a font-ful water with hire lede. " 9362
MLT 375 She rydeth to the Sowdan on a day, 9380
MLT 387 In Surrye, with a greet solempne route, 9392
MLT 396 Receyveth hire with also glad a cheere 9402
MLT 399 A softe paas solempnely they ryde. 9404
MLT 401 Of which that Lucan maketh swich a boost, 9406
MLT 439 And in a ship al steerelees, God woot, 9444
MLT 442 A certein tresor that she thider ladde, 9448
MLT 459 The white Lamb, that hurt was with a spere, 9464
MLT 466 On many a sory meel now may she bayte; 9472
MLT 510 That thennes wolde it noght of al a tyde; 9516
MLT 519 A maner Latyn corrupt was hir speche, 9524
MLT 537 In orisons, with many a bitter teere, 9542
MLT 557 Toward the see a furlong wey or two, 9562
MLT 577 But kepte it strongly many a wyntres space 9582
MLT 585 And made a yong knyght that dwelte in that toun 9590
MLT 594 And pryvely upon a nyght he crepte 9600
MLT 612 That in a ship was founden this Custance, 9618
MLT 615 Whan he saugh so benigne a creature 9620
MLT 623 That she had doon so greet a wikkednesse, 9628
MLT 628 This gentil kyng hath caught a greet motyf 9634
MLT 630 Depper in this, a trouthe for to lere. 9636
MLT 645 Have ye nat seyn somtyme a pale face, 9650
MLT 646 Among a prees, of hym that hath be lad 9652
MLT 648 And swich a colour in his face hath had 9654
MLT 662 " Now hastily do fecche a book, " quod he, 9668
MLT 666 A Britoun book, written with Evaungiles, 9672
MLT 670 That doun he fil atones as a stoon, 9676
MLT 673 A voys was herd in general audience, 9678
MLT 693 And thus hath Crist ymaad Custance a queene. 9698
MLT 699 Hir thoughte a despit that he sholde take 9704
MLT 700 So strange a creature unto his make. 9706
MLT 702 Maken so long a tale as of the corn. 9708
MLT 705 Who bloweth in a trumpe or in an horn? 9710
MLT 713 And leye a lite hir hoolynesse aside, 9718
MLT 715 On hire he gat a knave child anon, 9720
MLT 716 And to a bisshop, and his constable eke, 9722
MLT 722 The tyme is come a knave child she beer; 9728
MLT 724 This constable dooth forth come a messageer, 9730
MLT 745 Out of his box, whil he sleep as a swyn; 9750
MLT 751 Of so horrible a feendly creature 9756
MLT 774 Thy mynde is lorn, thou janglest as a jay, 9780
MLT 775 Thy face is turned in a newe array. 9780
MLT 798 Thre dayes and o quarter of a tyde; 9804
MLT 812 So ful of synne is many a creature? 9818
MLT 822 And Custance, with a deedly pale face, 9828
MLT 844 For which thy child was on a croys yrent. 9850
MLT 911 Doun fro the castel comth ther many a wight 9916
MLT 913 But shortly, from the castel, on a nyght, 9918
MLT 915 A theef, that hadde reneyed oure creance, 9920
MLT 949 And somtyme est, ful many a wery day, 9954
MLT 953 Now lat us stynte of Custance but a throwe, 9958
MLT 957 Doon to his doghter by a fals traytour, 9962
MLT 965 Ful many a day; but shortly -- this is th' ende -- 9970
MLT 989 Upon a day fil in swich repentance 9994
MLT 1001 As to doon any kyng a reverence. 10006
MLT 1005 And so bifel that in a day or two 10010
MLT 1020 A mooder he hath, but fader hath he noon 10026
MLT 1021 That I of woot " -- and shortly, in a stounde, 10026
MLT 1024 " So vertuous a lyvere in my lyf 10030
MLT 1027 I dar wel seyn hir hadde levere a knyf 10032
MLT 1028 Thurghout hir brest, than ben a womman wikke; 10034
MLT 1031 As possible is a creature to be. 10036
MLT 1055 And she, for sorwe, as doumb stant as a tree, 10060
MLT 1075 And swich a blisse is ther bitwix hem two 10080
MLT 1120 A thousand foold wel moore than I kan telle. 10126
MLT 1143 Whan passed was a yeer, evene as I gesse, 10148
GP 19 Bifil that in that seson on a day, 10186
GP 24 Wel nyne and twenty in a compaignye 10192
GP 42 And at a knyght than wol I first bigynne. 10210
GP 43 A KNYGHT ther was, and that a worthy man, 10210
GP 43 A KNYGHT ther was, and that a worthy man, 10210
GP 60 At many a noble armee hadde he be. 10228
GP 67 And everemoore he hadde a sovereyn prys. 10234
GP 69 And of his port as meeke as is a mayde. 10236
GP 72 He was a verray, parfit gentil knyght. 10240
GP 75 Of fustian he wered a gypon 10242
GP 79 With hym ther was his sone, a yong SQUIER, 10246
GP 80 A lovyere and a lusty bacheler, 10248
GP 80 A lovyere and a lusty bacheler, 10248
GP 89 Embrouded was he, as it were a meede 10256
GP 98 He sleep namoore than dooth a nyghtyngale. 10266
GP 101 A YEMAN hadde he and servantz namo 10268
GP 104 A sheef of pecok arwes, bright and kene, 10272
GP 108 And in his hand he baar a myghty bowe. 10276
GP 109 A not heed hadde he, with a broun visage. 10276
GP 109 A not heed hadde he, with a broun visage. 10276
GP 111 Upon his arm he baar a gay bracer, 10278
GP 112 And by his syde a swerd and a bokeler, 10280
GP 112 And by his syde a swerd and a bokeler, 10280
GP 113 And on that oother syde a gay daggere 10280
GP 115 A Cristopher on his brest of silver sheene. 10282
GP 117 A forster was he, soothly, as I gesse. 10284
GP 118 Ther was also a Nonne, a PRIORESSE, 10286
GP 118 Ther was also a Nonne, a PRIORESSE, 10286
GP 130 Wel koude she carie a morsel and wel kepe 10298
GP 144 She wolde wepe, if that she saugh a mous 10312
GP 145 Kaught in a trappe, if it were deed or bledde. 10312
GP 149 Or if men smoot it with a yerde smerte; 10316
GP 154 But sikerly she hadde a fair forheed; 10322
GP 155 It was almoost a spanne brood, I trowe; 10322
GP 159 A peire of bedes, gauded al with grene, 10326
GP 160 And theron heng a brooch of gold ful sheene, 10328
GP 161 On which ther was first write a crowned A, 10328
GP 161 On which ther was first write a crowned A, 10328
GP 165 A MONK ther was, a fair for the maistrie, 10332
GP 165 A MONK ther was, a fair for the maistrie, 10332
GP 167 A manly man, to been an abbot able. 10334
GP 168 Ful many a deyntee hors hadde he in stable, 10336
GP 170 Gynglen in a whistlynge wynd als cleere 10338
GP 177 He yaf nat of that text a pulled hen, 10344
GP 179 Ne that a monk, whan he is recchelees, 10346
GP 180 Is likned til a fissh that is waterlees -- 10348
GP 181 This is to seyn, a monk out of his cloystre. 10348
GP 185 Upon a book in cloystre alwey to poure, 10352
GP 189 Therfore he was a prikasour aright: 10356
GP 194 With grys, and that the fyneste of a lond; 10362
GP 196 He hadde of gold ywroght a ful curious pyn; 10364
GP 197 A love-knotte in the gretter ende ther was. 10364
GP 200 He was a lord ful fat and in good poynt; 10368
GP 202 That stemed as a forneys of a leed; 10370
GP 202 That stemed as a forneys of a leed; 10370
GP 204 Now certeinly he was a fair prelaat; 10372
GP 205 He was nat pale as a forpyned goost. 10372
GP 206 A fat swan loved he best of any roost. 10374
GP 207 His palfrey was as broun as is a berye. 10374
GP 208 A FRERE ther was, a wantowne and a merye, 10376
GP 208 A FRERE ther was, a wantowne and a merye, 10376
GP 208 A FRERE ther was, a wantowne and a merye, 10376
GP 209 A lymytour, a ful solempne man. 10376
GP 209 A lymytour, a ful solempne man. 10376
GP 212 He hadde maad ful many a mariage 10380
GP 214 Unto his ordre he was a noble post. 10382
GP 219 As seyde hymself, moore than a curat, 10386
GP 224 Ther as he wiste to have a good pitaunce. 10392
GP 225 For unto a povre ordre for to yive 10392
GP 226 Is signe that a man is wel yshryve; 10394
GP 228 He wiste that a man was repentaunt; 10396
GP 229 For many a man so hard is of his herte, 10396
GP 235 And certeinly he hadde a murye note: 10402
GP 236 Wel koude he synge and pleyen on a rote; 10404
GP 239 Therto he strong was as a champioun. 10406
GP 242 Bet than a lazar or a beggestere, 10410
GP 242 Bet than a lazar or a beggestere, 10410
GP 243 For unto swich a worthy man as he 10410
GP 252a [And yaf a certeyn ferme for the graunt; 10420
GP 253 For thogh a wydwe hadde noght a sho, 10422
GP 253 For thogh a wydwe hadde noght a sho, 10422
GP 255 Yet wolde he have a ferthyng, er he wente. 10424
GP 257 And rage he koude, as it were right a whelp. 10426
GP 259 For ther he was nat lyk a cloysterer 10428
GP 260 With a thredbare cope, as is a povre scoler, 10430
GP 260 With a thredbare cope, as is a povre scoler, 10430
GP 261 But he was lyk a maister or a pope. 10430
GP 261 But he was lyk a maister or a pope. 10430
GP 263 That rounded as a belle out of the presse. 10432
GP 270 A MARCHANT was ther with a forked berd, 10440
GP 270 A MARCHANT was ther with a forked berd, 10440
GP 272 Upon his heed a Flaundryssh bever hat, 10442
GP 283 For sothe he was a worthy man with alle, 10452
GP 285 A CLERK ther was of Oxenford also, 10454
GP 287 As leene was his hors as is a rake, 10456
GP 297 But al be that he was a philosophre, 10466
GP 309 A SERGEANT OF THE LAWE, war and wys, 10478
GP 318 So greet a purchasour was nowher noon: 10488
GP 321 Nowher so bisy a man as he ther nas, 10490
GP 325 Therto he koude endite and make a thyng, 10494
GP 328 He rood but hoomly in a medlee cote, 10498
GP 329 Girt with a ceint of silk, with barres smale; 10498
GP 331 A FRANKELEYN was in his compaignye. 10500
GP 334 Wel loved he by the morwe a sop in wyn; 10504
GP 339 An housholdere, and that a greet, was he; 10508
GP 342 A bettre envyned man was nowher noon. 10512
GP 349 Ful many a fat partrich hadde he in muwe, 10518
GP 350 And many a breem and many a luce in stuwe. 10520
GP 350 And many a breem and many a luce in stuwe. 10520
GP 357 An anlaas and a gipser al of silk 10526
GP 359 A shirreve hadde he been, and a contour. 10528
GP 359 A shirreve hadde he been, and a contour. 10528
GP 360 Was nowher swich a worthy vavasour. 10530
GP 361 AN HABERDASSHERE and a CARPENTER, 10530
GP 362 A WEBBE, a DYERE, and a TAPYCER -- 10532
GP 362 A WEBBE, a DYERE, and a TAPYCER -- 10532
GP 362 A WEBBE, a DYERE, and a TAPYCER -- 10532
GP 364 Of a solempne and a greet fraternitee. 10534
GP 364 Of a solempne and a greet fraternitee. 10534
GP 369 Wel semed ech of hem a fair burgeys 10538
GP 370 To sitten in a yeldehalle on a deys. 10540
GP 370 To sitten in a yeldehalle on a deys. 10540
GP 378 And have a mantel roialliche ybore. 10548
GP 379 A COOK they hadde with hem for the nones 10548
GP 382 Wel koude he knowe a draughte of Londoun ale. 10552
GP 384 Maken mortreux, and wel bake a pye. 10554
GP 386 That on his shyne a mormal hadde he. 10556
GP 388 A SHIPMAN was ther, wonynge fer by weste; 10558
GP 390 He rood upon a rouncy, as he kouthe, 10560
GP 391 In a gowne of faldyng to the knee. 10560
GP 392 A daggere hangynge on a laas hadde he 10562
GP 392 A daggere hangynge on a laas hadde he 10562
GP 395 And certeinly he was a good felawe. 10564
GP 396 Ful many a draughte of wyn had he ydrawe 10566
GP 406 With many a tempest hadde his berd been shake. 10576
GP 411 With us ther was a DOCTOUR OF PHISIK; 10580
GP 415 He kepte his pacient a ful greet deel 10584
GP 422 He was a verray, parfit praktisour: 10592
GP 443 For gold in phisik is a cordial, 10612
GP 445 A good WIF was ther OF biside BATHE, 10614
GP 455 That on a Sonday weren upon hir heed. 10624
GP 459 She was a worthy womman al hir lyve: 10628
GP 464 She hadde passed many a straunge strem; 10634
GP 471 As brood as is a bokeler or a targe; 10640
GP 471 As brood as is a bokeler or a targe; 10640
GP 472 A foot-mantel aboute hir hipes large, 10642
GP 473 And on hir feet a paire of spores sharpe. 10642
GP 477 A good man was ther of religioun, 10646
GP 478 And was a povre PERSOUN OF A TOUN, 10648
GP 478 And was a povre PERSOUN OF A TOUN, 10648
GP 480 He was also a lerned man, a clerk, 10650
GP 480 He was also a lerned man, a clerk, 10650
GP 495 Upon his feet, and in his hand a staf. 10664
GP 501 For if a preest be foul, on whom we truste, 10670
GP 502 No wonder is a lewed man to ruste; 10672
GP 503 And shame it is, if a prest take keep, 10672
GP 504 A shiten shepherde and a clene sheep. 10674
GP 504 A shiten shepherde and a clene sheep. 10674
GP 505 Wel oghte a preest ensample for to yive, 10674
GP 510 To seken hym a chaunterie for soules, 10680
GP 511 Or with a bretherhed to been withholde; 10680
GP 514 He was a shepherde and noght a mercenarie. 10684
GP 514 He was a shepherde and noght a mercenarie. 10684
GP 524 A bettre preest I trowe that nowher noon ys. 10694
GP 526 Ne maked him a spiced conscience, 10696
GP 529 With hym ther was a PLOWMAN, was his brother, 10698
GP 530 That hadde ylad of dong ful many a fother; 10700
GP 531 A trewe swynkere and a good was he, 10700
GP 531 A trewe swynkere and a good was he, 10700
GP 541 In a tabard he rood upon a mere. 10710
GP 541 In a tabard he rood upon a mere. 10710
GP 542 Ther was also a REVE, and a MILLERE, 10712
GP 542 Ther was also a REVE, and a MILLERE, 10712
GP 543 A SOMNOUR, and a PARDONER also, 10712
GP 543 A SOMNOUR, and a PARDONER also, 10712
GP 544 A MAUNCIPLE, and myself -- ther were namo. 10714
GP 545 The MILLERE was a stout carl for the nones; 10714
GP 549 He was short-sholdred, brood, a thikke knarre; 10718
GP 551 Or breke it at a rennyng with his heed. 10720
GP 553 And therto brood, as though it were a spade. 10722
GP 555 A werte, and theron stood a toft of herys, 10724
GP 555 A werte, and theron stood a toft of herys, 10724
GP 556 Reed as the brustles of a sowes erys; 10726
GP 558 A swerd and a bokeler bar he by his syde. 10728
GP 558 A swerd and a bokeler bar he by his syde. 10728
GP 559 His mouth as greet was as a greet forneys. 10728
GP 560 He was a janglere and a goliardeys, 10730
GP 560 He was a janglere and a goliardeys, 10730
GP 563 And yet he hadde a thombe of gold, pardee. 10732
GP 564 A whit cote and a blew hood wered he. 10734
GP 564 A whit cote and a blew hood wered he. 10734
GP 565 A baggepipe wel koude he blowe and sowne, 10734
GP 567 A gentil MAUNCIPLE was ther of a temple, 10736
GP 567 A gentil MAUNCIPLE was ther of a temple, 10736
GP 573 Now is nat that of God a ful fair grace 10742
GP 574 That swich a lewed mannes wit shal pace 10744
GP 578 Of which ther were a duszeyne in that hous 10748
GP 584 And able for to helpen al a shire 10754
GP 587 The REVE was a sclendre colerik man. 10756
GP 590 His top was dokked lyk a preest biforn. 10760
GP 592 Ylyk a staf; ther was no calf ysene. 10762
GP 593 Wel koude he kepe a gerner and a bynne; 10762
GP 593 Wel koude he kepe a gerner and a bynne; 10762
GP 612 And have a thank, and yet a cote and hood. 10782
GP 612 And have a thank, and yet a cote and hood. 10782
GP 613 In youthe he hadde lerned a good myster: 10782
GP 614 He was a wel good wrighte, a carpenter. 10784
GP 614 He was a wel good wrighte, a carpenter. 10784
GP 615 This Reve sat upon a ful good stot 10784
GP 617 A long surcote of pers upon he hade, 10786
GP 618 And by his syde he baar a rusty blade. 10788
GP 620 Biside a toun men clepen Baldeswelle. 10790
GP 621 Tukked he was as is a frere aboute, 10790
GP 623 A SOMONOUR was ther with us in that place, 10792
GP 624 That hadde a fyr-reed cherubynnes face, 10794
GP 626 As hoot he was and lecherous as a sparwe, 10796
GP 639 A fewe termes hadde he, two or thre, 10808
GP 642 And eek ye knowen wel how that a jay 10812
GP 647 He was a gentil harlot and a kynde; 10816
GP 647 He was a gentil harlot and a kynde; 10816
GP 648 A bettre felawe sholde men noght fynde. 10818
GP 649 He wolde suffre for a quart of wyn 10818
GP 650 A good felawe to have his concubyn 10820
GP 651 A twelf month, and excuse hym atte fulle; 10820
GP 652 Ful prively a fynch eek koude he pulle. 10822
GP 653 And if he foond owher a good felawe, 10822
GP 656 But if a mannes soule were in his purs; 10826
GP 662 And also war hym of a Significavit. 10832
GP 666 A gerland hadde he set upon his heed, 10836
GP 668 A bokeleer hadde he maad hym of a cake. 10838
GP 668 A bokeleer hadde he maad hym of a cake. 10838
GP 669 With hym ther rood a gentil PARDONER 10838
GP 673 This Somonour bar to hym a stif burdoun; 10842
GP 674 Was nevere trompe of half so greet a soun. 10844
GP 676 But smothe it heeng as dooth a strike of flex; 10846
GP 685 A vernycle hadde he sowed upon his cappe. 10854
GP 688 A voys he hadde as smal as hath a goot. 10858
GP 688 A voys he hadde as smal as hath a goot. 10858
GP 691 I trowe he were a geldyng or a mare. 10860
GP 691 I trowe he were a geldyng or a mare. 10860
GP 694 For in his male he hadde a pilwe-beer, 10864
GP 696 He seyde he hadde a gobet of the seyl 10866
GP 699 He hadde a croys of latoun ful of stones, 10868
GP 700 And in a glas he hadde pigges bones. 10870
GP 702 A povre person dwellynge upon lond, 10872
GP 703 Upon a day he gat hym moore moneye 10872
GP 708 He was in chirche a noble ecclesiaste. 10878
GP 709 Wel koude he rede a lessoun or a storie, 10878
GP 709 Wel koude he rede a lessoun or a storie, 10878
GP 715 Now have I toold you soothly, in a clause, 10884
GP 731 Whoso shal telle a tale after a man, 10900
GP 731 Whoso shal telle a tale after a man, 10900
GP 733 Everich a word, if it be in his charge, 10902
GP 751 A semely man OURE HOOSTE was withalle 10920
GP 752 For to been a marchal in an halle. 10922
GP 753 A large man he was with eyen stepe -- 10922
GP 754 A fairer burgeys was ther noon in Chepe -- 10924
GP 757 Eek therto he was right a myrie man; 10926
GP 764 I saugh nat this yeer so myrie a compaignye 10934
GP 767 And of a myrthe I am right now bythoght, 10936
GP 774 To ride by the weye doumb as a stoon; 10944
GP 799 Shal have a soper at oure aller cost 10968
GP 815 And sette a soper at a certeyn pris, 10984
GP 815 And sette a soper at a certeyn pris, 10984
GP 824 And gadrede us togidre alle in a flok, 10994
GP 825 And forth we riden a litel moore than paas 10994
GP 854 What, welcome be the cut, a Goddes name! 11024
GP 857 And he bigan with right a myrie cheere 11026
KnT 860 Ther was a duc that highte Theseus; 11030
KnT 862 And in his tyme swich a conquerour 11032
KnT 864 Ful many a riche contree hadde he wonne; 11034
KnT 886 I have, God woot, a large feeld to ere, 11056
KnT 898 A compaignye of ladyes, tweye and tweye, 11068
KnT 900 But swich a cry and swich a wo they make 11070
KnT 900 But swich a cry and swich a wo they make 11070
KnT 913 Whan she hadde swowned with a deedly cheere, 11082
KnT 916 Victorie, and as a conqueror to lyven, 11086
KnT 923 That she ne hath been a duchesse or a queene. 11092
KnT 923 That she ne hath been a duchesse or a queene. 11092
KnT 969 Ne take his ese fully half a day, 11138
KnT 984 Faire in a feeld, ther as he thoughte to fighte. 11154
KnT 987 He faught, and slough hym manly as a knyght 11156
KnT 1010 Thurgh-girt with many a grevous blody wounde, 11180
KnT 1027 With laurer crowned as a conquerour; 11196
KnT 1030 And in a tour, in angwissh and in wo, 11200
KnT 1034 Till it fil ones, in a morwe of May, 11204
KnT 1049 Hir yelow heer was broyded in a tresse 11218
KnT 1050 Bihynde hir bak, a yerde long, I gesse. 11220
KnT 1054 To make a subtil gerland for hire hede; 11224
KnT 1065 Was risen and romed in a chambre an heigh, 11234
KnT 1075 That thurgh a wyndow, thikke of many a barre 11244
KnT 1075 That thurgh a wyndow, thikke of many a barre 11244
KnT 1078 And therwithal he bleynte and cride, " A! " 11248
KnT 1094 Thow hast a veyn ymaginacioun. 11264
KnT 1117 And with a sigh he seyde pitously, 11286
KnT 1149 For which thou art ybounden as a knyght 11318
KnT 1157 Wheither she be a womman or goddesse! 11326
KnT 1159 And myn is love as to a creature; 11328
KnT 1164 That `who shal yeve a lovere any lawe?' 11334
KnT 1165 Love is a gretter lawe, by my pan, 11334
KnT 1169 A man moot nedes love, maugree his heed; 11338
KnT 1179 Ther cam a kyte, whil that they were so wrothe, 11348
KnT 1189 But to th' effect. It happed on a day, 11358
KnT 1191 A worthy duc that highte Perotheus, 11360
KnT 1208 In swich a gyse as I you tellen shal. 11378
KnT 1215 That with a swerd he sholde lese his heed. 11384
KnT 1219 How greet a sorwe suffreth now Arcite! 11388
KnT 1241 And art a knyght, a worthy and an able, 11410
KnT 1241 And art a knyght, a worthy and an able, 11410
KnT 1253 That yeveth hem ful ofte in many a gyse 11422
KnT 1261 We faren as he that dronke is as a mous. 11430
KnT 1262 A dronke man woot wel he hath an hous, 11432
KnT 1264 And to a dronke man the wey is slider. 11434
KnT 1269 That wende and hadde a greet opinioun 11438
KnT 1287 And make a werre so sharp on this citee 11456
KnT 1293 And art a lord, greet is thyn avauntage 11462
KnT 1294 Moore than is myn, that sterve here in a cage. 11464
KnT 1318 Ther as a beest may al his lust fulfille. 11488
KnT 1319 And whan a beest is deed he hath no peyne; 11488
KnT 1325 Allas, I se a serpent or a theef, 11494
KnT 1325 Allas, I se a serpent or a theef, 11494
KnT 1326 That many a trewe man hath doon mescheef, 11496
KnT 1334 Now wol I stynte of Palamon a lite, 11504
KnT 1356 Ful ofte a day he swelte and seyde " Allas! " 11526
KnT 1362 That lene he wex and drye as is a shaft; 11532
KnT 1381 Whan he endured hadde a yeer or two 11550
KnT 1384 Upon a nyght in sleep as he hym leyde, 11554
KnT 1399 And with that word he caughte a greet mirour, 11568
KnT 1409 And cladde hym as a povre laborer, 11578
KnT 1410 And al allone, save oonly a squier 11580
KnT 1414 And to the court he wente upon a day, 11584
KnT 1418 He fil in office with a chamberleyn 11588
KnT 1426 A yeer or two he was in this servyse, 11596
KnT 1429 But half so wel biloved a man as he 11598
KnT 1433 They seyden that it were a charitee 11602
KnT 1437 And thus withinne a while his name is spronge, 11606
KnT 1440 That of his chambre he made hym a squier, 11610
KnT 1450 And speke I wole of Palamon a lite. 11620
KnT 1457 And eek therto he is a prisoner 11626
KnT 1458 Perpetuelly, noght oonly for a yer. 11628
KnT 1466 As, whan a thyng is shapen, it shal be -- 11636
KnT 1468 By helpyng of a freend, brak his prisoun 11638
KnT 1471 Of a clarree maad of a certeyn wyn, 11640
KnT 1471 Of a clarree maad of a certeyn wyn, 11640
KnT 1478 And til a grove faste ther bisyde 11648
KnT 1502 He on a courser, startlynge as the fir, 11672
KnT 1504 Out of the court, were it a myle or tweye. 11674
KnT 1507 To maken hym a gerland of the greves, 11676
KnT 1513 And from his courser, with a lusty herte, 11682
KnT 1515 And in a path he rometh up and doun, 11684
KnT 1517 Was in a bussh, that no man myghte hym se, 11686
KnT 1523 It is ful fair a man to bere hym evene, 11692
KnT 1530 Into a studie he fil sodeynly, 11700
KnT 1533 Now up, now doun, as boket in a welle. 11702
KnT 1558 Now highte I Philostrate, noght worth a myte. 11728
KnT 1570 Ne sette I nat the montance of a tare, 11740
KnT 1572 And with that word he fil doun in a traunce 11742
KnT 1573 A longe tyme, and after he up sterte. 11742
KnT 1575 He felte a coold swerd sodeynliche glyde, 11744
KnT 1608 But for as muche thou art a worthy knyght 11778
KnT 1612 That heere I wol be founden as a knyght, 11782
KnT 1639 That stondeth at the gappe with a spere, 11808
KnT 1656 In his fightyng were a wood leon, 11826
KnT 1657 And as a crueel tigre was Arcite; 11826
KnT 1667 The contrarie of a thyng by ye or nay, 11836
KnT 1668 Yet somtyme it shal fallen on a day 11838
KnT 1669 That falleth nat eft withinne a thousand yeer. 11838
KnT 1693 And over a brook, and so forth on his weye. 11862
KnT 1694 This duc wol han a cours at hym or tweye 11864
KnT 1705 And at a stert he was bitwix hem two, 11874
KnT 1706 And pulled out a swerd and cride, " Hoo! 11876
KnT 1713 As it were in a lystes roially. " 11882
KnT 1719 And as thou art a rightful lord and juge, 11888
KnT 1729 Thus hath he japed thee ful many a yer, 11898
KnT 1743 And seyde, " This is a short conclusioun. 11912
KnT 1752 That evere swich a chaunce sholde falle, 11922
KnT 1763 He hath considered shortly, in a clause, 11932
KnT 1774 Upon a lord that wol have no mercy, 11944
KnT 1775 But been a leon, bothe in word and dede, 11944
KnT 1777 As wel as to a proud despitous man 11946
KnT 1785 " The god of love, a benedicite! 11954
KnT 1786 How myghty and how greet a lord is he! 11956
KnT 1788 He may be cleped a god for his myracles, 11958
KnT 1799 Who may been a fool but if he love? 11968
KnT 1810 By God, than woot a cokkow or an hare! 11980
KnT 1812 A man moot ben a fool, or yong or oold -- 11982
KnT 1812 A man moot ben a fool, or yong or oold -- 11982
KnT 1814 For in my tyme a servant was I oon. 11984
KnT 1816 And woot hou soore it kan a man distreyne, 11986
KnT 1830 Though that she were a queene or a princesse, 12000
KnT 1830 Though that she were a queene or a princesse, 12000
KnT 1855 Upon my trouthe, and as I am a knyght, 12024
KnT 1861 To whom that Fortune yeveth so fair a grace. 12030
KnT 1874 Whan Theseus hath doon so fair a grace? 12044
KnT 1885 That swich a noble theatre as it was 12054
KnT 1887 The circuit a myle was aboute, 12056
KnT 1891 That whan a man was set on o degree, 12060
KnT 1893 Estward ther stood a gate of marbul whit, 12062
KnT 1895 And shortly to concluden, swich a place 12064
KnT 1908 That coste largely of gold a fother. 12078
KnT 1909 And northward, in a touret on the wal, 12078
KnT 1929 That wered of yelewe gooldes a gerland, 12098
KnT 1930 And a cokkow sittynge on hir hand; 12100
KnT 1954 And though I koude rekene a thousand mo. 12124
KnT 1959 A citole in hir right hand hadde she, 12128
KnT 1961 A rose gerland, fressh and wel smellynge; 12130
KnT 1966 A bowe he bar and arwes brighte and kene. 12136
KnT 1975 First on the wal was peynted a forest, 12144
KnT 1979 In which ther ran a rumbel in a swough, 12148
KnT 1979 In which ther ran a rumbel in a swough, 12148
KnT 1980 As though a storm sholde bresten every bough. 12150
KnT 1981 And dounward from an hille, under a bente, 12150
KnT 1985 And therout came a rage and swich a veze 12154
KnT 1985 And therout came a rage and swich a veze 12154
KnT 2014 A thousand slayn, and nat of qualm ystorve; 12184
KnT 2027 And al above, depeynted in a tour, 12196
KnT 2030 Hangynge by a soutil twynes threed. 12200
KnT 2041 The statue of Mars upon a carte stood 12210
KnT 2047 A wolf ther stood biforn hym at his feet 12216
KnT 2048 With eyen rede, and of a man he eet; 12218
KnT 2058 Was turned from a womman til a bere, 12228
KnT 2058 Was turned from a womman til a bere, 12228
KnT 2061 Hir sone is eek a sterre, as men may see. 12230
KnT 2062 Ther saugh I Dane, yturned til a tree -- 12232
KnT 2069 Yet peynted was a litel forther moor 12238
KnT 2077 And undernethe hir feet she hadde a moone -- 12246
KnT 2080 With bowe in honde and arwes in a cas. 12250
KnT 2083 A womman travaillynge was hire biforn; 12252
KnT 2088 With many a floryn he the hewes boghte. 12258
KnT 2093 But stynte I wole of Theseus a lite, 12262
KnT 2101 And sikerly ther trowed many a man 12270
KnT 2105 Nas of so fewe so noble a compaignye. 12274
KnT 2107 And wolde, his thankes, han a passant name, 12276
KnT 2110 For if ther fille tomorwe swich a cas, 12280
KnT 2115 To fighte for a lady, benedicitee! 12284
KnT 2116 It were a lusty sighte for to see. 12286
KnT 2120 And in a brestplate and a light gypoun; 12290
KnT 2120 And in a brestplate and a light gypoun; 12290
KnT 2121 And som wol have a paire plates large; 12290
KnT 2122 And som wol have a Pruce sheeld or a targe; 12292
KnT 2122 And som wol have a Pruce sheeld or a targe; 12292
KnT 2124 And have an ax, and som a mace of steel -- 12294
KnT 2133 And lik a grifphon looked he aboute, 12302
KnT 2138 Ful hye upon a chaar of gold stood he, 12308
KnT 2142 He hadde a beres skyn, col-blak for old. 12312
KnT 2145 A wrethe of gold, arm-greet, of huge wighte, 12314
KnT 2157 Upon a steede bay trapped in steel, 12326
KnT 2163 A mantelet upon his shulder hangynge, 12332
KnT 2169 A fewe frakenes in his face yspreynd, 12338
KnT 2171 And as a leon he his lookyng caste. 12340
KnT 2174 His voys was as a trompe thonderynge. 12344
KnT 2176 A gerland, fressh and lusty for to sene. 12346
KnT 2186 Ful many a tame leon and leopart. 12356
KnT 2217 And in hir houre he walketh forth a pas 12386
KnT 2255 Thanne preye I thee, tomorwe with a spere 12424
KnT 2266 And made a signe, wherby that he took 12436
KnT 2268 For thogh the signe shewed a delay, 12438
KnT 2283 Hir body wessh with water of a welle. 12452
KnT 2286 And yet it were a game to heeren al. 12456
KnT 2288 But it is good a man been at his large. 12458
KnT 2290 A coroune of a grene ook cerial 12460
KnT 2290 A coroune of a grene ook cerial 12460
KnT 2301 Ful many a yeer, and woost what I desire, 12470
KnT 2305 Desire to ben a mayden al my lyf, 12474
KnT 2308 A mayde, and love huntynge and venerye, 12478
KnT 2310 And noght to ben a wyf and be with childe. 12480
KnT 2330 And whil I lyve, a mayde I wol thee serve. " 12500
KnT 2333 But sodeynly she saugh a sighte queynte, 12502
KnT 2337 And as it queynte it made a whistelynge, 12506
KnT 2360 And forth she wente and made a vanysshynge; 12530
KnT 2388 Although thee ones on a tyme mysfille, 12558
KnT 2427 A sweete smel the ground anon up yaf, 12596
KnT 2432 And with that soun he herde a murmurynge 12602
KnT 2494 And to the paleys rood ther many a route 12664
KnT 2520 " He hath a sparth of twenty pound of wighte. " 12690
KnT 2528 Duc Theseus was at a wyndow set, 12698
KnT 2529 Arrayed right as he were a god in trone. 12698
KnT 2533 An heraud on a scaffold made an " Oo! " 12702
KnT 2549 But o cours with a sharpe ygrounde spere; 12718
KnT 2563 " God save swich a lord, that is so good 12732
KnT 2569 Ful lik a lord this noble duc gan ryde, 12738
KnT 2614 He rolleth under foot as dooth a bal; 12784
KnT 2623 Ful ofte a day han thise Thebanes two 12792
KnT 2646 Is born out of his sadel a swerdes lengthe, 12816
KnT 2660 Anon ther is a noyse of peple bigonne 12830
KnT 2674 But herkneth me, and stynteth noyse a lite, 12844
KnT 2675 Which a myracle ther bifel anon. 12844
KnT 2677 And on a courser, for to shewe his face, 12846
KnT 2680 And she agayn hym caste a freendlich ye 12850
KnT 2684 Out of the ground a furie infernal sterte, 12854
KnT 2697 And in a bed ybrought ful faire and blyve, 12866
KnT 2710 That with a spere was thirled his brest boon. 12880
KnT 2720 But as a justes or a tourneiynge; 12890
KnT 2720 But as a justes or a tourneiynge; 12890
KnT 2736 And fully heeld a feeste dayes three, 12906
KnT 2738 Out of his toun a journee largely. 12908
KnT 2784 Had strif and rancour many a day agon 12954
KnT 2787 To speken of a servaunt proprely, 12956
KnT 2796 And if that evere ye shul ben a wyf, 12966
KnT 2847 This world nys but a thurghfare ful of wo, 13016
KnT 2863 He wolde make a fyr in which the office 13032
KnT 2866 The okes olde, and leye hem on a rewe 13036
KnT 2871 After a beere, and it al overspradde 13040
KnT 2875 Eek on his heed a coroune of laurer grene, 13044
KnT 2876 And in his hond a swerd ful bright and kene. 13046
KnT 2897 And riden forth a paas with sorweful cheere 13066
KnT 2918 Of stree first ther was leyd ful many a lode. 13088
KnT 2934 And thanne with drye stikkes cloven a thre, 13104
KnT 2937 And gerlandes, hangynge with ful many a flour; 13106
KnT 2953 Upon the left hand, with a loud shoutynge, 13122
KnT 2970 Thanne semed me ther was a parlement 13140
KnT 2982 And Theseus abiden hadde a space 13152
KnT 2985 And with a sad visage he siked stille, 13154
KnT 3005 Wel may men knowe, but it be a fool, 13174
KnT 3008 Of no partie or cantel of a thyng, 13178
KnT 3009 But of a thyng that parfit is and stable, 13178
KnT 3017 " Loo the ook, that hath so long a norisshynge 13186
KnT 3019 And hath so long a lif, as we may see, 13188
KnT 3030 He moot be deed, the kyng as shal a page; 13200
KnT 3047 And certeinly a man hath moost honour 13216
KnT 3055 Thanne is it best, as for a worthy fame, 13224
KnT 3064 Kan he hem thank? Nay, God woot, never a deel, 13234
KnT 3084 He is a kynges brother sone, pardee; 13254
KnT 3085 And though he were a povre bacheler, 13254
KnT 3086 Syn he hath served yow so many a yeer, 13256
MilT 3111 That he ne seyde it was a noble storie 13280
MilT 3126 I kan a noble tale for the nones, 13296
MilT 3134 Oure Hoost answerde, " Tel on, a devel wey! 13304
MilT 3135 Thou art a fool; thy wit is overcome. " 13304
MilT 3137 But first I make a protestacioun 13306
MilT 3141 For I wol telle a legende and a lyf 13310
MilT 3141 For I wol telle a legende and a lyf 13310
MilT 3142 Bothe of a carpenter and of his wyf, 13312
MilT 3143 How that a clerk hath set the wrightes cappe. " 13312
MilT 3146 It is a synne and eek a greet folye 13316
MilT 3146 It is a synne and eek a greet folye 13316
MilT 3155 And evere a thousand goode ayeyns oon badde. 13324
MilT 3158 I have a wyf, pardee, as wel as thow; 13328
MilT 3182 The Millere is a cherl; ye knowe wel this. 13352
MilT 3188 A riche gnof, that gestes heeld to bord, 13358
MilT 3189 And of his craft he was a carpenter. 13358
MilT 3190 With hym ther was dwellynge a poure scoler, 13360
MilT 3193 And koude a certeyn of conclusiouns, 13362
MilT 3202 And lyk a mayden meke for to see. 13372
MilT 3203 A chambre hadde he in that hostelrye 13372
MilT 3212 His presse ycovered with a faldyng reed; 13382
MilT 3213 And al above ther lay a gay sautrie, 13382
MilT 3221 This carpenter hadde wedded newe a wyf, 13390
MilT 3226 And demed hymself been lik a cokewold. 13396
MilT 3235 A ceynt she werede, barred al of silk, 13404
MilT 3236 A barmclooth as whit as morne milk 13406
MilT 3237 Upon hir lendes, ful of many a goore. 13406
MilT 3244 And sikerly she hadde a likerous ye; 13414
MilT 3249 And softer than the wolle is of a wether. 13418
MilT 3250 And by hir girdel heeng a purs of lether, 13420
MilT 3254 So gay a popelote or swich a wenche. 13424
MilT 3254 So gay a popelote or swich a wenche. 13424
MilT 3258 As any swalwe sittynge on a berne. 13428
MilT 3263 Wynsynge she was, as is a joly colt, 13432
MilT 3264 Long as a mast, and upright as a bolt. 13434
MilT 3264 Long as a mast, and upright as a bolt. 13434
MilT 3265 A brooch she baar upon hir lowe coler, 13434
MilT 3266 As brood as is the boos of a bokeler. 13436
MilT 3268 She was a prymerole, a piggesnye, 13438
MilT 3268 She was a prymerole, a piggesnye, 13438
MilT 3272 That on a day this hende Nicholas 13442
MilT 3282 And she sproong as a colt dooth in the trave, 13452
MilT 3299 " A clerk hadde litherly biset his whyle, 13468
MilT 3300 But if he koude a carpenter bigyle. " 13470
MilT 3302 To wayte a tyme, as I have told biforn. 13472
MilT 3312 Now was ther of that chirche a parissh clerk, 13482
MilT 3315 And strouted as a fanne large and brode; 13484
MilT 3321 Al in a kirtel of a lyght waget; 13490
MilT 3321 Al in a kirtel of a lyght waget; 13490
MilT 3323 And therupon he hadde a gay surplys 13492
MilT 3325 A myrie child he was, so God me save. 13494
MilT 3327 And maken a chartre of lond or acquitaunce. 13496
MilT 3331 And pleyen songes on a smal rubible; 13500
MilT 3332 Therto he song som tyme a loud quynyble; 13502
MilT 3333 And as wel koude he pleye on a giterne. 13502
MilT 3340 Gooth with a sencer on the haliday, 13510
MilT 3342 And many a lovely look on hem he caste, 13512
MilT 3344 To looke on hire hym thoughte a myrie lyf, 13514
MilT 3346 I dar wel seyn, if she hadde been a mous, 13516
MilT 3347 And he a cat, he wolde hire hente anon. 13516
MilT 3349 Hath in his herte swich a love-longynge 13518
MilT 3357 A litel after cokkes hadde ycrowe, 13526
MilT 3358 And dressed hym up by a shot-wyndowe 13528
MilT 3377 He syngeth, brokkynge as a nyghtyngale; 13546
MilT 3384 He pleyeth Herodes upon a scaffold hye. 13554
MilT 3388 He ne hadde for his labour but a scorn. 13558
MilT 3390 And al his ernest turneth til a jape. 13560
MilT 3399 And so bifel it on a Saterday, 13568
MilT 3403 That Nicholas shal shapen hym a wyle 13572
MilT 3411 Bothe mete and drynke for a day or tweye, 13580
MilT 3429 I saugh today a cors yborn to chirche 13598
MilT 3432 " Clepe at his dore, or knokke with a stoon. 13602
MilT 3439 But al for noght; he herde nat a word. 13608
MilT 3440 An hole he foond, ful lowe upon a bord, 13610
MilT 3443 And at the laste he hadde of hym a sight. 13612
MilT 3450 A man woot litel what hym shal bityde. 13620
MilT 3455 Ye, blessed be alwey a lewed man 13624
MilT 3460 Til he was in a marle-pit yfalle; 13630
MilT 3465 Get me a staf, that I may underspore, 13634
MilT 3469 His knave was a strong carl for the nones, 13638
MilT 3497 And broghte of myghty ale a large quart; 13666
MilT 3516 That now a Monday next, at quarter nyght, 13686
MilT 3517 Shal falle a reyn, and that so wilde and wood 13686
MilT 3543 That she hadde had a ship hirself allone. 13712
MilT 3548 A knedyng trogh, or ellis a kymelyn, 13718
MilT 3548 A knedyng trogh, or ellis a kymelyn, 13718
MilT 3550 In which we mowe swymme as in a barge, 13720
MilT 3552 But for a day -- fy on the remenant! 13722
MilT 3560 To han as greet a grace as Noe hadde. 13730
MilT 3586 That noon of us ne speke nat a word, 13756
MilT 3611 Lo, which a greet thyng is affeccioun! 13780
MilT 3619 He siketh with ful many a sory swogh; 13788
MilT 3620 He gooth and geteth hym a knedyng trogh, 13790
MilT 3621 And after that a tubbe and a kymelyn, 13790
MilT 3621 And after that a tubbe and a kymelyn, 13790
MilT 3628 With breed, and chese, and good ale in a jubbe, 13798
MilT 3629 Suffisynge right ynogh as for a day. 13798
MilT 3637 They seten stille wel a furlong way. 13806
MilT 3661 And axed upon cas a cloisterer 13830
MilT 3668 And dwellen at the grange a day or two; 13838
MilT 3683 That is a signe of kissyng atte leeste. 13852
MilT 3684 Al nyght me mette eek I was at a feeste. 13854
MilT 3692 Under his tonge a trewe-love he beer, 13862
MilT 3697 And softe he cougheth with a semy soun: 13866
MilT 3704 I moorne as dooth a lamb after the tete. 13874
MilT 3706 That lik a turtel trewe is my moornynge. 13876
MilT 3707 I may nat ete na moore than a mayde. " 13876
MilT 3712 Go forth thy wey, or I wol caste a ston, 13882
MilT 3713 And lat me slepe, a twenty devel wey! " 13882
MilT 3724 And seyde, " I am a lord at alle degrees; 13894
MilT 3737 For wel he wiste a womman hath no berd. 13906
MilT 3738 He felte a thyng al rough and long yherd, 13908
MilT 3741 And Absolon gooth forth a sory pas. 13910
MilT 3742 " A berd! A berd! " quod hende Nicholas, 13912
MilT 3742 " A berd! A berd! " quod hende Nicholas, 13912
MilT 3756 Of paramours he sette nat a kers, 13926
MilT 3759 And weep as dooth a child that is ybete. 13928
MilT 3760 A softe paas he wente over the strete 13930
MilT 3761 Until a smyth men cleped daun Gerveys, 13930
MilT 3772 This Absolon ne roghte nat a bene 13942
MilT 3780 Or in a poke nobles alle untold, 13950
MilT 3791 That knokketh so? I warante it a theef. " 13960
MilT 3794 Of gold, " quod he, " I have thee broght a ryng. 13964
MilT 3806 This Nicholas anon leet fle a fart 13976
MilT 3807 As greet as it had been a thonder-dent, 13976
MilT 3842 And turned al his harm unto a jape. 14012
RvT 3862 A litel ire is in his herte ylaft; 14032
RvT 3863 He gan to grucche, and blamed it a lite. 14032
RvT 3865 With bleryng of a proud milleres ye, 14034
RvT 3877 For in oure wyl ther stiketh evere a nayl, 14046
RvT 3878 To have an hoor heed and a grene tayl, 14048
RvT 3879 As hath a leek; for thogh oure myght be goon, 14048
RvT 3888 And yet ik have alwey a coltes tooth, 14058
RvT 3889 As many a yeer as it is passed henne 14058
RvT 3900 He gan to speke as lordly as a kyng. 14070
RvT 3903 The devel made a reve for to preche, 14072
RvT 3904 Or of a soutere a shipman or a leche. 14074
RvT 3904 Or of a soutere a shipman or a leche. 14074
RvT 3904 Or of a soutere a shipman or a leche. 14074
RvT 3907 Lo Grenewych, ther many a shrewe is inne! 14076
RvT 3914 How that bigyled was a carpenteer, 14084
RvT 3919 He kan wel in myn eye seen a stalke, 14088
RvT 3920 But in his owene he kan nat seen a balke. " 14090
MLT 25 Wel kan Senec and many a philosophre 14114
MLT 34 Telle us a tale anon, as forward is. 14124
MLT 43 For swich lawe as a man yeveth another wight, 14132
MLT 50 Of olde tyme, as knoweth many a man; 14140
MLT 84 That is so horrible a tale for to rede, 14174
MLT 94 But nathelees, I recche noght a bene 14184
MLT 97 And with that word he, with a sobre cheere, 14186
MLT 132 Nere that a marchant, goon is many a yeere, 14222
MLT 132 Nere that a marchant, goon is many a yeere, 14222
MLT 133 Me taughte a tale, which that ye shal heere. 14222
MLT 134 In Surrye whilom dwelte a compaignye 14224
MLT 149 A certein tyme, as fil to hire plesance. 14238
MLT 157 A doghter hath that, syn the world bigan, 14246
MLT 197 In sterres, many a wynter therbiforn, 14286
MLT 208 To han Custance withinne a litel space, 14298
MLT 213 Many a subtil resoun forth they leyden; 14302
MLT 251 May no man tellen in a litel clause 14340
MLT 252 As was arrayed for so heigh a cause. 14342
MLT 314 Noght whan a roote is of a burthe yknowe? 14404
MLT 314 Noght whan a roote is of a burthe yknowe? 14404
MLT 352 Coold water shal nat greve us but a lite! -- 14442
MLT 353 And I shal swich a feeste and revel make 14442
MLT 357 Thogh she a font-ful water with hire lede. " 14446
MLT 375 She rydeth to the Sowdan on a day, 14464
MLT 387 In Surrye, with a greet solempne route, 14476
MLT 396 Receyveth hire with also glad a cheere 14486
MLT 399 A softe paas solempnely they ryde. 14488
MLT 401 Of which that Lucan maketh swich a boost, 14490
MLT 439 And in a ship al steerelees, God woot, 14528
MLT 442 A certein tresor that she thider ladde, 14532
MLT 459 The white Lamb, that hurt was with a spere, 14548
MLT 466 On many a sory meel now may she bayte; 14556
MLT 510 That thennes wolde it noght of al a tyde; 14600
MLT 519 A maner Latyn corrupt was hir speche, 14608
MLT 537 In orisons, with many a bitter teere, 14626
MLT 557 Toward the see a furlong wey or two, 14646
MLT 577 But kepte it strongly many a wyntres space 14666
MLT 585 And made a yong knyght that dwelte in that toun 14674
MLT 594 And pryvely upon a nyght he crepte 14684
MLT 612 That in a ship was founden this Custance, 14702
MLT 615 Whan he saugh so benigne a creature 14704
MLT 623 That she had doon so greet a wikkednesse, 14712
MLT 628 This gentil kyng hath caught a greet motyf 14718
MLT 630 Depper in this, a trouthe for to lere. 14720
MLT 645 Have ye nat seyn somtyme a pale face, 14734
MLT 646 Among a prees, of hym that hath be lad 14736
MLT 648 And swich a colour in his face hath had 14738
MLT 662 " Now hastily do fecche a book, " quod he, 14752
MLT 666 A Britoun book, written with Evaungiles, 14756
MLT 670 That doun he fil atones as a stoon, 14760
MLT 673 A voys was herd in general audience, 14762
MLT 693 And thus hath Crist ymaad Custance a queene. 14782
MLT 699 Hir thoughte a despit that he sholde take 14788
MLT 700 So strange a creature unto his make. 14790
MLT 702 Maken so long a tale as of the corn. 14792
MLT 705 Who bloweth in a trumpe or in an horn? 14794
MLT 713 And leye a lite hir hoolynesse aside, 14802
MLT 715 On hire he gat a knave child anon, 14804
MLT 716 And to a bisshop, and his constable eke, 14806
MLT 722 The tyme is come a knave child she beer; 14812
MLT 724 This constable dooth forth come a messageer, 14814
MLT 745 Out of his box, whil he sleep as a swyn; 14834
MLT 751 Of so horrible a feendly creature 14840
MLT 774 Thy mynde is lorn, thou janglest as a jay, 14864
MLT 775 Thy face is turned in a newe array. 14864
MLT 798 Thre dayes and o quarter of a tyde; 14888
MLT 812 So ful of synne is many a creature? 14902
MLT 822 And Custance, with a deedly pale face, 14912
MLT 844 For which thy child was on a croys yrent. 14934
MLT 911 Doun fro the castel comth ther many a wight 15000
MLT 913 But shortly, from the castel, on a nyght, 15002
MLT 915 A theef, that hadde reneyed oure creance, 15004
MLT 949 And somtyme est, ful many a wery day, 15038
MLT 953 Now lat us stynte of Custance but a throwe, 15042
MLT 957 Doon to his doghter by a fals traytour, 15046
MLT 965 Ful many a day; but shortly -- this is th' ende -- 15054
MLT 989 Upon a day fil in swich repentance 15078
MLT 1001 As to doon any kyng a reverence. 15090
MLT 1005 And so bifel that in a day or two 15094
MLT 1020 A mooder he hath, but fader hath he noon 15110
MLT 1021 That I of woot " -- and shortly, in a stounde, 15110
MLT 1024 " So vertuous a lyvere in my lyf 15114
MLT 1027 I dar wel seyn hir hadde levere a knyf 15116
MLT 1028 Thurghout hir brest, than ben a womman wikke; 15118
MLT 1031 As possible is a creature to be. 15120
MLT 1055 And she, for sorwe, as doumb stant as a tree, 15144
MLT 1075 And swich a blisse is ther bitwix hem two 15164
MLT 1120 A thousand foold wel moore than I kan telle. 15210
MLT 1143 Whan passed was a yeer, evene as I gesse, 15232
MLT 1165 This was a thrifty tale for the nones! 15254
MLT 1167 Telle us a tale, as was thi forward yore. 15256
MLT 1173 I smelle a Lollere in the wynd, " quod he. 15262
MLT 1176 For we schal han a predicacioun; 15266
MLT 1185 My joly body schal a tale telle, 15274
MLT 1186 And I schal clynken you so mery a belle, 15276
WBT 14 Herkne eek, lo, which a sharp word for the nones, 15294
WBT 15 Biside a welle, Jhesus, God and man, 15294
WBT 42 The firste nyght had many a myrie fit 15322
WBT 50 To wedde, a Goddes half, where it liketh me. 15336
WBT 66 Men may conseille a womman to been oon, 15352
WBT 74 A thyng of which his maister yaf noon heeste. 15360
WBT 79 I woot wel that th' apostel was a mayde; 15364
WBT 83 And for to been a wyf he yaf me leve 15368
WBT 99 For wel ye knowe, a lord in his houshold, 15384
WBT 103 And everich hath of God a propre yifte -- 15388
WBT 117 And of so parfit wys a [wright] ywroght? 15402
WBT 122 Were eek to knowe a femele from a male, 15408
WBT 122 Were eek to knowe a femele from a male, 15408
WBT 133 Thanne were they maad upon a creature 15418
WBT 139 Crist was a mayde and shapen as a man, 15424
WBT 139 Crist was a mayde and shapen as a man, 15424
WBT 140 And many a seint, sith that the world bigan; 15426
WBT 146 Oure Lord Jhesu refresshed many a man. 15432
WBT 165 Ye been a noble prechour in this cas. 15450
WBT 166 I was aboute to wedde a wyf; allas! 15452
WBT 209 A wys womman wol bisye hire evere in oon 15494
WBT 216 That many a nyght they songen `Weilawey!' 15502
WBT 228 Swere and lyen, as a womman kan. 15514
WBT 231 A wys wyf, if that she kan hir good, 15516
WBT 243 And if I have a gossib or a freend, 15528
WBT 243 And if I have a gossib or a freend, 15528
WBT 244 Withouten gilt, thou chidest as a feend, 15530
WBT 246 Thou comest hoom as dronken as a mous, 15532
WBT 248 Thou seist to me it is a greet meschief 15534
WBT 249 To wedde a povre womman, for costage; 15534
WBT 251 Thanne seistow that it is a tormentrie 15536
WBT 256 That is assailled upon ech a syde. 15542
WBT 263 Thou seyst men may nat kepe a castel wal, 15548
WBT 267 For as a spanyel she wol on hym lepe, 15552
WBT 272 A thyng that no man wole, his thankes, helde. 15558
WBT 280 Out of hir owene houses; a, benedicitee! 15566
WBT 284 Wel may that be a proverbe of a shrewe! 15570
WBT 284 Wel may that be a proverbe of a shrewe! 15570
WBT 297 And but thou make a feeste on thilke day 15582
WBT 306 Yet hastow caught a fals suspecioun. 15592
WBT 320 I knowe yow for a trewe wyf, dame Alys. " 15606
WBT 333 He is to greet a nygard that wolde werne 15618
WBT 334 A man to lighte a candle at his lanterne; 15620
WBT 334 A man to lighte a candle at his lanterne; 15620
WBT 347 I wol nat wirche as muchel as a gnat. 15632
WBT 348 Thou seydest this, that I was lyk a cat; 15634
WBT 349 For whoso wolde senge a cattes skyn, 15634
WBT 352 She wol nat dwelle in house half a day, 15638
WBT 370 But if a sely wyf be oon of tho? 15656
WBT 376 Thou seyest, right as wormes shende a tree, 15662
WBT 377 Right so a wyf destroyeth hire housbonde; 15662
WBT 399 Under that colour hadde I many a myrthe. 15684
WBT 417 And make me a feyned appetit; 15702
WBT 425 I ne owe hem nat a word that it nys quit. 15710
WBT 429 For thogh he looked as a wood leon, 15714
WBT 435 And han a sweete spiced conscience, 15720
WBT 439 That it is fair to have a wyf in pees. 15724
WBT 441 And sith a man is moore resonable 15726
WBT 448 I koude walke as fressh as is a rose; 15734
WBT 453 My fourthe housbonde was a revelour -- 15738
WBT 454 This is to seyn, he hadde a paramour -- 15740
WBT 456 Stibourn and strong, and joly as a pye. 15742
WBT 459 Whan I had dronke a draughte of sweete wyn! 15744
WBT 461 That with a staf birafte his wyf hir lyf, 15746
WBT 466 A likerous mouth moste han a likerous tayl. 15752
WBT 466 A likerous mouth moste han a likerous tayl. 15752
WBT 484 I made hym of the same wode a croce; 15770
WBT 516 In this matere a queynte fantasye: 15802
WBT 527 He som tyme was a clerk of Oxenford, 15812
WBT 534 For hadde myn housbonde pissed on a wal, 15820
WBT 535 Or doon a thyng that sholde han cost his lyf, 15820
WBT 542 Had toold to me so greet a pryvetee. 15828
WBT 543 And so bifel that ones in a Lente -- 15828
WBT 561 Upon my peril, frete hem never a deel; 15846
WBT 572 I holde a mouses herte nat worth a leek 15858
WBT 572 I holde a mouses herte nat worth a leek 15858
WBT 586 A ha! By God, I have my tale ageyn. 15872
WBT 591 But for that I was purveyed of a make, 15876
WBT 597 After the beere, me thoughte he hadde a paire 15882
WBT 602 But yet I hadde alwey a coltes tooth. 15888
WBT 605 As help me God, I was a lusty oon, 15890
WBT 618 My chambre of Venus from a good felawe. 15904
WBT 635 For that I rente out of his book a leef, 15920
WBT 637 Stibourn I was as is a leonesse, 15922
WBT 638 And of my tonge a verray jangleresse, 15924
WBT 646 Lookynge out at his dore upon a day. 15932
WBT 648 That, for his wyf was at a someres game 15934
WBT 667 Why that I rente out of his book a leef, 15952
WBT 669 He hadde a book that gladly, nyght and day, 15954
WBT 673 And eek ther was somtyme a clerk at Rome, 15958
WBT 674 A cardinal, that highte Seint Jerome, 15960
WBT 675 That made a book agayn Jovinian; 15960
WBT 712 That I was beten for a book, pardee! 15998
WBT 713 Upon a nyght Jankyn, that was oure sire, 15998
WBT 732 But `Er that thonder stynte, comth a reyn!' 16018
WBT 735 Fy! Spek namoore -- it is a grisly thyng -- 16020
WBT 742 Myn housbonde hadde a legende of his wyf, 16028
WBT 745 Wher that hir housbonde hidde hym in a place, 16030
WBT 754 She yaf hym swich a manere love-drynke 16040
WBT 759 That in his gardyn growed swich a tree 16044
WBT 763 `Yif me a plante of thilke blissed tree, 16048
WBT 776 Be with a leon or a foul dragoun, 16062
WBT 776 Be with a leon or a foul dragoun, 16062
WBT 777 Than with a womman usynge for to chyde. 16062
WBT 785 Is lyk a gold ryng in a sowes nose.' 16070
WBT 785 Is lyk a gold ryng in a sowes nose.' 16070
WBT 794 And he up stirte as dooth a wood leoun, 16080
WBT 831 This is a long preamble of a tale! " 16116
WBT 831 This is a long preamble of a tale! " 16116
WBT 834 A frere wol entremette hym everemo. 16120
WBT 835 Lo, goode men, a flye and eek a frere 16120
WBT 835 Lo, goode men, a flye and eek a frere 16120
WBT 842 Telle of a somonour swich a tale or two 16128
WBT 842 Telle of a somonour swich a tale or two 16128
WBT 861 Daunced ful ofte in many a grene mede. 16146
WBT 883 Hadde in his hous a lusty bacheler, 16168
WBT 884 That on a day cam ridynge fro ryver, 16170
WBT 886 He saugh a mayde walkynge hym biforn, 16172
WBT 901 Whan that she saugh hir tyme, upon a day: 16186
WBT 909 A twelf-month and a day, to seche and leere 16194
WBT 909 A twelf-month and a day, to seche and leere 16194
WBT 932 A man shal wynne us best with flaterye, 16218
WBT 949 But that tale is nat worth a rake-stele. 16234
WBT 963 To make hir housbonde han so foul a name. 16248
WBT 966 That she so longe sholde a conseil hyde; 16252
WBT 970 Doun to a mareys faste by she ran -- 16256
WBT 972 And as a bitore bombleth in the myre, 16258
WBT 979 Heere may ye se, thogh we a tyme abyde, 16264
WBT 990 In al this care, under a forest syde, 16276
WBT 991 Wher as he saugh upon a daunce go 16276
WBT 998 Save on the grene he saugh sittynge a wyf -- 16284
WBT 999 A fouler wight ther may no man devyse. 16284
WBT 1018 That wereth on a coverchief or a calle 16304
WBT 1018 That wereth on a coverchief or a calle 16304
WBT 1021 Tho rowned she a pistel in his ere, 16306
WBT 1026 Ful many a noble wyf, and many a mayde, 16312
WBT 1026 Ful many a noble wyf, and many a mayde, 16312
WBT 1027 And many a wydwe, for that they been wise, 16312
WBT 1028 The queene hirself sittynge as a justise, 16314
WBT 1034 This knyght ne stood nat stille as doth a best, 16320
WBT 1060 For Goddes love, as chees a newe requeste! 16346
WBT 1095 Ye faren lyk a man had lost his wit. 16380
WBT 1101 And therto comen of so lough a kynde, 16386
WBT 1135 Unto a certeyn lynage doun the lyne, 16420
WBT 1151 A lordes sone do shame and vileynye; 16436
WBT 1153 For he was boren of a gentil hous 16438
WBT 1158 For vileyns synful dedes make a cherl. 16444
WBT 1161 Which is a strange thyng to thy persone. 16446
WBT 1182 Ne wolde nat chese a vicious lyvyng. 16468
WBT 1186 I holde hym riche, al hadde he nat a sherte. 16472
WBT 1187 He that coveiteth is a povre wight, 16472
WBT 1190 Is riche, although ye holde hym but a knave. 16476
WBT 1196 A ful greet bryngere out of bisynesse; 16482
WBT 1197 A greet amendere eek of sapience 16482
WBT 1201 Poverte ful ofte, whan a man is lowe, 16486
WBT 1203 Poverte a spectacle is, as thynketh me, 16488
WBT 1214 Than drede you noght to been a cokewold; 16500
WBT 1221 And be to yow a trewe, humble wyf, 16506
WBT 1253 His herte bathed in a bath of blisse. 16538
WBT 1254 A thousand tyme a-rewe he gan hire kisse, 16540
FrT 1266 He made alwey a maner louryng chiere 16552
FrT 1279 I wol yow of a somonour telle a game. 16564
FrT 1279 I wol yow of a somonour telle a game. 16564
FrT 1281 That of a somonour may no good be sayd; 16566
FrT 1283 A somonour is a rennere up and doun 16568
FrT 1283 A somonour is a rennere up and doun 16568
FrT 1286 Oure Hoost tho spak, " A, sire, ye sholde be hende 16572
FrT 1287 And curteys, as a man of youre estaat; 16572
FrT 1293 I shal hym tellen which a greet honour 16578
FrT 1294 It is to be a flaterynge lymytour, 16580
FrT 1302 An erchedeken, a man of heigh degree, 16588
FrT 1321 He hadde a somonour redy to his hond; 16606
FrT 1322 A slyer boye nas noon in Engelond; 16608
FrT 1344 He took hymself a greet profit therby; 16630
FrT 1346 Withouten mandement a lewed man 16632
FrT 1351 And was a theef, right swich a theef was he; 16636
FrT 1351 And was a theef, right swich a theef was he; 16636
FrT 1354 A theef, and eek a somnour, and a baude. 16640
FrT 1354 A theef, and eek a somnour, and a baude. 16640
FrT 1354 A theef, and eek a somnour, and a baude. 16640
FrT 1360 And he wolde fecche a feyned mandement, 16646
FrT 1371 Bet than this somnour knew a sly lecchour, 16656
FrT 1372 Or an avowtier, or a paramour. 16658
FrT 1375 And so bifel that ones on a day 16660
FrT 1377 Rood for to somne an old wydwe, a ribibe, 16662
FrT 1378 Feynynge a cause, for he wolde brybe. 16664
FrT 1380 A gay yeman, under a forest syde. 16666
FrT 1380 A gay yeman, under a forest syde. 16666
FrT 1381 A bowe he bar, and arwes brighte and kene; 16666
FrT 1382 He hadde upon a courtepy of grene, 16668
FrT 1390 To ryden, for to reysen up a rente 16676
FrT 1392 " Artow thanne a bailly? " " Ye, " quod he. 16678
FrT 1394 Seye that he was a somonour, for the name. 16680
FrT 1396 Thou art a bailly, and I am another. 16682
FrT 1419 Syn that ye been a baillif as am I, 16704
FrT 1425 " As I shal tellen thee a feithful tale, 16710
FrT 1446 This yeman gan a litel for to smyle. 16732
FrT 1448 I am a feend; my dwellyng is in helle, 16734
FrT 1455 Unto the worldes ende for a preye. " 16740
FrT 1456 " A! " quod this somonour, " benedicite! What sey ye? 16742
FrT 1457 I wende ye were a yeman trewely. 16742
FrT 1458 Ye han a mannes shap as wel as I; 16744
FrT 1459 Han ye a figure thanne determinat 16744
FrT 1464 Somtyme lyk a man, or lyk an ape, 16750
FrT 1467 A lowsy jogelour kan deceyve thee, 16752
FrT 1474 " Ful many a cause, leeve sire somonour, " 16760
FrT 1495 Upon a man and doon his soule unreste 16780
FrT 1498 It is a cause of his savacioun, 16784
FrT 1518 Konne in a chayer rede of this sentence 16804
FrT 1524 I am a yeman, knowen is ful wyde; 16810
FrT 1539 They saugh a cart that charged was with hey, 16824
FrT 1540 Which that a cartere droof forth in his wey. 16826
FrT 1548 This somonour seyde, " Heere shal we have a pley. " 16834
FrT 1555 " Nay, " quod the devel, " God woot, never a deel! 16840
FrT 1558 Or elles stynt a while, and thou shalt see. " 16844
FrT 1575 As for to yeve a peny of hir good. 16860
FrT 1586 " I have, " quod he, " of somonce here a bille; 16872
FrT 1592 I have been syk, and that ful many a day. 16878
FrT 1595 May I nat axe a libel, sire somonour, 16880
FrT 1638 Moore than a maister of dyvynytee. " 16924
FrT 1651 Thogh that I myghte a thousand wynter telle 16936
SumT 1676 How that a frere ravysshed was to helle 16962
SumT 1677 In spirit ones by a visioun; 16962
SumT 1680 In al the place saugh he nat a frere; 16966
SumT 1683 `Now, sire,' quod he, `han freres swich a grace 16968
SumT 1685 `Yis' quod this angel, `many a millioun!' 16970
SumT 1688 Brodder than of a carryk is the sayl. 16974
SumT 1692 And er that half a furlong wey of space, 16978
SumT 1695 Twenty thousand freres on a route, 16980
SumT 1710 A mersshy contree called Holdernesse, 16996
SumT 1711 In which ther wente a lymytour aboute 16996
SumT 1713 And so bifel that on a day this frere 16998
SumT 1714 Hadde preched at a chirche in his manere, 17000
SumT 1727 Nat for to holde a preest joly and gay -- 17012
SumT 1728 He syngeth nat but o masse in a day. 17014
SumT 1740 His felawe hadde a staf tipped with horn, 17026
SumT 1741 A peyre of tables al of yvory, 17026
SumT 1742 And a poyntel polysshed fetisly, 17028
SumT 1746 " Yif us a busshel whete, malt, or reye, 17032
SumT 1747 A Goddes kechyl, or a trype of chese, 17032
SumT 1747 A Goddes kechyl, or a trype of chese, 17032
SumT 1749 A Goddes halfpeny, or a masse peny, 17034
SumT 1749 A Goddes halfpeny, or a masse peny, 17034
SumT 1751 A dagon of youre blanket, leeve dame, 17036
SumT 1754 A sturdy harlot wente ay hem bihynde, 17040
SumT 1755 That was hir hostes man, and bar a sak, 17040
SumT 1769 Bedrede upon a couche lowe he lay. 17054
SumT 1774 Heere have I eten many a myrie meel. " 17060
SumT 1786 Have I seyd many a precious orison, 17072
SumT 1789 And seyd a sermon after my symple wit -- 17074
SumT 1793 Glosynge is a glorious thyng, certeyn, 17078
SumT 1797 And there I saugh oure dame -- A! Where is she? " 17082
SumT 1804 And kiste hire sweete, and chirketh as a sparwe 17090
SumT 1808 Yet saugh I nat this day so fair a wyf 17094
SumT 1815 I wole with Thomas speke a litel throwe. 17100
SumT 1817 To grope tendrely a conscience 17102
SumT 1825 He is as angry as a pissemyre, 17110
SumT 1834 Ire is a thyng that hye God defended, 17120
SumT 1835 And therof wol I speke a word or two. " 17120
SumT 1839 Have I nat of a capon but the lyvere, 17124
SumT 1840 And of youre softe breed nat but a shyvere, 17126
SumT 1841 And after that a rosted pigges heed -- 17126
SumT 1844 I am a man of litel sustenaunce; 17130
SumT 1850 By God! I wolde nat telle it but a fewe. " 17136
SumT 1864 With many a teere trillyng on my cheke, 17150
SumT 1888 With empty wombe, fastynge many a day, 17174
SumT 1920 But I shal fynde it in a maner glose, 17206
SumT 1930 Fat as a whale, and walkynge as a swan, 17216
SumT 1930 Fat as a whale, and walkynge as a swan, 17216
SumT 1938 Therfore, right as an hauk up at a sours 17224
SumT 1951 Ful many a pound; yet fare I never the bet. 17236
SumT 1956 What nedeth hym that hath a parfit leche 17242
SumT 1961 Thomas, that jape nys nat worth a myte. 17246
SumT 1963 A, yif that covent half a quarter otes! 17248
SumT 1963 A, yif that covent half a quarter otes! 17248
SumT 1964 A, yif that covent foure and twenty grotes! 17250
SumT 1965 A, yif that frere a peny, and lat hym go! 17250
SumT 1965 A, yif that frere a peny, and lat hym go! 17250
SumT 1967 What is a ferthyng worth parted in twelve? 17252
SumT 1999 Now sith ye han so hooly meke a wyf, 17284
SumT 2005 Ire is a synne, oon of the grete of sevene, 17290
SumT 2019 Upon a day out ryden knyghtes two, 17304
SumT 2044 And ay delited hym to been a shrewe. 17330
SumT 2045 And so bifel, a lord of his meynee 17330
SumT 2047 Seyde on a day bitwix hem two right thus: 17332
SumT 2049 And dronkenesse is eek a foul record 17334
SumT 2050 Of any man, and namely in a lord. 17336
SumT 2052 Awaityng on a lord, and he noot where. 17338
SumT 2069 `Now wheither have I a siker hand or noon?' 17354
SumT 2076 But if it be unto a povre man. 17362
SumT 2077 To a povre man men sholde his vices telle, 17362
SumT 2078 But nat to a lord, thogh he sholde go to helle. 17364
SumT 2090 Thou shalt me fynde as just as is a squyre. 17376
SumT 2100 Quod he, " for many a muscle and many an oystre, 17386
SumT 2105 Nys nat a tyle yet withinne oure wones. 17390
SumT 2143 A thyng that I have hyd in pryvetee. " 17428
SumT 2144 " A! " thoghte this frere, " That shal go with me! " 17430
SumT 2146 In hope for to fynde there a yifte. 17432
SumT 2149 Amydde his hand he leet the frere a fart; 17434
SumT 2150 Ther nys no capul, drawynge in a cart, 17436
SumT 2151 That myghte have lete a fart of swich a soun. 17436
SumT 2151 That myghte have lete a fart of swich a soun. 17436
SumT 2152 The frere up stirte as dooth a wood leoun -- 17438
SumT 2153 " A, false cherl, " quod he, " for Goddes bones! 17438
SumT 2158 And forth he gooth, with a ful angry cheere, 17444
SumT 2160 He looked as it were a wilde boor; 17446
SumT 2162 A sturdy paas doun to the court he gooth, 17448
SumT 2163 Wher as ther woned a man of greet honour, 17448
SumT 2166 This frere cam as he were in a rage, 17452
SumT 2168 Unnethes myghte the frere speke a word, 17454
SumT 2176 " I have, " quod he, " had a despit this day, 17462
SumT 2178 That in this world is noon so povre a page 17464
SumT 2206 I seye a cherl hath doon a cherles dede. 17492
SumT 2206 I seye a cherl hath doon a cherles dede. 17492
SumT 2209 I holde hym in a manere frenesye. " 17494
SumT 2216 The lord sat stille as he were in a traunce, 17502
SumT 2219 To shewe swich a probleme to the frere? 17504
SumT 2223 Biforn this day, of swich a question. 17508
SumT 2224 Who sholde make a demonstracion 17510
SumT 2226 As of the soun or savour of a fart? 17512
SumT 2229 Who evere herde of swich a thyng er now? 17514
SumT 2233 The rumblynge of a fart, and every soun, 17518
SumT 2240 I holde hym certeyn a demonyak! 17526
SumT 2242 Lat hym go honge hymself a devel weye! " 17528
SumT 2247 I koude telle, for a gowne-clooth, 17532
SumT 2252 A gowne-clooth, by God and by Seint John! " 17538
SumT 2255 Lat brynge a cartwheel heere into this halle; 17540
SumT 2257 Twelve spokes hath a cartwheel comunly. 17542
SumT 2259 For thrittene is a covent, as I gesse. 17544
SumT 2264 Ful sadly leye his nose shal a frere. 17550
SumT 2270 Upon the nave, and make hym lete a fart. 17556
SumT 2276 By cause he is a man of greet honour, 17562
SumT 2293 And Jankyn hath ywonne a newe gowne -- 17578
ClT 2 " Ye ryde as coy and stille as dooth a mayde 17582
ClT 4 This day ne herde I of youre tonge a word. 17584
ClT 10 For what man that is entred in a pley, 17590
ClT 26 I wol yow telle a tale which that I 17606
ClT 27 Lerned at Padowe of a worthy clerk, 17606
ClT 37 But as it were a twynklyng of an ye, 17616
ClT 43 A prohemye, in the which discryveth he 17622
ClT 48 Where as the Poo out of a welle smal 17628
ClT 52 The which a long thyng were to devyse. 17632
ClT 54 Me thynketh it a thyng impertinent, 17634
ClT 59 A lusty playn, habundant of vitaille, 17638
ClT 60 Where many a tour and toun thou mayst biholde, 17640
ClT 64 A markys whilom lord was of that lond, 17644
ClT 73 A fair persone, and strong, and yong of age, 17652
ClT 86 That flokmeele on a day they to hym wente, 17666
ClT 103 I dar the bettre aske of yow a space 17682
ClT 111 That for to been a wedded man yow leste; 17690
ClT 130 Chese yow a wyf, in short tyme atte leeste, 17710
ClT 135 And taak a wyf, for hye Goddes sake! 17714
ClT 138 And that a straunge successour sholde take 17718
ClT 153 To chese me a wyf, I yow relesse 17732
ClT 179 That he wolde graunten hem a certein day 17758
ClT 183 He graunted hem a day, swich as hym leste, 17762
ClT 199 There stood a throop, of site delitable, 17778
ClT 204 Amonges thise povre folk ther dwelte a man 17784
ClT 207 His grace into a litel oxes stalle; 17786
ClT 209 A doghter hadde he, fair ynogh to sighte, 17788
ClT 223 A fewe sheep, spynnynge, on feeld she kepte; 17802
ClT 248 For which merveille wondred many a man, 17828
ClT 257 By a mayde lyk to hire stature, 17836
ClT 259 That unto swich a weddyng sholde falle. 17838
ClT 271 With many a soun of sondry melodye, 17850
ClT 276 To fecchen water at a welle is went, 17856
ClT 325 Have a collacioun, and wostow why? 17904
ClT 336 For nevere erst ne saugh she swich a sighte. 17916
ClT 338 To seen so greet a gest come in that place; 17918
ClT 366 And forth he gooth with a ful sobre cheere 17946
ClT 381 A corone on hire heed they han ydressed, 17960
ClT 383 Of hire array what sholde I make a tale? 17962
ClT 386 This markys hath hire spoused with a ryng 17966
ClT 398 As in a cote or in an oxe-stalle, 17978
ClT 416 But eek biside in many a regioun, 17996
ClT 427 A prudent man, and that is seyn ful seelde. 18006
ClT 443 Was wedded, she a doghter hath ybore, 18022
ClT 444 Al had hire levere have born a knave child; 18024
ClT 446 For though a mayde child coome al bifore, 18026
ClT 447 She may unto a knave child atteyne 18026
ClT 450 Whan that this child had souked but a throwe, 18030
ClT 459 Though som men preise it for a subtil wit? 18038
ClT 461 To assaye a wyf whan that it is no nede, 18040
ClT 483 To thee, that born art of a smal village. 18062
ClT 516 Soone after this, a furlong wey or two, 18096
ClT 518 Unto a man, and to his wyf hym sente. 18098
ClT 519 A maner sergeant was this privee man, 18098
ClT 535 Despitously, and gan a cheere make 18114
ClT 538 And as a lamb she sitteth meke and stille, 18118
ClT 549 So as he was a worthy gentil man, 18128
ClT 558 That for us deyde upon a croys of tree, 18138
ClT 561 I trowe that to a norice in this cas 18140
ClT 563 Wel myghte a mooder thanne han cryd " allas! " 18142
ClT 585 And carie it in a cofre or in a lappe; 18164
ClT 585 And carie it in a cofre or in a lappe; 18164
ClT 606 Ne of hir doghter noght a word spak she. 18186
ClT 612 A knave child she bar by this Walter, 18192
ClT 618 Departed of his norice, on a day 18198
ClT 623 Whan that they fynde a pacient creature. 18202
ClT 698 What koude a sturdy housbonde moore devyse 18278
ClT 702 That whan they have a certein purpos take, 18282
ClT 720 A wyf, as of hirself, nothing ne sholde 18300
ClT 723 That of a crueel herte he wikkedly, 18302
ClT 724 For he a povre womman wedded hadde, 18304
ClT 732 To been a mordrere is an hateful name; 18312
ClT 762 A lettre, in which he sheweth his entente, 18342
ClT 790 He on a day in open audience 18370
ClT 834 " Ther I was fostred of a child ful smal, 18414
ClT 836 A wydwe clene in body, herte, and al. 18416
ClT 839 God shilde swich a lordes wyf to take 18418
ClT 876 " Ye koude nat doon so dishonest a thyng, 18456
ClT 880 Lat me nat lyk a worm go by the weye. 18460
ClT 886 But swich a smok as I was wont to were, 18466
ClT 903 Shoop hym to been a lyves creature. 18482
ClT 908 Hym wolde thynke it were a disparage 18488
ClT 918 Thus with hire fader for a certeyn space 18498
ClT 935 Though clerkes preise wommen but a lite, 18514
ClT 942 Was kouth eek that a newe markysesse 18522
ClT 996 Ay undiscreet and chaungynge as a fane! 18576
ClT 999 Ay ful of clappyng, deere ynogh a jane! 18578
ClT 1001 A ful greet fool is he that on yow leeveth. " 18580
ClT 1005 To han a newe lady of hir toun. 18584
ClT 1033 A fairer saugh I nevere noon than she. 18612
ClT 1043 As koude a povre fostred creature. " 18622
ClT 1047 And she ay sad and constant as a wal, 18626
ClT 1060 She ferde as she had stert out of a sleep, 18640
ClT 1084 Ful lyk a mooder, with hire salte teeres 18664
ClT 1086 O which a pitous thyng it was to se 18666
ClT 1104 O many a teere on many a pitous face 18684
ClT 1104 O many a teere on many a pitous face 18684
ClT 1117 And in a clooth of gold that brighte shoon, 18696
ClT 1118 With a coroune of many a riche stoon 18698
ClT 1118 With a coroune of many a riche stoon 18698
ClT 1121 Thus hath this pitous day a blisful ende, 18700
ClT 1128 Ful many a yeer in heigh prosperitee 18708
ClT 1131 Unto a lord, oon of the worthieste 18710
ClT 1149 For sith a womman was so pacient 18728
ClT 1150 Unto a mortal man, wel moore us oghte 18730
ClT 1165 In al a toun Grisildis thre or two; 18744
ClT 1174 Seyn yow a song to glade yow, I wene; 18754
ClT 1186 To write of yow a storie of swich mervaille 18766
ClT 1196 Syn ye be strong as is a greet camaille; 18776
ClT 1199 Beth egre as is a tygre yond in Ynde; 18778
ClT 1200 Ay clappeth as a mille, I yow consaille. 18780
ClT 1206 And thou shalt make hym couche as doth a quaille. 18786
ClT 1212c Me were levere than a barel ale 18794
ClT 1212e This is a gentil tale for the nones, 18796
MerT 1218 I have a wyf, the worste that may be; 18804
MerT 1222 Hir hye malice? She is a shrewe at al. 18808
MerT 1223 Ther is a long and large difference 18810
MerT 1233 " A, goode sire Hoost, I have ywedded bee 18820
MerT 1246 A worthy knyght, that born was of Pavye, 18832
MerT 1248 And sixty yeer a wyflees man was hee, 18834
MerT 1254 I kan nat seye, but swich a greet corage 18840
MerT 1255 Hadde this knyght to been a wedded man 18842
MerT 1263 " Noon oother lyf, " seyde he, " is worth a bene, 18850
MerT 1265 That in this world it is a paradys. " 18852
MerT 1268 To take a wyf it is a glorious thyng, 18854
MerT 1268 To take a wyf it is a glorious thyng, 18854
MerT 1269 And namely whan a man is oold and hoor; 18856
MerT 1270 Thanne is a wyf the fruyt of his tresor. 18856
MerT 1271 Thanne sholde he take a yong wyf and a feir, 18858
MerT 1271 Thanne sholde he take a yong wyf and a feir, 18858
MerT 1281 They lyve but as a bryd or as a beest, 18868
MerT 1281 They lyve but as a bryd or as a beest, 18868
MerT 1283 Ther as a wedded man in his estaat 18870
MerT 1284 Lyveth a lyf blisful and ordinaat 18870
MerT 1287 For who kan be so buxom as a wyf? 18874
MerT 1298 A trewe servant dooth moore diligence 18884
MerT 1302 Thy verray freendes, or a trewe knave, 18888
MerT 1304 After thy good and hath doon many a day. 18890
MerT 1305 And if thou take a wyf unto thyn hoold 18892
MerT 1306 Ful lightly maystow been a cokewold. " 18892
MerT 1311 A wyf is Goddes yifte verraily; 18898
MerT 1315 That passen as a shadwe upon a wal. 18902
MerT 1315 That passen as a shadwe upon a wal. 18902
MerT 1317 A wyf wol laste, and in thyn hous endure, 18904
MerT 1319 Mariage is a ful greet sacrement. 18906
MerT 1337 A wyf! a, Seinte Marie, benedicite! 18924
MerT 1337 A wyf! a, Seinte Marie, benedicite! 18924
MerT 1338 How myghte a man han any adversitee 18924
MerT 1339 That hath a wyf? Certes, I kan nat seye. 18926
MerT 1343 She kepeth his good, and wasteth never a deel; 18930
MerT 1350 That every man that halt hym worth a leek 18936
MerT 1352 Thanken his God that hym hath sent a wyf, 18938
MerT 1354 A wyf to laste unto his lyves ende. 18940
MerT 1380 A wyf is kepere of thyn housbondrye; 18966
MerT 1397 And for his freendes on a day he sente, 18984
MerT 1405 For I wol be, certeyn, a wedded man, 18992
MerT 1413 Ye shullen rather swich a thyng espyen 19000
MerT 1419 Bet is, " quod he, " a pyk than a pykerel, 19006
MerT 1419 Bet is, " quod he, " a pyk than a pykerel, 19006
MerT 1428 Womman of manye scoles half a clerk is. 19014
MerT 1429 But certeynly, a yong thyng may men gye, 19016
MerT 1431 Wherfore I sey yow pleynly, in a clause, 19018
MerT 1443 Ther speketh many a man of mariage 19030
MerT 1445 For whiche causes man sholde take a wyf. 19032
MerT 1447 Take hym a wyf with greet devocioun, 19034
MerT 1454 In meschief, as a suster shal the brother, 19040
MerT 1459 To do al that a man bilongeth to; 19046
MerT 1461 Though I be hoor, I fare as dooth a tree 19048
MerT 1475 Ther fil a stryf bitwixe his bretheren two, 19062
MerT 1487 But though that Salomon spak swich a word, 19074
MerT 1492 I have now been a court-man al my lyf, 19078
MerT 1501 A ful greet fool is any conseillour 19088
MerT 1515 To take a yong wyf; by my fader kyn, 19102
MerT 1516 Youre herte hangeth on a joly pyn! 19102
MerT 1524 Seith that a man oghte hym right wel avyse 19110
MerT 1531 To take a wyf withouten avysement. 19118
MerT 1534 Or proud, or elles ootherweys a shrewe, 19120
MerT 1535 A chidestere, or wastour of thy good, 19122
MerT 1544 For, God it woot, I have wept many a teere 19130
MerT 1545 Ful pryvely, syn I have had a wyf. 19132
MerT 1546 Preyse whoso wole a wedded mannes lyf, 19132
MerT 1550 And namely of wommen many a route, 19136
MerT 1555 Avyseth yow -- ye been a man of age -- 19142
MerT 1557 And namely with a yong wyf and a fair. 19144
MerT 1557 And namely with a yong wyf and a fair. 19144
MerT 1564 A wyf axeth ful many an observaunce. 19150
MerT 1568 I counte nat a panyer ful of herbes 19154
MerT 1572 " I seye it is a cursed man, " quod he, 19158
MerT 1580 Many fair shap and many a fair visage 19166
MerT 1582 As whoso tooke a mirour, polisshed bryght, 19168
MerT 1583 And sette it in a commune market-place, 19170
MerT 1584 Thanne sholde he se ful many a figure pace 19170
MerT 1618 And alderfirst he bad hem alle a boone, 19204
MerT 1623 He seyde ther was a mayden in the toun, 19210
MerT 1645 That I shal lede now so myrie a lyf, 19232
MerT 1666 A wedded man hym grace to repente 19252
MerT 1667 Wel ofte rather than a sengle man! 19254
MerT 1673 Swifter than dooth an arwe out of a bowe. 19260
MerT 1717 Ne maden nevere swich a melodye. 19304
MerT 1731 Saugh nevere his lyf so myrie a wedded man. 19318
MerT 1742 Mayus, that sit with so benyngne a chiere, 19328
MerT 1745 On Assuer, so meke a look hath she. 19332
MerT 1750 This Januarie is ravysshed in a traunce 19336
MerT 1772 Al but a squyer, highte Damyan, 19358
MerT 1773 Which carf biforn the knyght ful many a day. 19360
MerT 1809 And many a letuarie hath he ful fyn, 19396
MerT 1839 A man may do no synne with his wyf, 19426
MerT 1843 And thanne he taketh a sop in fyn clarree, 19430
MerT 1848 And ful of jargon as a flekked pye. 19434
MerT 1854 She preyseth nat his pleyyng worth a bene. 19440
MerT 1879 But prively a penner gan he borwe, 19466
MerT 1880 And in a lettre wroot he al his sorwe, 19466
MerT 1881 In manere of a compleynt or a lay, 19468
MerT 1881 In manere of a compleynt or a lay, 19468
MerT 1883 And in a purs of sylk heng on his sherte 19470
MerT 1890 A bryde shal nat eten in the halle 19476
MerT 1907 " He is a gentil squier, by my trouthe! 19494
MerT 1912 And for to been a thrifty man right able. 19498
MerT 1919 His squier, for it was a gentil dede. 19506
MerT 1924 Dooth hym disport -- he is a gentil man; 19510
MerT 1926 Have I no thyng but rested me a lite; 19512
MerT 1930 A squier, that was marchal of his halle, 19516
MerT 1971 Was for to putte a bille of Venus werkes -- 19558
MerT 1996 Right of hire hand a lettre made she, 19582
MerT 2001 And whan she saugh hir tyme, upon a day 19588
MerT 2014 As evere dide a dogge for the bowe. 19600
MerT 2024 In honest wyse, as longeth to a knyght, 19610
MerT 2027 To his degree was maked as a kynges. 19614
MerT 2029 He made a gardyn, walled al with stoon; 19616
MerT 2030 So fair a gardyn woot I nowher noon. 19616
MerT 2037 That stood under a laurer alwey grene. 19624
MerT 2046 He baar alwey of silver a clyket, 19632
MerT 2053 And in this wyse, many a murye day, 19640
MerT 2081 But atte laste, after a month or tweye, 19668
MerT 2100 Ne myghte he speke a word to fresshe May, 19686
MerT 2110 As to be deceyved whan a man may se. 19696
MerT 2130 They been accorded, rownynge thurgh a wal, 19716
MerT 2131 Ther no wight koude han founde out swich a sleighte. 19718
MerT 2134 That Januarie hath caught so greet a wil, 19720
MerT 2137 That in a morwe unto his May seith he: 19724
MerT 2150 On Damyan a signe made she, 19736
MerT 2155 And stille he sit under a bussh anon. 19742
MerT 2156 This Januarie, as blynd as is a stoon, 19742
MerT 2163 Levere ich hadde to dyen on a knyf 19750
MerT 2188 " I have, " quod she, " a soule for to kepe 19774
MerT 2200 Do strepe me and put me in a sak, 19786
MerT 2202 I am a gentil womman and no wenche. 19788
MerT 2210 That Damyan sholde clymbe upon a tree 19796
MerT 2215 For in a lettre she hadde toold hym al 19802
MerT 2228 And many a lady in his compaignye, 19814
MerT 2235 Upon a bench of turves, fressh and grene, 19822
MerT 2247 `Amonges a thousand men yet foond I oon, 19834
MerT 2252 A wylde fyr and corrupt pestilence 19838
MerT 2272 Al hadde man seyn a thyng with bothe his yen, 19858
MerT 2285 Of many a verray, trewe wyf also. 19872
MerT 2293 What though he made a temple, Goddes hous? 19880
MerT 2295 So made he eek a temple of false goddis. 19882
MerT 2296 How myghte he do a thyng that moore forbode is? 19882
MerT 2298 He was a lecchour and an ydolastre, 19884
MerT 2304 That ye of wommen write, a boterflye! 19890
MerT 2305 I am a womman, nedes moot I speke, 19892
MerT 2315 I am a kyng; it sit me noght to lye. " 19902
MerT 2316 " And I, " quod she, " a queene of Fayerye! 19902
MerT 2335 I telle yow wel, a womman in my plit 19922
MerT 2338 " Allas, " quod he, " that I ne had heer a knave 19924
MerT 2349 And caughte hire by a twiste, and up she gooth -- 19936
MerT 2351 I kan nat glose, I am a rude man -- 19938
MerT 2364 And up he yaf a roryng and a cry, 19950
MerT 2364 And up he yaf a roryng and a cry, 19950
MerT 2374 Than strugle with a man upon a tree. 19960
MerT 2374 Than strugle with a man upon a tree. 19960
MerT 2397 But, sire, a man that waketh out of his sleep, 19984
MerT 2399 Upon a thyng, ne seen it parfitly, 19986
MerT 2401 Right so a man that longe hath blynd ybe, 19988
MerT 2404 As he that hath a day or two yseyn. 19990
MerT 2405 Til that youre sighte ysatled be a while 19992
MerT 2406 Ther may ful many a sighte yow bigile. 19992
MerT 2408 Ful many a man weneth to seen a thyng, 19994
MerT 2408 Ful many a man weneth to seen a thyng, 19994
MerT 2420 " Now swich a wyf I pray God kepe me fro! 20006
MerT 2427 I have a wyf, though that she povre be, 20014
MerT 2428 But of hir tonge, a labbyng shrewe is she, 20014
SqT 6 Agayn youre lust; a tale wol I telle. 20032
SqT 10 Ther dwelte a kyng that werreyed Russye, 20036
SqT 11 Thurgh which ther dyde many a doughty man. 20038
SqT 15 So excellent a lord in alle thyng: 20042
SqT 16 Hym lakked noght that longeth to a kyng. 20042
SqT 25 A fair persone he was and fortunat, 20052
SqT 32 A doghter hadde this worthy kyng also, 20058
SqT 36 I dar nat undertake so heigh a thyng. 20062
SqT 38 It moste been a rethor excellent 20064
SqT 64 Thanne wolde it occupie a someres day, 20090
SqT 81 Ther cam a knyght upon a steede of bras, 20108
SqT 81 Ther cam a knyght upon a steede of bras, 20108
SqT 82 And in his hand a brood mirour of glas. 20108
SqT 83 Upon his thombe he hadde of gold a ryng, 20110
SqT 84 And by his syde a naked swerd hangyng; 20110
SqT 86 In al the halle ne was ther spoken a word 20112
SqT 97 Ne koude hym nat amende with a word. 20124
SqT 99 He with a manly voys seide his message, 20126
SqT 106 Ne kan nat clymben over so heigh a style, 20132
SqT 127 And turne ayeyn with writhyng of a pyn. 20154
SqT 128 He that it wroghte koude ful many a gyn. 20154
SqT 129 He wayted many a constellacion 20156
SqT 131 And knew ful many a seel and many a bond. 20158
SqT 131 And knew ful many a seel and many a bond. 20158
SqT 133 Hath swich a myght that men may in it see 20160
SqT 159 Were it as thikke as is a branched ook; 20186
SqT 166 This is a verray sooth, withouten glose; 20192
SqT 193 Right as it were a steede of Lumbardye; 20220
SqT 195 As it a gentil Poilleys courser were. 20222
SqT 201 It was a fairye, as the peple semed. 20228
SqT 204 They murmureden as dooth a swarm of been, 20230
SqT 248 And seyden alle that swich a wonder thyng 20274
SqT 251 Hadde a name of konnyng in swich art. 20278
SqT 274 And looketh on hem with a freendly ye. 20300
SqT 279 That is nat able a dul man to devyse. 20306
SqT 281 And been a feestlych man as fressh as May, 20308
SqT 299 Ech man woot wel that a kynges feeste 20326
SqT 303 To seen this hors of bras, with al a route 20330
SqT 308 Ne was ther swich a wondryng as was tho. 20334
SqT 316 Ye mooten trille a pyn, stant in his ere, 20342
SqT 332 In swich a gyse as I shal to yow seyn 20358
SqT 350 And with a galpyng mouth hem alle he keste, 20376
SqT 368 For swich a joye she in hir herte took 20394
SqT 372 Of hire mirour, she hadde a visioun. 20398
SqT 382 Hire maistresse clepeth wommen a greet route, 20408
SqT 383 And up they rysen, wel a ten or twelve; 20410
SqT 388 And forth she walketh esily a pas, 20414
SqT 392 And in a trench forth in the park gooth she. 20418
SqT 395 But nathelees it was so fair a sighte 20422
SqT 409 Amydde a tree, for drye as whit as chalk, 20436
SqT 411 Ther sat a faucon over hire heed ful hye, 20438
SqT 412 That with a pitous voys so gan to crye 20438
SqT 424 If that I koude a faucon wel discryve, 20450
SqT 428 A faucon peregryn thanne semed she 20454
SqT 444 A longe whil to wayten hire she stood 20470
SqT 452 That causen moost a gentil herte wo; 20478
SqT 465 And as I am a kynges doghter trewe, 20492
SqT 474 And lith aswowne, deed and lyk a stoon, 20500
SqT 493 Whil that I have a leyser and a space, 20520
SqT 493 Whil that I have a leyser and a space, 20520
SqT 498 And, with a syk, right thus she seyde hir wille: 20524
SqT 500 And fostred in a roche of marbul gray 20526
SqT 504 Tho dwelte a tercelet me faste by, 20530
SqT 512 Right as a serpent hit hym under floures 20538
SqT 518 As in a toumbe is al the faire above, 20544
SqT 524 And many a yeer his service to me feyned, 20550
SqT 536 But sooth is seyd, goon sithen many a day, 20562
SqT 537 `A trewe wight and a theef thenken nat oon.' 20564
SqT 540 In swich a gyse as I have seyd above, 20566
SqT 546 So lyk a gentil lovere of manere, 20572
SqT 557 Ne so koude thonke a wight as he dide me! 20584
SqT 574 " This laste lenger than a yeer or two, 20600
SqT 584 So on a day of me he took his leve, 20610
SqT 590 Withinne a litel while, sooth to seyn; 20616
SqT 602 `Therfore bihoveth hire a ful long spoon 20628
SqT 603 That shal ete with a feend,' thus herde I seye. 20630
SqT 624 He saugh upon a tyme a kyte flee, 20650
SqT 624 He saugh upon a tyme a kyte flee, 20650
SqT 643 And by hire beddes heed she made a mewe 20670
SqT 662 That in his tyme many a citee wan; 20688
SqT 682 I have a sone, and by the Trinitee, 20708
SqT 685 He were a man of swich discrecioun 20712
SqT 687 But if a man be vertuous withal! 20714
SqT 692 And he hath levere talken with a page 20718
SqT 698 A tale or two, or breken his biheste. " 20724
SqT 701 Though to this man I speke a word or two. " 20728
FranT 716 But, sires, by cause I am a burel man, 20742
FranT 730 Ther was a knyght that loved and dide his payne 20756
FranT 731 To serve a lady in his beste wise; 20758
FranT 732 And many a labour, many a greet emprise, 20758
FranT 732 And many a labour, many a greet emprise, 20758
FranT 740 Hath swich a pitee caught of his penaunce 20766
FranT 745 Of his free wyl he swoor hire as a knyght 20772
FranT 755 Ye profre me to have so large a reyne, 20782
FranT 767 Love is a thyng as any spirit free. 20794
FranT 769 And nat to been constreyned as a thral; 20796
FranT 784 On every wrong a man may nat be wreken. 20810
FranT 806 A yeer and moore lasted this blisful lyf, 20832
FranT 809 Shoop hym to goon and dwelle a yeer or tweyne 20836
FranT 830 Men may so longe graven in a stoon 20856
FranT 850 Where as she many a ship and barge seigh 20876
FranT 852 But thanne was that a parcel of hire wo, 20878
FranT 869 That semen rather a foul confusion 20896
FranT 871 Of swich a parfit wys God and a stable, 20898
FranT 871 Of swich a parfit wys God and a stable, 20898
FranT 881 Thanne semed it ye hadde a greet chiertee 20908
FranT 894 Thus wolde she seyn, with many a pitous teere. 20920
FranT 901 So on a day, right in the morwe-tyde, 20928
FranT 902 Unto a gardyn that was ther bisyde, 20928
FranT 923 But nathelees she moste a tyme abyde 20950
FranT 926 Daunced a squier biforn Dorigen, 20952
FranT 945 His wo, as in a general compleynyng; 20972
FranT 950 But langwissheth as a furye dooth in helle; 20976
FranT 958 In swich a wise as man that asketh grace; 20984
FranT 962 And was a man of worshipe and honour, 20988
FranT 975 For with a word ye may me sleen or save. 21002
FranT 1003 What deyntee sholde a man han in his lyf 21030
FranT 1008 And with a sorweful herte he thus answerde: 21034
FranT 1059 As preieth hire so greet a flood to brynge 21086
FranT 1081 And longe tyme he lay forth in a traunce. 21108
FranT 1105 Save of his brother, which that was a clerk. 21132
FranT 1113 And wel ye knowe that of a sursanure 21140
FranT 1123 He hym remembred that, upon a day, 21150
FranT 1124 At Orliens in studie a book he say 21150
FranT 1126 That was that tyme a bacheler of lawe, 21152
FranT 1132 As in oure dayes is nat worth a flye -- 21158
FranT 1144 Have maad come in a water and a barge, 21170
FranT 1144 Have maad come in a water and a barge, 21170
FranT 1146 Somtyme hath semed come a grym leoun; 21172
FranT 1147 And somtyme floures sprynge as in a mede; 21174
FranT 1148 Somtyme a vyne, and grapes white and rede; 21174
FranT 1149 Somtyme a castel, al of lym and stoon; 21176
FranT 1157 For with an apparence a clerk may make, 21184
FranT 1161 And in swich forme enduren a wowke or two. 21188
FranT 1165 What sholde I make a lenger tale of this? 21192
FranT 1172 But if it were a two furlong or thre, 21198
FranT 1173 A yong clerk romynge by hymself they mette, 21200
FranT 1175 And after that he seyde a wonder thyng: 21202
FranT 1182 For which he weep ful ofte many a teere. 21208
FranT 1196 Thise fauconers upon a fair ryver, 21222
FranT 1198 Tho saugh he knyghtes justyng in a playn; 21224
FranT 1200 That he hym shewed his lady on a daunce, 21226
FranT 1224 Lasse than a thousand pound he wolde nat have, 21250
FranT 1227 Answerde thus: " Fy on a thousand pound! 21254
FranT 1238 His woful herte of penaunce hadde a lisse. 21264
FranT 1260 Or with a swerd that he wolde slitte his herte. 21286
FranT 1263 To wayten a tyme of his conclusioun; 21290
FranT 1272 Of swich a supersticious cursednesse. 21298
FranT 1295 But thurgh his magik, for a wyke or tweye, 21322
FranT 1326 But in a gardyn yond, at swich a place, 21352
FranT 1326 But in a gardyn yond, at swich a place, 21352
FranT 1340 In al hir face nas a drope of blood. 21366
FranT 1341 She wende nevere han come in swich a trappe. 21368
FranT 1344 That swich a monstre or merveille myghte be! 21370
FranT 1346 And hoom she goth a sorweful creature; 21372
FranT 1348 She wepeth, wailleth, al a day or two, 21374
FranT 1361 My lif than of my body to have a shame, 21388
FranT 1364 Hath ther nat many a noble wyf er this, 21390
FranT 1365 And many a mayde, yslayn hirself, allas, 21392
FranT 1377 They prively been stirt into a welle 21404
FranT 1383 That she nas slayn, and with a good entente 21410
FranT 1388 That loved a mayden, heet Stymphalides, 21414
FranT 1389 Whan that hir fader slayn was on a nyght, 21416
FranT 1397 Wel oghte a wyf rather hirselven slee 21424
FranT 1407 Of Tarquyn, for hire thoughte it was a shame 21434
FranT 1412 Mo than a thousand stories, as I gesse, 21438
FranT 1431 As greet a pitee was it, or wel moore, 21458
FranT 1442 Lo, which a wyf was Alceste, " quod she. 21468
FranT 1454 To alle wyves may a mirour bee. 21480
FranT 1457 Thus pleyned Dorigen a day or tweye, 21484
FranT 1487 And forth he cleped a squier and a mayde: 21514
FranT 1487 And forth he cleped a squier and a mayde: 21514
FranT 1489 " And bryngeth hire to swich a place anon. " 21516
FranT 1494 Wol holden hym a lewed man in this 21520
FranT 1523 Than doon so heigh a cherlyssh wrecchednesse 21550
FranT 1543 Thus kan a squier doon a gentil dede 21570
FranT 1543 Thus kan a squier doon a gentil dede 21570
FranT 1544 As wel as kan a knyght, withouten drede. " 21570
FranT 1554 He cherisseth hire as though she were a queene, 21580
FranT 1560 Of pured gold a thousand pound of wighte 21586
FranT 1564 And been a beggere; heere may I nat dwelle 21590
FranT 1599 How looth hire was to been a wikked wyf, 21626
FranT 1609 Thou art a squier, and he is a knyght; 21636
FranT 1609 Thou art a squier, and he is a knyght; 21636
FranT 1611 But if a clerk koude doon a gentil dede 21638
FranT 1611 But if a clerk koude doon a gentil dede 21638
FranT 1616 For, sire, I wol nat taken a peny of thee 21642
PhyT 2 A knyght that called was Virginius, 21652
PhyT 5 This knyght a doghter hadde by his wyf; 21656
PhyT 12 Thus kan I forme and peynte a creature, 21662
PhyT 32 For right as she kan peynte a lilie whit, 21682
PhyT 33 And reed a rose, right with swich peynture 21684
PhyT 40 A thousand foold moore vertuous was she. 21690
PhyT 71 Of booldnesse, whan she woxen is a wyf. 21722
PhyT 83 A theef of venysoun, that hath forlaft 21734
PhyT 85 Kan kepe a forest best of any man. 21736
PhyT 89 For whoso dooth, a traitour is, certeyn. 21740
PhyT 92 Is whan a wight bitrayseth innocence. 21742
PhyT 101 Under a shepherde softe and necligent 21752
PhyT 102 The wolf hath many a sheep and lamb torent. 21752
PhyT 108 As in a book, every good word or dede 21758
PhyT 109 That longeth to a mayden vertuous, 21760
PhyT 118 This mayde upon a day wente in the toun 21768
PhyT 119 Toward a temple, with hire mooder deere, 21770
PhyT 121 Now was ther thanne a justice in that toun, 21772
PhyT 140 He sente after a cherl, was in the toun, 21790
PhyT 160 And so bifel soone after, on a day, 21810
PhyT 164 This false cherl cam forth a ful greet pas, 21814
PhyT 180 How that a knyght, called Virginius, 21830
PhyT 184 Which fro myn hous was stole upon a nyght, 21834
PhyT 193 And wolde have preeved it as sholde a knyght, 21844
PhyT 194 And eek by witnessyng of many a wight, 21844
PhyT 197 Ne heere a word moore of Virginius, 21848
PhyT 209 And with a face deed as asshen colde 21860
PhyT 217 To dyen with a swerd or with a knyf. 21868
PhyT 217 To dyen with a swerd or with a knyf. 21868
PhyT 239 " My deeth for to compleyne a litel space; 21890
PhyT 248 " Blissed be God that I shal dye a mayde! 21898
PhyT 249 Yif me my deeth, er that I have a shame; 21900
PhyT 250 Dooth with youre child youre wyl, a Goddes name! " 21900
PhyT 260 But right anon a thousand peple in thraste, 21910
PhyT 268 And caste hym in a prisoun right anon, 21918
PhyT 271 Was demed for to hange upon a tree, 21922
PardT 289 This was a fals cherl and a fals justise. 21940
PardT 289 This was a fals cherl and a fals justise. 21940
PardT 296 Been cause of deeth to many a creature. 21946
PardT 302 This is a pitous tale for to heere. 21952
PardT 309 So moot I theen, thou art a propre man, 21960
PardT 310 And lyk a prelat, by Seint Ronyan! 21960
PardT 313 That I almoost have caught a cardynacle. 21964
PardT 315 Or elles a draughte of moyste and corny ale, 21966
PardT 316 Or but I heere anon a myrie tale, 21966
PardT 322 I wol bothe drynke and eten of a cake. " 21972
PardT 331 And rynge it out as round as gooth a belle, 21982
PardT 344 And in Latyn I speke a wordes fewe, 21994
PardT 350 Thanne have I in latoun a sholder-boon 22000
PardT 360 Drynketh a draughte. Taak kep eek what I telle: 22010
PardT 363 Fastynge, drynken of this welle a draughte, 22014
PardT 367 For though a man be falle in jalous rage, 22018
PardT 372 `Heere is a miteyn eek, that ye may se. 22022
PardT 386 He wol come up and offre a Goddes name, 22036
PardT 391 I stonde lyk a clerk in my pulpet, 22042
PardT 397 As dooth a dowve sittynge on a berne. 22048
PardT 397 As dooth a dowve sittynge on a berne. 22048
PardT 407 For certes, many a predicacioun 22058
PardT 450 Or of the povereste wydwe in a village, 22100
PardT 453 And have a joly wenche in every toun. 22104
PardT 455 Youre likyng is that I shal telle a tale. 22106
PardT 456 Now have I dronke a draughte of corny ale, 22106
PardT 457 By God, I hope I shal yow telle a thyng 22108
PardT 459 For though myself be a ful vicious man, 22110
PardT 460 A moral tale yet I yow telle kan, 22110
PardT 463 In Flaundres whilom was a compaignye 22114
PardT 492 Senec seith a good word doutelees; 22142
PardT 494 Bitwix a man that is out of his mynde 22144
PardT 495 And a man which that is dronkelewe, 22146
PardT 496 But that woodnesse, yfallen in a shrewe, 22146
PardT 513 O, wiste a man how manye maladyes 22164
PardT 520 To gete a glotoun deyntee mete and drynke! 22170
PardT 524 Allas, a foul thyng is it, by my feith, 22174
PardT 546 To make hym yet a newer appetit. 22196
PardT 549 A lecherous thyng is wyn, and dronkenesse 22200
PardT 556 Thou fallest as it were a styked swyn; 22206
PardT 568 That whan a man hath dronken draughtes thre, 22218
PardT 582 A capitayn sholde lyve in sobrenesse. 22232
PardT 596 For to ben holde a commune hasardour. 22246
PardT 599 If that a prynce useth hasardrye, 22250
PardT 603 Stilboun, that was a wys embassadour, 22254
PardT 623 Sente him a paire of dees of gold in scorn, 22274
PardT 630 A word or two, as olde bookes trete. 22280
PardT 631 Gret sweryng is a thyng abhominable, 22282
PardT 638 But ydel sweryng is a cursednesse. 22288
PardT 644 Than homycide or many a cursed thyng; 22294
PardT 663 Were set hem in a taverne to drynke, 22314
PardT 664 And as they sat, they herde a belle clynke 22314
PardT 665 Biforn a cors, was caried to his grave. 22316
PardT 675 Ther cam a privee theef men clepeth Deeth, 22326
PardT 679 He hath a thousand slayn this pestilence. 22330
PardT 687 Henne over a mile, withinne a greet village, 22338
PardT 687 Henne over a mile, withinne a greet village, 22338
PardT 691 Er that he dide a man a dishonour. " 22342
PardT 691 Er that he dide a man a dishonour. " 22342
PardT 708 And many a grisly ooth thanne han they sworn, 22358
PardT 711 Whan they han goon nat fully half a mile, 22362
PardT 712 Right as they wolde han troden over a stile, 22362
PardT 713 An oold man and a povre with hem mette. 22364
PardT 722 A man, though that I walked into Ynde, 22372
PardT 728 Thus walke I, lyk a restelees kaityf, 22378
PardT 763 Under a tree, and there he wole abyde; 22414
PardT 783 To-day that we sholde han so fair a grace? 22434
PardT 815 Hadde I nat doon a freendes torn to thee? " 22466
PardT 820 " And I shal tellen in a wordes fewe 22470
PardT 852 Into the toun, unto a pothecarie, 22502
PardT 855 And eek ther was a polcat in his hawe, 22506
PardT 860 A thyng that, also God my soule save, 22510
PardT 863 Noght but the montance of a corn of whete, 22514
PardT 866 Than thou wolt goon a paas nat but a mile, 22516
PardT 866 Than thou wolt goon a paas nat but a mile, 22516
PardT 869 This poysoun in a box, and sith he ran 22520
PardT 870 Into the nexte strete unto a man, 22520
PardT 932 That ye mowe have a suffisant pardoneer 22582
PardT 937 Looke which a seuretee is it to yow alle 22588
PardT 945 Ye, for a grote! Unbokele anon thy purs. " 22596
PardT 949 And swere it were a relyk of a seint, 22600
PardT 949 And swere it were a relyk of a seint, 22600
PardT 956 This Pardoner answerde nat a word; 22606
ShipT 1 A marchant whilom dwelled at Seint-Denys, 22620
ShipT 3 A wyf he hadde of excellent beautee; 22622
ShipT 5 Which is a thyng that causeth more dispence 22624
ShipT 9 Passen as dooth a shadwe upon the wal; 22628
ShipT 20 This noble marchaunt heeld a worthy hous, 22638
ShipT 25 Ther was a monk, a fair man and a boold -- 22644
ShipT 25 Ther was a monk, a fair man and a boold -- 22644
ShipT 25 Ther was a monk, a fair man and a boold -- 22644
ShipT 26 I trowe a thritty wynter he was oold -- 22644
ShipT 39 For to his herte it was a greet plesaunce. 22658
ShipT 53 But so bifel, this marchant on a day 22672
ShipT 56 To byen there a porcioun of ware; 22674
ShipT 58 A messager, and preyed hath daun John 22676
ShipT 60 With hym and with his wyf a day or tweye, 22678
ShipT 64 By cause he was a man of heigh prudence 22682
ShipT 70 With hym broghte he a jubbe of malvesye, 22688
ShipT 74 This marchant and this monk, a day or tweye. 22692
ShipT 95 A mayde child cam in hire compaignye, 22714
ShipT 101 Fyve houres for to slepe upon a nyght, 22720
ShipT 104 As in a fourme sit a wery hare, 22722
ShipT 104 As in a fourme sit a wery hare, 22722
ShipT 138 Biwreye a word of thyng that ye me telle, 22756
ShipT 143 " Cosyn, " quod she, " if that I hadde a space, 22762
ShipT 145 Thanne wolde I telle a legende of my lyf, 22764
ShipT 146 What I have suffred sith I was a wyf 22764
ShipT 163 But sith I am a wyf, it sit nat me 22782
ShipT 167 A wyf ne shal nat seyn of hir housbonde 22786
ShipT 171 In no degree the value of a flye. 22790
ShipT 180 A Sonday next I moste nedes paye 22798
ShipT 183 Than me were doon a sclaundre or vileynye; 22802
ShipT 190 For at a certeyn day I wol yow paye, 22808
ShipT 197 I have, " quod he, " on yow so greet a routhe 22816
ShipT 209 And forth she gooth as jolif as a pye, 22828
ShipT 223 What, lat us heere a messe, and go we dyne. " 22842
ShipT 234 A pilgrymage, or goon out of the weye. 22852
ShipT 246 That to a thrifty houshold may suffise. 22864
ShipT 251 But hastily a messe was ther seyd, 22870
ShipT 271 An hundred frankes, for a wyke or tweye, 22890
ShipT 273 To stoore with a place that is oures. 22892
ShipT 276 Nat for a thousand frankes, a mile way. 22894
ShipT 276 Nat for a thousand frankes, a mile way. 22894
ShipT 283 Now sikerly this is a smal requeste. 22902
ShipT 289 We may creaunce whil we have a name, 22908
ShipT 297 They drynke, and speke, and rome a while and pleye, 22916
ShipT 305 But as a marchaunt, shortly for to telle, 22924
ShipT 310 In al the hous ther nas so litel a knave, 22928
ShipT 318 In myrthe al nyght a bisy lyf they lede 22936
ShipT 329 That nedes moste he make a chevyssaunce, 22948
ShipT 330 For he was bounden in a reconyssaunce 22948
ShipT 334 A certeyn frankes; and somme with him he ladde. 22952
ShipT 347 Maken a chevyssaunce, as for his beste, 22966
ShipT 369 And hoom he gooth, murie as a papejay, 22988
ShipT 372 A thousand frankes aboven al his costage. 22990
ShipT 383 " By God, " quod he, " I am a litel wrooth 23002
ShipT 386 That ye han maad a manere straungenesse 23004
ShipT 399 I myghte hym axe a thing that he hath payed. " 23018
ShipT 403 I kepe nat of his tokenes never a deel; 23022
ShipT 438 God yeve the monk a thousand last quade yeer! 23056
ShipT 439 A ha! Felawes, beth ware of swich a jape! 23058
ShipT 439 A ha! Felawes, beth ware of swich a jape! 23058
ShipT 446 As curteisly as it had been a mayde, 23064
ShipT 450 A tale next, if so were that ye wolde. 23068
PrT 462 Which that the bar, and is a mayde alway, 23080
PrT 463 To telle a storie I wol do my labour; 23082
PrT 484 But as a child of twelf month oold, or lesse, 23102
PrT 488 Ther was in Asye, in a greet citee, 23106
PrT 489 Amonges Cristene folk a Jewerye, 23108
PrT 490 Sustened by a lord of that contree 23108
PrT 495 A litel scole of Cristen folk ther stood 23114
PrT 502 Among thise children was a wydwes sone, 23120
PrT 503 A litel clergeon, seven yeer of age, 23122
PrT 525 But on a day his felawe gan he preye 23144
PrT 548 Twies a day it passed thurgh his throte, 23166
PrT 561 Is this to yow a thyng that is honest, 23180
PrT 562 That swich a boy shal walken as hym lest 23180
PrT 568 That in an aleye hadde a privee place; 23186
PrT 571 And kitte his throte, and in a pit hym caste. 23190
PrT 572 I seye that in a wardrobe they hym threwe 23190
PrT 584 Biforn this Lamb and synge a song al newe, 23202
PrT 604 Yaf in hir thoght inwith a litel space 23222
PrT 606 Where he was casten in a pit bisyde. 23224
PrT 662 Me thoughte she leyde a greyn upon my tonge. 23280
PrT 681 And in a tombe of marbul stones cleere 23300
PrT 686 For it is but a litel while ago, 23304
Thop 701 This were a popet in an arm t' enbrace 23320
Thop 706 Telle us a tale of myrthe, and that anon. " 23324
Thop 709 But of a rym I lerned longe agoon. " 23328
Thop 715 Al of a knyght was fair and gent 23334
Thop 721 His fader was a man ful free, 23340
Thop 724 Sire Thopas wax a doghty swayn; 23342
Thop 729 He hadde a semely nose. 23348
Thop 735 That coste many a jane. 23354
Thop 739 Therto he was a good archeer; 23358
Thop 742 Ful many a mayde, bright in bour, 23360
Thop 748 And so bifel upon a day, 23366
Thop 752 And in his hand a launcegay, 23370
Thop 753 A long swerd by his side. 23372
Thop 754 He priketh thurgh a fair forest, 23372
Thop 755 Therinne is many a wilde best, 23374
Thop 759 Bitid a sory care. 23378
Thop 762 And many a clowe-gylofre; 23380
Thop 801 That he foond, in a pryve woon, 23420
Thop 807 Til that ther cam a greet geaunt, 23426
Thop 809 A perilous man of dede. 23428
Thop 829 Out of a fel staf-slynge. 23448
Thop 842 With a geaunt with hevedes three, 23460
Thop 852 And mede eek in a mazelyn, 23470
Thop 859 A breech and eek a sherte; 23478
Thop 859 A breech and eek a sherte; 23478
Thop 863 And over that a fyn hawberk, 23482
Thop 867 As whit as is a lilye flour, 23486
Thop 870 And therinne was a bores heed, 23488
Thop 871 A charbocle bisyde; 23490
Thop 888 Loo, lordes myne, heere is a fit! 23506
Thop 906 Upon his creest he bar a tour, 23524
Thop 907 And therinne stiked a lilie flour -- 23526
Thop 909 And for he was a knyght auntrous, 23528
Thop 918 Til on a day -- 23536
Thop 924 Now swich a rym the devel I biteche! 23542
Thop 929 " By God, " quod he, " for pleynly, at a word, 23548
Thop 930 Thy drasty rymyng is nat worth a toord! 23548
Thop 937 I wol yow telle a litel thyng in prose 23556
Thop 940 It is a moral tale vertuous, 23558
Mel 967 A yong man called Melibeus, myghty and riche, bigat upon his wyf, that called was Prudence,23586
Mel 967A a doghter which that called was Sophie. 23586
Mel 968 Upon a day bifel that he for his desport is went into the feeldes hym to pleye.23588
Mel 973A lyk a mad man rentynge his clothes, gan to wepe and crie. 23596
Mel 977 " He is a fool that destourbeth the mooder to wepen in the deeth of hire child23600
Mel 977A til she have wept hir fille as for a certein tyme, 23602
Mel 979A for to wepe and crie as for a certein space, 23606
Mel 980A " Allas, my lord, " quod she, " why make ye youreself for to be lyk a fool?23608
Mel 981 For sothe it aperteneth nat to a wys man to maken swich a sorwe. 23608
Mel 981 For sothe it aperteneth nat to a wys man to maken swich a sorwe. 23608
Mel 986A that hath so greet a cause for to wepe? 23616
Mel 996 He seith eek thus, that sorwe in herte sleeth ful many a man. 23632
Mel 999A and in his body endured and receyved ful many a grevous tribulacion, yet seyde he thus:23638
Mel 1004 Thanne, by the conseil of his wyf Prudence, this Melibeus leet callen a greet congregacion of folk,23648
Mel 1009 And by the manere of his speche it semed that in herte he baar a crueel ire,23654
Mel 1011 A surgien, by licence and assent of swiche as weren wise, up roos 23658
Mel 1016 Almoost right in the same wise the phisiciens answerden, save that they seyden a fewe woordes moore:23668
Mel 1022A is a ful hevy thyng and an heigh matiere, 23676
Mel 1025 for the whiche resouns it were a ful greet peril to erren in this matiere.23682
Mel 1026A in kepynge of thy propre persone in swich a wise 23684
Mel 1031 And eek men seyn that thilke juge is wys that soone understondeth a matiere and juggeth by leyser;23692
Mel 1038 " Lordynges, " quod he, " ther is ful many a man that crieth `Werre, werre!'23708
Mel 1041 For soothly, whan that werre is ones bigonne, ther is ful many a child unborn of his mooder23714
Mel 1045 For Jhesus Syrak seith that " musik in wepynge is a noyous thyng " ; this is to seyn:23720
Mel 1055A for many causes and resouns. For certes, every wight wolde holde me thanne a fool;23738
Mel 1057A For `of a thousand men,' seith Salomon, `I foond o good man, but certes,23742
Mel 1066A to perfourne thilke same emprise by juste cause, men sholde nat seyn therfore that ye were a liere ne forsworn.23760
Mel 1073 And, sire, that ther hath been many a good womman may lightly be preved.23774
Mel 1074 For certes, sire, oure Lord Jhesu Crist wolde nevere have descended to be born of a womman,23776
Mel 1075B appeered rather to a womman than to his Apostles. 23780
Mel 1077A many another man hath founden many a womman ful good and trewe. 23784
Mel 1083 For soothly thilke man that asketh conseil of a purpos, yet hath he free choys23794
Mel 1084A wot noght, as who seith that a womman kan nat hyde that she woot;23798
Mel 1086 of whiche wommen men seyn that thre thynges dryven a man out of his hous --23800
Mel 1087A `it were bettre dwelle in desert than with a womman that is riotous.'23802
Mel 1095A many a womman hath ben ful good, and yet been, and hir conseils ful hoolsome and profitable.23814
Mel 1097 But al be it so that ful many a womman is badde and hir conseil vile and noght worth,23818
Mel 1097A yet han men founde ful many a good womman, and ful discret and wis in conseillynge.23818
Mel 1102 And the same bountee in good conseillyng of many a good womman may men telle.23826
Mel 1104 `It is nat good to been a man alloone; make we to hym an helpe semblable to hymself.'23828
Mel 1107 And ther seyde oones a clerk in two vers, `What is bettre than gold? Jaspre.23832
Mel 1108 And what is better than wisedoom? Womman. And what is bettre than a good womman? Nothyng.'23834
Mel 1131 And trust wel that a coveitous man ne kan noght deme ne thynke, 23866
Mel 1134 ye ne may nat deeme for the beste by a sodeyn thought that falleth in youre herte,23872
Mel 1148 But nathelees, if thou wene sikerly that the biwreiyng of thy conseil to a persone wol make23890
Mel 1158 For Salomon seith that `right as the herte of a man deliteth in savour that is soote,23904
Mel 1160 for certes gold ne silver ben nat so muche worth as the goode wyl of a trewe freend.'23908
Mel 1161 And eek he seith that `a trewe freend is a strong deffense; who so that it fyndeth,23908
Mel 1161A certes he fyndeth a greet tresour.' 23910
Mel 1166 And thanne shul ye kepe this for a general reule: First shul ye clepen to youre conseil23918
Mel 1166A a fewe of youre freendes that been especiale; 23920
Mel 1167 for Salomon seith, `Manye freendes have thou, but among a thousand chese thee oon to be thy conseillour.'23920
Mel 1168 For al be it so that thou first ne telle thy conseil but to a fewe,23922
Mel 1173 First, ye shul eschue the conseillyng of fooles; for Salomon seith, `Taak no conseil of a fool,23930
Mel 1174 The book seith that `the propretee of a fool is this: he troweth lightly harm of every wight,23932
Mel 1178 Salomon seith that `the wordes of a flaterere is a snare to cacche with innocentz.'23940
Mel 1178 Salomon seith that `the wordes of a flaterere is a snare to cacche with innocentz.'23940
Mel 1179A setteth a net biforn his feet to cacche hym.' 23942
Mel 1191 And therfore seith a philosophre in this wise: 23962
Mel 1196 For Cassidorie seith that `it is a manere sleighte to hyndre, 23970
Mel 1212 thanne shaltou considere if thou mayst parfourne it and maken of it a good ende.23994
Mel 1213 For certes resoun wol nat that any man sholde bigynne a thyng 23996
Mel 1214 ne no wight sholde take upon hym so hevy a charge that he myghte nat bere it.23998
Mel 1217 And if so be that thou be in doute wheither thou mayst parfourne a thing or noon,24002
Mel 1218 And Piers Alphonce seith, `If thou hast myght to doon a thyng of which thou most repente,24004
Mel 1220 Thanne may ye understonde by strenger resons that if thou hast power to parfourne a werk24008
Mel 1221 Wel seyn they that defenden every wight to assaye a thyng of which he is in doute24010
Mel 1224 Soothly, a man may chaungen his purpos and his conseil if the cause cesseth,24016
Mel 1224A or whan a newe caas bitydeth. 24016
Mel 1231 " And take this for a general reule, that every conseil that is affermed so strongly that it may nat24024
Mel 1239A be called a conseillyng, but a mocioun or a moevyng of folye, 24038
Mel 1239A be called a conseillyng, but a mocioun or a moevyng of folye, 24038
Mel 1239A be called a conseillyng, but a mocioun or a moevyng of folye, 24038
Mel 1240 in which conseil ye han erred in many a sondry wise. 24040
Mel 1242 For ye sholde first have cleped a fewe folk to youre conseil, and after ye myghte han shewed it24042
Mel 1243 But certes, ye han sodeynly cleped to youre conseil a greet multitude of peple,24044
Mel 1253 whereas in so greet and so heigh a nede it hadde been necessarie mo conseillours24060
Mel 1258 And sith ye woot wel that men shal alwey fynde a gretter nombre of fooles than of wise men,24068
Mel 1280 that right as they han doon me a contrarie, right so sholde I doon hem another.24098
Mel 1307 for ther nys noon so good a phisicien as thy trewe freend.' 24136
Mel 1309 For Piers Alfonce seith, `Ne taak no compaignye by the weye of a straunge man,24138
Mel 1309A but if so be that thou have knowe hym of a lenger tyme. 24140
Mel 1312 and if he bereth a spere, hoold thee on the right syde, 24144
Mel 1312A and if he bere a swerd, hoold thee on the lift syde.' 24144
Mel 1326 And the book seith, `A litel thorn may prikke a kyng ful soore, 24164
Mel 1336A and whan that they been accompliced, yet be they nat worth a stree,24180
Mel 1337 And understoond wel that the gretteste and strongeste garnysoun that a riche man may have,24182
Mel 1339 For thus seith Tullius, that `ther is a manere garnysoun 24184
Mel 1340 a lord to be biloved of his citezeins and of his peple.' 24186
Mel 1360 For Tullius put a thyng which that he clepeth `consentynge'; this is to seyn,24210
Mel 1367 for certes ye ne han no child but a doghter, 24220
Mel 1375 yet nathelees youre kynrede nys but a fer kynrede; they been but litel syb to yow,24230
Mel 1403 For we shul suppose that they shul come to a wikked ende, 24268
Mel 1430 a man wolde nevere take vengeance, and that were harm; 24302
Mel 1435 And yet seye I moore, that right as a singuler persone synneth in takynge vengeance of another man,24306
Mel 1444 " A, " quod Melibee, " this vengeance liketh me no thyng. 24318
Mel 1445A and hath holpen me to passe many a stroong paas. 24320
Mel 1455 For Senec seith, `What man that is norissed by Fortune, she maketh hym a greet fool.'24332
Mel 1463A thou sompnest thyne adversaries to do thee a newe vileynye.' 24344
Mel 1472 they sompne nat a man al oonly for to do newe wronges, but they comanden it.24354
Mel 1473 Also a wys man seith that `the juge that correcteth nat the synnere comandeth and biddeth hym do synne.'24354
Mel 1481 " Forthermoore, ye knowen wel that after the comune sawe, `it is a woodnesse a man to stryve24364
Mel 1481 " Forthermoore, ye knowen wel that after the comune sawe, `it is a woodnesse a man to stryve24364
Mel 1481A with a strenger or a moore myghty man than he is hymself, 24366
Mel 1481A with a strenger or a moore myghty man than he is hymself, 24366
Mel 1482 and for to stryve with a man of evene strengthe -- that is to seyn,24366
Mel 1482A with as strong a man as he is -- it is peril, 24368
Mel 1483 and for to stryve with a weyker man, it is folie.' 24368
Mel 1484 And therfore sholde a man flee stryvynge as muchel as he myghte. 24370
Mel 1485 For Salomon seith, `It is a greet worshipe to a man to kepen hym fro noyse and stryf.'24370
Mel 1485 For Salomon seith, `It is a greet worshipe to a man to kepen hym fro noyse and stryf.'24370
Mel 1486 And if it so bifalle or happe that a man of gretter myght and strengthe24372
Mel 1488A that stryveth with a gretter man than he is hymself.' 24376
Mel 1489 And Catoun seith, `If a man of hyer estaat or degree, or moore myghty than thou,24376
Mel 1497 And Seint Gregorie seith that `whan a man considereth wel the nombre of his defautes and of his synnes,24388
Mel 1503 for he dide nevere synne, ne nevere cam ther a vileyns word out of his mouth.24394
Mel 1509 and the joye that a man seketh to have by pacience in tribulaciouns is perdurable,24402
Mel 1512 For Salomon seith that `the doctrine and the wit of a man is knowen by pacience.'24406
Mel 1517 And therfore seith Seint Jame in his Epistle that `pacience is a greet vertu of perfeccioun.' " 24414
Mel 1518 " Certes, " quod Melibee, " I graunte yow, dame Prudence, that pacience is a greet vertu of perfeccioun;24414
Mel 1522A to do me a vileynye in takynge vengeance upon me, 24420
Mel 1524A though I putte me in a litel peril for to venge me, 24422
Mel 1525 and though I do a greet excesse; that is to seyn, that I venge oon outrage by another. " 24424
Mel 1526 " A, " quod dame Prudence, " ye seyn youre wyl and as yow liketh, 24424
Mel 1527 but in no caas of the world a man sholde nat doon outrage ne excesse for to vengen hym.24426
Mel 1532 And if ye seye that right axeth a man to defenden violence by violence and fightyng by fightyng,24432
Mel 1535 And it bihoveth that a man putte swich attemperance in his deffense24436
Mel 1540 " Certes, " quod Melibee, " I graunte yow that whan a man is inpacient and wrooth of that24444
Mel 1543 For right as he that taketh a straunge hound by the eris is outherwhile biten with the hound,24450
Mel 1554 For right as the body of a man may nat lyven withoute the soule, 24466
Mel 1555 And by richesses may a man gete hym grete freendes. 24468
Mel 1556 And therfore seith Pamphilles: `If a net-herdes doghter,' seith he, `be riche,24468
Mel 1556A she may chesen of a thousand men which she wol take to hir housbonde,24470
Mel 1557 for, of a thousand men, oon wol nat forsaken hire ne refusen hire.'24470
Mel 1558A if thou be right riche -- thou shalt fynde a greet nombre of felawes and freendes.24472
Mel 1563 for greet poverte constreyneth a man to do manye yveles. 24480
Mel 1567 whan a free man by kynde or of burthe is constreyned by poverte 24484
Mel 1568A `sorweful and myshappy is the condicioun of a povre beggere; 24486
Mel 1577 For a man that is to desirynge to gete richesses abaundoneth hym 24498
Mel 1579 He seith also that `the richesse that hastily cometh to a man soone24502
Mel 1579A and lightly gooth and passeth fro a man, 24502
Mel 1585A that may falle unto a man, is so muchel agayns 24510
Mel 1586 nature as a man to encressen his owene profit to the harm of another man.24512
Mel 1589 For Salomon seith that `ydelnesse techeth a man to do manye yveles.'24514
Mel 1593 For ther is a versifiour seith that `the ydel man excuseth hym in wynter by cause24520
Mel 1599 in swich a manere that men holde yow nat to scars, ne to sparynge, ne to fool-large24528
Mel 1599A -- that is to seyen, over-large a spendere. 24530
Mel 1603 in swich a manere that men have no matiere ne cause to calle thee neither wrecche ne chynche,24534
Mel 1604 for it is a greet shame to a man to have a povere herte and a riche purs.'24534
Mel 1604 for it is a greet shame to a man to have a povere herte and a riche purs.'24534
Mel 1604 for it is a greet shame to a man to have a povere herte and a riche purs.'24534
Mel 1604 for it is a greet shame to a man to have a povere herte and a riche purs.'24534
Mel 1611 For a wys man repreveth the avaricious man, and seith thus in two vers:24542
Mel 1612 `Wherto and why burieth a man his goodes by his grete avarice, 24544
Mel 1620 as wel sholde ye kepe yow and governe yow in swich a wise that men calle yow nat fool-large.24554
Mel 1628 For after the word of Salomon, `It is bettre to have a litel good with the love of God24564
Mel 1630 And the prophete seith that `bettre it is to been a good man and have litel good and tresour24566
Mel 1631 than to been holden a shrewe and have grete richesses.' 24566
Mel 1635 And the wise man seith, `The substance of a man is ful good, 24572
Mel 1638 For Salomon seith that `bettre it is and moore it availleth a man to have a good name24576
Mel 1638 For Salomon seith that `bettre it is and moore it availleth a man to have a good name24576
Mel 1641 And certes he sholde nat be called a gentil man that after God and good conscience, alle thynges left,24580
Mel 1642 And Cassidore seith that `it is signe of a gentil herte 24582
Mel 1642A whan a man loveth and desireth to han a good name.' 24584
Mel 1642A whan a man loveth and desireth to han a good name.' 24584
Mel 1647A and rekketh noght though he kepe nat his goode name, nys but a crueel cherl.24590
Mel 1651 And therfore seith a philosophre, `That man that desireth and wole algates han werre, shal nevere have suffisaunce,24596
Mel 1653 And Salomon seith that `the gretter richesses that a man hath, the mo despendours he hath.'24598
Mel 1659 whan he sholde fighte agayn his adversarie that hadde a gretter nombre24606
Mel 1659A and a gretter multitude of folk and strenger than was this peple of Machabee,24606
Mel 1661 `Als lightly,' quod he, `may oure Lord God Almyghty yeve victorie to a fewe folk as to many folk,24608
Mel 1662 for the victorie of a bataile comth nat by the grete nombre of peple,24610
Mel 1669 for as lightly is oon hurt with a spere as another'; 24618
Mel 1670 and for ther is gret peril in werre, therfore sholde a man flee and eschue werre,24620
Mel 1670A in as muchel as a man may goodly. 24620
Mel 1681 " A, " quod Melibee, " now se I wel that ye loven nat myn honour ne my worshipe.24634
Mel 1707 For Salomon seith, `He is moore worth that repreveth or chideth a fool for his folye,24664
Mel 1709A `by the sorweful visage of a man' 24668
Mel 1709B (that is to seyn by the sory and hevy contenaunce of a man) 24668
Mel 1727 thinkinge how she myghte brynge this nede unto a good conclusioun and to a good ende.24688
Mel 1727 thinkinge how she myghte brynge this nede unto a good conclusioun and to a good ende.24688
Mel 1728 And whan she saugh hir tyme, she sente for thise adversaries to come unto hire into a pryvee place24690
Mel 1731 and seyde to hem in a goodly manere hou that hem oughten have greet repentaunce24692
Mel 1735 " A, lady, " quod they, " ye han shewed unto us the blessynge of swetnesse,24698
Mel 1749 that he wole enjoyne us swich a peyne as we mowe nat bere ne susteene.24712
Mel 1753 that a man putte hym al outrely in the arbitracioun and juggement,24718
Mel 1758 by a strenger resoun he deffendeth and forbedeth a man to yeven hymself to his enemy.24726
Mel 1758 by a strenger resoun he deffendeth and forbedeth a man to yeven hymself to his enemy.24726
Mel 1783 For the lawe seith, `Ther nys no thyng so good by wey of kynde as a thyng24756
Mel 1817A of so greet a lord and so worthy as ye been. 24796
Mel 1818A and agilt in swich a wise agayn youre heigh lordshipe 24798
Mel 1829 and assigned hem a certeyn day to retourne unto his court 24810
Mel 1836 " Certes, " quod dame Prudence, " this were a crueel sentence and muchel agayn resoun.24818
Mel 1838 and ye myghte lightly in this wise gete yow a coveitous name, 24820
Mel 1839 which is a vicious thyng, and oghte been eschued of every good man.24822
Mel 1843 And everi man oghte to doon his diligence and his bisynesse to geten hym a good name.24826
Mel 1846 For it is writen that `the olde good loos or good name of a man is soone goon24830
Mel 1860 And Tullius seith, `Ther is no thyng so comendable in a greet lord24846
Mel 1863 in swich a manere that youre goode name may be kept and conserved,24850
Mel 1873A that hym sente a wyf of so greet discrecioun. 24862
MkT 1893 I hadde levere than a barel ale 24884
MkT 1910 To wedden a milksop, or a coward ape, 24900
MkT 1910 To wedden a milksop, or a coward ape, 24900
MkT 1916 Be lik a wilde leoun, fool-hardy. 24906
MkT 1925 For ye shul telle a tale trewely. 24916
MkT 1932 I vowe to God, thou hast a ful fair skyn; 24922
MkT 1933 It is a gentil pasture ther thow goost. 24924
MkT 1934 Thou art nat lyk a penant or a goost: 24924
MkT 1934 Thou art nat lyk a penant or a goost: 24924
MkT 1938 Thou art a maister whan thou art at hoom; 24928
MkT 1940 But a governour, wily and wys, 24930
MkT 1942 A wel farynge persone for the nones. 24932
MkT 1945 Thou woldest han been a tredefowel aright. 24936
MkT 1946 Haddestow as greet a leeve as thou hast myght 24936
MkT 1948 Thou haddest bigeten ful many a creature. 24938
MkT 1949 Allas, why werestow so wyd a cope? 24940
MkT 1950 God yeve me sorwe, but, and I were a pope, 24940
MkT 1953 Sholde have a wyf; for al the world is lorn! 24944
MkT 1964 Ful ofte in game a sooth I have herd seye! " 24954
MkT 1968 To telle yow a tale, or two, or three. 24958
MkT 1973 Tragedie is to seyn a certeyn storie, 24964
MkT 1981 And eek in meetre in many a sondry wyse. 24972
MkT 2000 And nat a man, at hym wol I bigynne. 24990
MkT 2034 For he on every tayl had knyt a brond; 25024
MkT 2037 A thousand men he slow eek with his hond, 25028
MkT 2044 Out of a wang-tooth sprang anon a welle, 25034
MkT 2044 Out of a wang-tooth sprang anon a welle, 25034
MkT 2047 By verray force at Gazan on a nyght, 25038
MkT 2061 But soone shal he wepe many a teere, 25052
MkT 2066 And slepynge in hir barm upon a day, 25056
MkT 2073 But now is he in prison in a cave, 25064
MkT 2080 His foomen made a feeste upon a day, 25070
MkT 2080 His foomen made a feeste upon a day, 25070
MkT 2082 And this was in a temple of greet array. 25072
MkT 2083 But atte laste he made a foul affray, 25074
MkT 2107 And he slow Cacus in a cave of stoon; 25098
MkT 2118 In stide of boundes he a pileer sette. 25108
MkT 2119 A lemman hadde this noble champioun, 25110
MkT 2122 She hath hym sent a sherte, fressh and gay. 25112
MkT 2125 That er that he had wered it half a day 25116
MkT 2142 By swich a wey as he wolde leest suppose. 25132
MkT 2159 This proude kyng leet maken a statue of gold, 25150
MkT 2163 Or in a fourneys, ful of flambes rede, 25154
MkT 2171 And lyk a beest hym semed for to bee, 25162
MkT 2176 His nayles lyk a briddes clawes weere; 25166
MkT 2177 Til God relessed hym a certeyn yeres, 25168
MkT 2178 And yaf hym wit, and thanne with many a teere 25168
MkT 2191 A feeste he made unto his lordes alle 25182
MkT 2192 Upon a tyme and bad hem blithe bee; 25182
MkT 2202 And on a wal this kyng his eyen caste 25192
MkT 2217 And eet hey as a beest in weet and drye 25208
MkT 2241 For whan Fortune wole a man forsake, 25232
MkT 2257 And many a wilde hertes blood she shedde 25248
MkT 2265 And slepen under a bussh, and she koude eke 25256
MkT 2272 To Odenake, a prynce of that contree, 25262
MkT 2282 To have a child, the world to multiplye; 25272
MkT 2298 I seye, so worshipful a creature, 25288
MkT 2314 In the orient, with many a fair citee 25304
MkT 2372 Shal on hir heed now were a vitremyte; 25362
MkT 2374 Shal bere a distaf, hire cost for to quyte. 25364
MkT 2379 And after, at a seege, by subtiltee, 25370
MkT 2390 Broghte this worthy kyng in swich a brike. 25380
MkT 2409 But litel out of Pize stant a tour, 25400
MkT 2414 Swiche briddes for to putte in swich a cage! 25404
MkT 2417 Hadde on hym maad a fals suggestioun, 25408
MkT 2423 And on a day bifil that in that hour 25414
MkT 2427 And in his herte anon ther fil a thoght 25418
MkT 2453 And after that, withinne a day or two, 25444
MkT 2459 Whoso wol here it in a lenger wise, 25450
MkT 2480 The senatours he slow upon a day 25470
MkT 2488 Ne cam, but seyde, " A fair womman was she! " 25478
MkT 2495 In yowthe a maister hadde this emperour 25486
MkT 2509 For which he in a bath made hym to blede 25500
MkT 2513 Which afterward hym thoughte a greet grevaunce; 25504
MkT 2516 Chees in a bath to dye in this manere 25506
MkT 2523 To sette a man that is fulfild of vice 25514
MkT 2527 The peple roos upon hym on a nyght 25518
MkT 2542 And ran into a gardyn hym to hyde. 25532
MkT 2544 That seten by a fyr, greet and reed. 25534
MkT 2550 Of which Fortune lough, and hadde a game. 25540
MkT 2551 Was nevere capitayn under a kyng 25542
MkT 2565 Save in Bethulia, a strong citee, 25556
MkT 2566 Where Eliachim a preest was of that place. 25556
MkT 2569 Withinne his tente, large as is a berne, 25560
MkT 2571 Judith, a womman, as he lay upright 25562
MkT 2604 For many a mannes guttes dide he peyne. 25594
MkT 2613 But in a chayer men aboute hym bar, 25604
MkT 2627 He starf ful wrecchedly in a monteyne. 25618
MkT 2629 That many a man made to wepe and pleyne, 25620
MkT 2659 That evere sholde fallen swich a cas! 25650
MkT 2662 And for thee ne weep she never a teere. 25652
MkT 2687 But now a litel while I wol biwaille 25678
MkT 2690 I seye, oon of his men, a fals traitour, 25680
MkT 2694 That Fortune unto swich a fyn thee broghte! 25684
MkT 2697 But on a tyme Brutus Cassius, 25688
MkT 2704 Upon a day, as he was wont to goon, 25694
MkT 2708 With many a wounde, and thus they lete hym lye; 25698
MkT 2716 And as he lay of diyng in a traunce, 25706
MkT 2731 But swich a reyn doun fro the welkne shadde 25722
MkT 2736 For to bigynne a newe werre agayn. 25726
MkT 2740 And eek a sweven upon a nyght he mette, 25730
MkT 2740 And eek a sweven upon a nyght he mette, 25730
MkT 2743 Upon a tree he was, as that hym thoughte, 25734
MkT 2745 And Phebus eek a fair towaille hym broughte 25736
MkT 2766 And covere hire brighte face with a clowde. 25756
NPT 2771 I seye for me, it is a greet disese, 25762
NPT 2775 As whan a man hath been in povre estaat, 25766
NPT 2782 He spak how Fortune covered with a clowde 25772
NPT 2783 I noot nevere what; and als of a tragedie 25774
NPT 2786 That that is doon, and als it is a peyne, 25776
NPT 2790 Swich talkyng is nat worth a boterflye, 25780
NPT 2801 Whereas a man may have noon audience, 25792
NPT 2812 Be blithe, though thou ryde upon a jade. 25802
NPT 2814 If he wol serve thee, rekke nat a bene. 25804
NPT 2821 A povre wydwe, somdeel stape in age, 25812
NPT 2822 Was whilom dwellyng in a narwe cotage, 25812
NPT 2823 Biside a grove, stondynge in a dale. 25814
NPT 2823 Biside a grove, stondynge in a dale. 25814
NPT 2825 Syn thilke day that she was last a wyf 25816
NPT 2826 In pacience ladde a ful symple lyf, 25816
NPT 2831 Three keen, and eek a sheep that highte Malle. 25822
NPT 2833 In which she eet ful many a sklendre meel. 25824
NPT 2834 Of poynaunt sauce hir neded never a deel. 25824
NPT 2846 For she was, as it were, a maner deye. 25836
NPT 2847 A yeerd she hadde, enclosed al aboute 25838
NPT 2848 With stikkes, and a drye dych withoute, 25838
NPT 2849 In which she hadde a cok, hight Chauntecleer. 25840
NPT 2854 Than is a clokke or an abbey orlogge. 25844
NPT 2860 And batailled as it were a castel wal; 25850
NPT 2877 But swich a joye was it to here hem synge, 25868
NPT 2882 And so bifel that in a dawenynge, 25872
NPT 2891 Ye been a verray sleper; fy, for shame! " 25882
NPT 2899 Withinne our yeerd, wheer as I saugh a beest 25890
NPT 2911 I kan nat love a coward, by my feith! 25902
NPT 2920 Have ye no mannes herte, and han a berd? 25910
NPT 2925 Whan humours been to habundant in a wight. 25916
NPT 2934 Causeth ful many a man in sleep to crie 25924
NPT 2938 That werken many a man sleep ful wo; 25928
NPT 2940 " Lo Catoun, which that was so wys a man, 25930
NPT 2958 And if it do, I dar wel leye a grote, 25948
NPT 2959 That ye shul have a fevere terciane, 25950
NPT 2961 A day or two ye shul have digestyves 25952
NPT 2972 That hath of wysdom swich a greet renoun, 25962
NPT 2975 Of many a man moore of auctorite 25966
NPT 2986 On pilgrimage, in a ful good entente, 25976
NPT 2987 And happed so, they coomen in a toun 25978
NPT 2996 That oon of hem was logged in a stalle, 25986
NPT 2997 Fer in a yeerd, with oxen of the plough; 25988
NPT 3011 Hym thoughte his dreem nas but a vanitee. 26002
NPT 3023 With a ful pitous face, pale of hewe. 26014
NPT 3036 A dong-carte, wente as it were to donge lond, 26026
NPT 3056 Though it abyde a yeer, or two, or thre. 26046
NPT 3068 For certeyn cause, into a fer contree, 26058
NPT 3070 That made hem in a citee for to tarie 26060
NPT 3072 But on a day, agayn the even-tyde, 26062
NPT 3076 But herkneth! To that o man fil a greet mervaille: 26066
NPT 3078 Hym mette a wonder dreem agayn the day. 26068
NPT 3079 Hym thoughte a man stood by his beddes syde, 26070
NPT 3090 I sette nat a straw by thy dremynges, 26080
NPT 3093 And of many a maze therwithal; 26084
NPT 3109 That many a dreem ful soore is for to drede. 26100
NPT 3112 Of Mercenrike, how Kenelm mette a thyng. 26102
NPT 3113 A lite er he was mordred, on a day, 26104
NPT 3113 A lite er he was mordred, on a day, 26104
NPT 3137 May rede of dremes many a wonder thyng. 26128
NPT 3139 Mette he nat that he sat upon a tree, 26130
NPT 3156 I hem diffye, I love hem never a deel! 26146
NPT 3174 And with a chuk he gan hem for to calle, 26164
NPT 3175 For he hadde founde a corn, lay in the yerd. 26166
NPT 3179 He looketh as it were a grym leoun, 26170
NPT 3182 He chukketh whan he hath a corn yfounde, 26172
NPT 3184 Thus roial, as a prince is in his halle, 26174
NPT 3204 But sodeynly hym fil a sorweful cas, 26194
NPT 3207 And if a rethor koude faire endite, 26198
NPT 3208 He in a cronycle saufly myghte it write 26198
NPT 3209 As for a sovereyn notabilitee. 26200
NPT 3215 A col-fox, ful of sly iniquitee, 26206
NPT 3221 And in a bed of wortes stille he lay 26212
NPT 3244 Streyneth me nedely for to doon a thyng -- 26234
NPT 3249 Or if his wityng streyneth never a deel 26240
NPT 3252 My tale is of a cok, as ye may heere, 26242
NPT 3274 Among the wortes on a boterflye, 26264
NPT 3279 For natureelly a beest desireth flee 26270
NPT 3286 Now, certes, I were worse than a feend, 26276
NPT 3291 For trewely, ye have as myrie a stevene 26282
NPT 3313 Among his vers, how that ther was a cok, 26304
NPT 3314 For that a preestes sone yaf hym a knok 26304
NPT 3314 For that a preestes sone yaf hym a knok 26304
NPT 3325 Allas, ye lordes, many a fals flatour 26316
NPT 3326 Is in youre courtes, and many a losengeour, 26316
NPT 3341 And on a Friday fil al this meschaunce. 26332
NPT 3352 For on a Friday, soothly, slayn was he. 26342
NPT 3368 And brende hirselven with a stedefast herte. 26358
NPT 3384 And Malkyn, with a dystaf in hir hand; 26374
NPT 3393 So hydous was the noyse -- a, benedicitee! -- 26384
NPT 3410 A verray pestilence upon yow falle! 26400
NPT 3417 And heighe upon a tree he fleigh anon. 26408
NPT 3438 But ye that holden this tale a folye, 26428
NPT 3439 As of a fox, or of a cok and hen, 26430
NPT 3439 As of a fox, or of a cok and hen, 26430
NPT 3449 This was a murie tale of Chauntecleer. 26440
NPT 3451 Thou woldest ben a trede-foul aright. 26442
NPT 3456 So gret a nekke, and swich a large breest! 26446
NPT 3456 So gret a nekke, and swich a large breest! 26446
NPT 3457 He loketh as a sperhauk with his yen; 26448
SNT 12 Til that a man be hent right by the lappe, 26464
SNT 19 And syn that slouthe hire holdeth in a lees 26472
SNT 95 Is joyned, by a manere conjoynynge 26548
SNT 127 And whan this mayden sholde unto a man 26580
SNT 138 And for his love that dyde upon a tree 26590
SNT 145 Ther is a conseil, and ye wolde it heere, 26598
SNT 165 And if that it a verray angel bee, 26618
SNT 195 Lo, lyk a bisy bee, withouten gile, 26648
SNT 198 Ful lyk a fiers leoun, she sendeth heere, 26650
SNT 202 That hadde a book with lettre of gold in honde, 26654
SNT 235 " I have a brother, " quod Valerian tho, 26688
SNT 285 That alle ydoles nys but a thyng in veyn, 26738
SNT 288 " Whoso that troweth nat this, a beest he is, " 26740
SNT 308 Me thynketh that it were a wonder dede. 26760
SNT 313 Men sholde hym brennen in a fyr so reed 26766
SNT 327 And al that wroght is with a skilful thoght; 26780
SNT 338 Right as a man hath sapiences three -- 26790
SNT 382 Cecile hem seyde with a ful stedefast cheere, 26834
SNT 386 " Ye han for sothe ydoon a greet bataille, 26838
SNT 404 And with his word converted many a wight; 26856
SNT 419 That hath so good a servant hym to serve. 26872
SNT 425 " I am a gentil womman born, " quod she. 26878
SNT 439 But lyk a bladdre ful of wynd, ywys. 26892
SNT 440 For with a nedles poynt, whan it is blowe, 26892
SNT 450 Quod tho Cecile, " and with a wood sentence 26902
SNT 453 For as muche as we doon a reverence 26906
SNT 454 To Crist, and for we bere a Cristen name, 26906
SNT 455 Ye putte on us a cryme and eek a blame. 26908
SNT 455 Ye putte on us a cryme and eek a blame. 26908
SNT 465 To make me a wikked wight? " quod shee. 26918
SNT 477 " And if thou drede nat a sooth to heere, 26930
SNT 479 That thou hast maad a ful gret lesyng heere. 26932
SNT 481 Bothe for to sleen and for to quyken a wight; 26934
SNT 490 For I kan suffre it as a philosophre; 26942
SNT 497 A lewed officer and a veyn justise. 26950
SNT 497 A lewed officer and a veyn justise. 26950
SNT 501 That ilke stoon a god thow wolt it calle. 26954
SNT 505 " It is a shame that the peple shal 26958
SNT 511 For in effect they been nat worth a myte. " 26964
SNT 515 " Brenne hire right in a bath of flambes rede. " 26968
SNT 517 For in a bath they gonne hire faste shetten, 26970
SNT 519 The longe nyght, and eek a day also, 26972
SNT 522 It made hire nat a drope for to sweete. 26974
SNT 546 Heere of myn hous perpetuelly a cherche. " 26998
CYT 557 A man that clothed was in clothes blake, 27010
CYT 558 And undernethe he hadde a whyt surplys. 27010
CYT 565 He was of foom al flekked as a pye. 27018
CYT 566 A male tweyfoold on his croper lay; 27018
CYT 574 His hat heeng at his bak doun by a laas, 27026
CYT 577 A clote-leef he hadde under his hood 27030
CYT 580 His forheed dropped as a stillatorie 27032
CYT 597 Can he oght telle a myrie tale or tweye, 27050
CYT 605 He hath take on hym many a greet emprise, 27058
CYT 613 He is a man of heigh discrecioun; 27066
CYT 614 I warne yow wel, he is a passyng man. " 27066
CYT 616 Is he a clerk, or noon? Telle what he is. " 27068
CYT 617 " Nay, he is gretter than a clerk, ywis, " 27070
CYT 633 His overslope nys nat worth a myte, 27086
CYT 646 Aright, as clerkes seyn; it is a vice. 27098
CYT 648 For whan a man hath over-greet a wit, 27100
CYT 648 For whan a man hath over-greet a wit, 27100
CYT 657 " In the suburbes of a toun, " quod he, 27110
CYT 674 And borwe gold, be it a pound or two, 27126
CYT 677 That of a pound we koude make tweye. 27130
CYT 698 Of al his thretyng rekke nat a myte! " 27150
CYT 703 " A! " quod the Yeman, " heere shal arise game; 27156
CYT 728 Now is it wan and of a leden hewe -- 27180
CYT 748 Thus was I ones lerned of a clerk. 27200
CYT 764 And wel ycovered with a lampe of glas; 27216
CYT 776 Of ech of thise of ounces a certeyn -- 27228
CYT 782 And al the cost, a twenty devel waye, 27234
CYT 787 By cause that I am a lewed man, 27240
CYT 795 And othere swiche, deere ynough a leek -- 27248
CYT 837 Lat hym appiere and wexe a philosophre. 27290
CYT 844 To lerne a lewed man this subtiltee -- 27296
CYT 861 To reyse a feend, al looke he never so rowe. 27314
CYT 862 A! Nay! Lat be; the philosophres stoon, 27314
CYT 878 For unto hem it is a bitter sweete -- 27330
CYT 879 So semeth it -- for nadde they but a sheete 27332
CYT 881 And a brat to walken inne by daylyght, 27334
CYT 886 For al the world they stynken as a goot; 27338
CYT 888 That though a man from hem a mile be, 27340
CYT 888 That though a man from hem a mile be, 27340
CYT 892 And if a man wole aske hem pryvely 27344
CYT 900 Of metals with a certeyn quantitee, 27352
CYT 904 Algate I woot wel he hath swich a name; 27356
CYT 905 And yet ful ofte he renneth in a blame. 27358
CYT 913 Thus han we lost by tymes many a pound -- 27366
CYT 939 And on the floor ycast a canevas, 27392
CYT 940 And al this mullok in a syve ythrowe, 27392
CYT 941 And sifted, and ypiked many a throwe. 27394
CYT 947 A marchant, pardee, may nat ay endure, 27400
CYT 961 Every man semeth a Salomon. 27414
CYT 969 And he that semeth trewest is a theef. 27422
CYT 972 Ther is a chanoun of religioun 27424
CYT 973 Amonges us, wolde infecte al a toun, 27426
CYT 978 Though that he myghte lyve a thousand yeer. 27430
CYT 981 And speke his wordes in so sly a kynde, 27434
CYT 984 But it a feend be, as hymselven is. 27436
CYT 985 Ful many a man hath he bigiled er this, 27438
CYT 986 And wole, if that he lyve may a while; 27438
CYT 987 And yet men ride and goon ful many a mile 27440
CYT 994 Although that my tale of a chanoun bee. 27446
CYT 996 And God forbede that al a compaignye 27448
CYT 1004 Thanne why sholde al the remenant have a blame 27456
CYT 1012 In Londoun was a preest, an annueleer, 27464
CYT 1013 That therinne dwelled hadde many a yeer, 27466
CYT 1022 This false chanon cam upon a day 27474
CYT 1024 Bisechynge hym to lene hym a certeyn 27476
CYT 1026 " Leene me a marc, " quod he, " but dayes three, 27478
CYT 1030 This preest hym took a marc, and that as swithe, 27482
CYT 1037 To lene a man a noble, or two, or thre, 27490
CYT 1037 To lene a man a noble, or two, or thre, 27490
CYT 1041 To swich a man I kan never seye nay. " 27494
CYT 1044 Trouthe is a thyng that I wol evere kepe 27496
CYT 1060 That I wol doon a maistrie er I go. " 27512
CYT 1106 A wonder thyng, which ye saugh nevere er this. " 27558
CYT 1117 And this chanoun took out a crosselet 27570
CYT 1122 In name of Crist, to wexe a philosofre. 27574
CYT 1133 I have a poudre heer, that coste me deere, 27586
CYT 1148 A poudre, noot I wherof that it was 27600
CYT 1150 Or somwhat elles, was nat worth a flye, 27602
CYT 1160 Out of his bosom took a bechen cole, 27612
CYT 1184 " Now lat me medle therwith but a while, 27636
CYT 1187 Have heere a clooth, and wipe awey the wete. " 27640
CYT 1207 Gooth, walketh forth, and bryngeth a chalk stoon; 27660
CYT 1210 And bryngeth eek with yow a bolle or a panne 27662
CYT 1210 And bryngeth eek with yow a bolle or a panne 27662
CYT 1225 A teyne of silver -- yvele moot he cheeve! -- 27678
CYT 1240 He putte his hand in and took up a teyne 27692
CYT 1264 And for a contenaunce in his hand he bar 27716
CYT 1280 But it a fool be, woot wel it moot nede, 27732
CYT 1312 As he dide er -- and al nas but a jape; 27764
CYT 1318 Herde me telle) he hadde a silver teyne. 27770
CYT 1355 I warne yow wel; for save I and a frere, 27808
CYT 1400 A man may lightly lerne, if he have aught, 27852
CYT 1402 Lo! swich a lucre is in this lusty game, 27854
CYT 1403 A mannes myrthe it wol turne unto grame, 27856
CYT 1411 Nevere to thryve were to long a date. 27864
CYT 1415 He is as boold to renne agayn a stoon 27868
CYT 1445 And if he do, he is a lewed man. 27898
CYT 1448 Also ther was a disciple of Plato, 27900
CYT 1449 That on a tyme seyde his maister to, 27902
CYT 1459 " It is a water that is maad, I seye, 27912
CYT 1474 How that a man shal come unto this stoon, 27926
CYT 1480 And there a poynt, for ended is my tale. 27932
MancT 1 Woot ye nat where ther stant a litel toun 27934
MancT 8 A theef myghte hym ful lightly robbe and bynde. 27942
MancT 11 Is that a cook of Londoun, with meschaunce? 27944
MancT 13 For he shal telle a tale, by my fey, 27946
MancT 14 Although it be nat worth a botel hey. 27948
MancT 41 A, taketh heede, sires, of this lusty man. 27974
MancT 45 And that is whan men pleyen with a straw. " 27978
MancT 50 This was a fair chyvachee of a cook! 27984
MancT 50 This was a fair chyvachee of a cook! 27984
MancT 76 " No, " quod the Manciple, " that were a greet mescheef! 28010
MancT 82 And wite ye what? I have heer in a gourde 28016
MancT 83 A draghte of wyn, ye, of a ripe grape, 28016
MancT 83 A draghte of wyn, ye, of a ripe grape, 28016
MancT 84 And right anon ye shul seen a good jape. 28018
MancT 98 T' acord and love, and many a wrong apese. 28032
MancT 110 Slepynge agayn the sonne upon a day; 28044
MancT 114 And syngen that it was a melodie 28048
MancT 129 Was wont to beren in his hand a bowe. 28062
MancT 130 Now hadde this Phebus in his hous a crowe 28064
MancT 131 Which in a cage he fostred many a day, 28064
MancT 131 Which in a cage he fostred many a day, 28064
MancT 132 And taughte it speken, as men teche a jay. 28066
MancT 133 Whit was this crowe as is a snow-whit swan, 28066
MancT 135 He koude, whan he sholde telle a tale. 28068
MancT 139 Now hadde this Phebus in his hous a wyf 28072
MancT 148 A good wyf, that is clene of werk and thoght, 28082
MancT 151 To kepe a shrewe, for it wol nat bee. 28084
MancT 152 This holde I for a verray nycetee, 28086
MancT 161 As to destreyne a thyng which that nature 28094
MancT 162 Hath natureelly set in a creature. 28096
MancT 163 Taak any bryd, and put it in a cage, 28096
MancT 170 Levere in a forest that is rude and coold 28104
MancT 175 Lat take a cat, and fostre hym wel with milk 28108
MancT 177 And lat hym seen a mous go by the wal, 28110
MancT 180 Swich appetit hath he to ete a mous. 28114
MancT 183 A she-wolf hath also a vileyns kynde. 28116
MancT 183 A she-wolf hath also a vileyns kynde. 28116
MancT 186 In tyme whan hir lust to han a make. 28120
MancT 189 For men han evere a likerous appetit 28122
MancT 199 A man of litel reputacioun, 28132
MancT 205 Hir lemman? Certes, this is a knavyssh speche! 28138
MancT 209 If men shal telle proprely a thyng, 28142
MancT 211 I am a boystous man, right thus seye I: 28144
MancT 213 Bitwixe a wyf that is of heigh degree, 28146
MancT 215 And a povre wenche, oother than this -- 28148
MancT 219 And for that oother is a povre womman, 28152
MancT 223 Right so bitwixe a titlelees tiraunt 28156
MancT 224 And an outlawe or a theef erraunt, 28158
MancT 230 Lo, therfore is he cleped a capitayn; 28164
MancT 233 Ne brynge a contree to so greet mescheef, 28166
MancT 234 Men clepen hym an outlawe or a theef. 28168
MancT 235 But for I am a man noght textueel, 28168
MancT 236 I wol noght telle of textes never a deel; 28170
MancT 241 Biheeld hire werk, and seyde never a word. 28174
MancT 246 That to myn herte it was a rejoysynge 28180
MancT 255 The montance of a gnat, so moote I thryve! 28188
MancT 264 His bowe he bente, and sette therinne a flo, 28198
MancT 289 Allas, a thousand folk hath rakel ire 28222
MancT 294 Thou songe whilom lyk a nyghtyngale; 28228
MancT 298 Thus shal men on a traytour been awreke; 28232
MancT 315 Techeth a man to kepen his tonge weel. 28248
MancT 318 " My sone, thenk on the crowe, a Goddes name! 28252
MancT 320 A wikked tonge is worse than a feend; 28254
MancT 320 A wikked tonge is worse than a feend; 28254
MancT 321 My sone, from a feend men may hem blesse. 28254
MancT 323 Walled a tonge with teeth and lippes eke, 28256
MancT 326 Hath many a man been spilt, as clerkes teche, 28260
MancT 339 Wostow wherof a rakel tonge serveth? 28272
MancT 340 Right as a swerd forkutteth and forkerveth 28274
MancT 342 A tonge kutteth freendshipe al a-two. 28276
MancT 343 A jangler is to God abhomynable. 28276
MancT 348 A janglere speke of perilous mateere. 28282
MancT 358 A tale of which he is now yvele apayd. 28292
ParsT 12 As we were entryng at a thropes ende; 28308
ParsT 22 " Sire preest, " quod he, " artow a vicary? 28318
ParsT 23 Or arte a person? Sey sooth, by thy fey! 28318
ParsT 28 Thou sholdest knytte up wel a greet mateere. 28324
ParsT 29 Telle us a fable anon, for cokkes bones! " 28324
ParsT 42 But trusteth wel, I am a Southren man; 28338
ParsT 46 I wol yow telle a myrie tale in prose 28342
ParsT 80 Of whiche weyes ther is a ful noble wey and a ful covenable, which may nat fayle to man ne to womman28376
ParsT 80 Of whiche weyes ther is a ful noble wey and a ful covenable, which may nat fayle to man ne to womman28376
ParsT 86 Penitence, with certeyne circumstances, is verray repentance of a man that halt hymself in sorwe and oother peyne for his giltes.28384
ParsT 89A " He is a japere and a gabbere and no verray repentant that eftsoone dooth thyng for which hym oghte repente. " 28390
ParsT 89A " He is a japere and a gabbere and no verray repentant that eftsoone dooth thyng for which hym oghte repente. " 28390
ParsT 96 The firste is that if a man be baptized after that he hath synned.28400
ParsT 104 Another is, whan a man hath synned openly, of which synne the fame is openly spoken in the contree,28410
ParsT 109 For which seith Seint John Crisostom, " Penitence destreyneth a man to accepte benygnely every peyne that hym is enjoyned,28416
ParsT 112 And agayns thise wikkede giltes is Penitence, that may be likned unto a tree.28420
ParsT 113A right as the roote of a tree hydeth hym in the erthe. 28422
ParsT 114 Of the roote of Contricioun spryngeth a stalke that bereth braunches and leves of Confessioun, and fruyt of Satisfaccioun.28424
ParsT 117 Of this roote eek spryngeth a seed of grace, the which seed is mooder of sikernesse, and this seed is egre and hoot.28428
ParsT 121 This heete draweth the herte of a man to God and dooth hym haten his synne.28432
ParsT 122 For soothly ther is nothyng that savoureth so wel to a child as the milk of his norice,28432
ParsT 128A and whiche been the causes that moeven a man to Contricioun, and how he sholde be contrit, and what Contricioun availleth to the soule.28444
ParsT 129 Thanne is it thus: that Contricioun is the verray sorwe that a man receyveth in his herte for his synnes,28444
ParsT 133 The causes that oghte moeve a man to Contricioun been sixe. First a man shal remembre hym of his synnes;28452
ParsT 133 The causes that oghte moeve a man to Contricioun been sixe. First a man shal remembre hym of his synnes;28452
ParsT 139A for which ye be roten in youre synne, as a beest in his dong. 28462
ParsT 140 Swiche manere of thoghtes maken a man to have shame of his synne, and no delit, as God seith by the prophete Ezechiel,28462
ParsT 142 The seconde cause that oghte make a man to have desdeyn of synne is this:28464
ParsT 142A that, as seith Seint Peter, " whoso that dooth synne is thral of synne " ; and synne put a man in greet thraldom.28466
ParsT 143A Certes, wel oghte a man have desdayn of synne and withdrawe hym from that thraldom and vileynye.28468
ParsT 145A or than for to maken of my body a thral. " 28472
ParsT 146 Ne a fouler thral may no man ne womman maken of his body than for to yeven his body to synne.28472
ParsT 156 " Likneth a fair womman that is a fool of hire body 28486
ParsT 156 " Likneth a fair womman that is a fool of hire body 28486
ParsT 156A lyk to a ryng of gold that were in the groyn of a soughe. " 28486
ParsT 156A lyk to a ryng of gold that were in the groyn of a soughe. " 28486
ParsT 157 For right as a soughe wroteth in everich ordure, so wroteth she hire beautee in the stynkynge ordure of synne.28488
ParsT 158 The thridde cause that oghte moeve a man to Contricioun is drede of the day of doom and of the horrible peynes of helle.28488
ParsT 162 O goode God, muchel oghte a man to drede swich a juggement, " ther as we shullen been alle, " 28492
ParsT 162 O goode God, muchel oghte a man to drede swich a juggement, " ther as we shullen been alle, " 28492
ParsT 163 whereas he shal make a general congregacioun, whereas no man may been absent.28494
ParsT 167 Ther shul we han a juge that may nat been deceyved ne corrupt. And why?28498
ParsT 176 And therfore seith Job to God, " Suffre, Lord, that I may a while biwaille and wepe,28512
ParsT 178 Loo, heere may ye seen that Job preyde respit a while to biwepe and waille his trespas,28516
ParsT 179 And forasmuche as a man may acquiten hymself biforn God by penitence in this world, and nat by tresor,28518
ParsT 179A therfore sholde he preye to God to yeve hym respit a while to biwepe and biwaillen his trespas.28520
ParsT 180 For certes, al the sorwe that a man myghte make fro the bigynnyng of the world28520
ParsT 180A nys but a litel thyng at regard of the sorwe of helle. 28522
ParsT 185A right as dooth a derk clowde bitwixe us and the sonne. 28530
ParsT 188A For certes, namoore reverence shal be doon there to a kyng than to a knave.28536
ParsT 188A For certes, namoore reverence shal be doon there to a kyng than to a knave.28536
ParsT 212 Certes, a shadwe hath the liknesse of the thyng of which it is shadwe,28576
ParsT 230 " Thilke science, " as seith Seint Augustyn, " maketh a man to waymenten in his herte. " 28604
ParsT 231 The fourthe point that oghte maken a man to have contricion is the sorweful remembraunce of the good28606
ParsT 245 and eek they availlen for to usen a man to doon goode werkes, that the feend have the lasse power of his soule.28630
ParsT 249 For certes, synne bireveth a man bothe goodnesse of nature and eek the goodnesse of grace.28636
ParsT 254 [in] so muche that ther shal nat perisse an heer of his heed, ne a moment of an houre28644
ParsT 254A ne shal nat perisse of his tyme, that he ne shal yeve of it a rekenyng. " 28644
ParsT 255 The fifthe thyng that oghte moeve a man to contricioun 28646
ParsT 283 The sixte thyng that oghte moeve a man to contricioun is the hope of three thynges; that is to seyn, foryifnesse of synne,28690
ParsT 287A that is yeve to any man, by which a man may be saved, but oonly Jhesus. " 28696
ParsT 288 Nazarenus is as muche for to seye as " florisshynge, " in which a man shal hope that28698
ParsT 292 Now shal a man understonde in which manere shal been his contricioun. I seye that it shal been universal and total.28704
ParsT 292A This is to seyn, a man shal be verray repentaunt for alle his synnes that he hath doon28706
ParsT 293A whan a man is moeved to do synne, and deliteth hym longe for to thynke on that synne;28708
ParsT 296 And also a man sholde sorwe namely for al that evere he hath desired agayn the lawe of God28714
ParsT 300A For certes, the repentaunce of a synguler synne, and nat repente of alle his othere synnes,28722
ParsT 300B or elles repenten hym of alle his othere synnes and nat of a synguler synne, may nat availle.28722
ParsT 308A wherof avayleth contricioun. I seye that somtyme contricioun delivereth a man fro synne;28736
ParsT 315A if he ne hadde pitee of mannes soule, a sory song we myghten alle synge.28750
ParsT 322 Of the spryngynge of synnes seith Seint Paul in this wise: that " Right as by a man synne entred first into this world,28758
ParsT 330 And whan that they knewe that they were naked, they sowed of fige leves a maner of breches to hiden hire membres.28774
ParsT 339 Therfore, al the while that a man hath in hym the peyne of concupiscence,28792
ParsT 342A they been so contrarie and so stryven that a man may nat alway doon as he wolde. " 28800
ParsT 352 And after that, a man bithynketh hym wheither he wol doon or no thilke thing to which he is tempted.28818
ParsT 353 And thanne, if that a man withstonde and weyve the firste entisynge of his flessh and of the feend,28818
ParsT 353A thanne is it no synne; and if it so be that he do nat so, thanne feeleth he anoon a flambe of delit.28820
ParsT 356 for certes, right as a swerd departeth a thyng in two peces, right so consentynge departeth God fro man --28826
ParsT 356 for certes, right as a swerd departeth a thyng in two peces, right so consentynge departeth God fro man --28826
ParsT 357 For certes, thanne is a man al deed in soule. 28828
ParsT 360 And therfore, if a man charge hymself with manye swiche venial synnes,28836
ParsT 361 and in this wise skippeth venial into deedly synne. For certes, the moore that a man chargeth his soule with venial synnes,28838
ParsT 362 And therfore lat us nat be necligent to deschargen us of venial synnes. For the proverbe seith that " Manye smale maken a greet. " 28840
ParsT 363 And herkne this ensample. A greet wawe of the see comth som tyme with so greet a violence that it drencheth the ship.28842
ParsT 363 And herkne this ensample. A greet wawe of the see comth som tyme with so greet a violence that it drencheth the ship.28842
ParsT 363A And the same harm doon som tyme the smale dropes of water, that entren thurgh a litel crevace into the thurrok,28842
ParsT 364 And therfore, although ther be a difference bitwixe thise two causes of drenchynge, algates the ship is dreynt.28844
ParsT 365A whan they multiplie in a man so greetly that [the love of] thilke worldly thynges that he loveth,28846
ParsT 366A although that a man love it lasse than God, yet is it venial synne;28850
ParsT 368 " Deedly synne, " as seith Seint Augustyn, " is whan a man turneth his herte fro God,28852
ParsT 369A For sooth is that if a man yeve his love, the which that he oweth al to God with al his herte, unto a creature,28854
ParsT 369A For sooth is that if a man yeve his love, the which that he oweth al to God with al his herte, unto a creature,28854
ParsT 371A a man peraventure ne demeth hem nat synnes, and ne shryveth him nat of the same thynges, and yet natheless they been synnes28860
ParsT 372 soothly, as thise clerkes writen; this is to seyn, that at every tyme that a man eteth or drynketh28860
ParsT 378 eke if he tale vanytees at chirche or at Goddes service, or that he be a talker28872
ParsT 383 For, as seith Seint Augustyn, " If a man love God in swich manere that al that evere he dooth28882
ParsT 384 looke how muche that a drope of water that falleth in a fourneys ful of fyr anoyeth28884
ParsT 384 looke how muche that a drope of water that falleth in a fourneys ful of fyr anoyeth28884
ParsT 384A or greveth, so muche anoyeth a venial synne unto a man that is parfit in the love of Jhesu Crist. " 28884
ParsT 384A or greveth, so muche anoyeth a venial synne unto a man that is parfit in the love of Jhesu Crist. " 28884
ParsT 390A yet wol I shewe a partie of hem, as ye shul understonde. 28896
ParsT 398 Swellynge of herte is whan a man rejoyseth hym of harm that he hath doon.28906
ParsT 403 Presumpcioun is whan a man undertaketh an emprise that hym oghte nat do, or elles that he may nat do;28912
ParsT 406 Janglynge is whan a man speketh to muche biforn folk, and clappeth as a mille, and taketh no keep what he seith.28916
ParsT 406 Janglynge is whan a man speketh to muche biforn folk, and clappeth as a mille, and taketh no keep what he seith.28916
ParsT 407 And yet is ther a privee spece of Pride that waiteth first to be salewed28918
ParsT 408A and his entente in swich a proud desir to be magnified and honoured biforn the peple.28922
ParsT 424 and eek the buttokes of hem faren as it were the hyndre part of a she-ape in the fulle of the moone.28950
ParsT 433 and also in many a vicious knave that is sustened by cause of hem; and in to curious harneys,28966
ParsT 446 And eek in to greet preciousnesse of vessel and curiositee of mynstralcie, by whiche a man is stired the moore to delices of luxurie,28988
ParsT 447 if so be that he sette his herte the lasse upon oure Lord Jhesu Crist, certeyn it is a synne;28990
ParsT 456 Of whiche forseyde goodes, certes it is a ful greet folye a man to priden hym in any of hem alle.29002
ParsT 456 Of whiche forseyde goodes, certes it is a ful greet folye a man to priden hym in any of hem alle.29002
ParsT 458B For, God woot, the flessh is a ful greet enemy to the soule, 29008
ParsT 460 And over al this, strengthe of body and worldly hardynesse causeth ful ofte many a man to peril and meschaunce.29012
ParsT 463 For truste wel that over what man that synne hath maistrie, he is a verray cherl to synne.29018
ParsT 467A " Ther is no thing moore covenable to a man of heigh estaat than debonairetee and pitee.29024
ParsT 469 Another is, a man to have a noble herte and a diligent to attayne to heighe vertuouse thynges.29026
ParsT 469 Another is, a man to have a noble herte and a diligent to attayne to heighe vertuouse thynges.29026
ParsT 469 Another is, a man to have a noble herte and a diligent to attayne to heighe vertuouse thynges.29026
ParsT 470 Now certes, a man to pride hym in the goodes of grace is eek an outrageous folie, for thilke29028
ParsT 471 Certes also, whoso prideth hym in the goodes of fortune, he is a ful greet fool;29030
ParsT 471A for somtyme is a man a greet lord by the morwe, that is a caytyf and a wrecche er it be nyght;29030
ParsT 471A for somtyme is a man a greet lord by the morwe, that is a caytyf and a wrecche er it be nyght;29030
ParsT 471A for somtyme is a man a greet lord by the morwe, that is a caytyf and a wrecche er it be nyght;29030
ParsT 471A for somtyme is a man a greet lord by the morwe, that is a caytyf and a wrecche er it be nyght;29030
ParsT 472 and somtyme the richesse of a man is cause of his deth; 29032
ParsT 472A somtyme the delices of a man ben cause of the grevous maladye thurgh which he dyeth.29032
ParsT 474 God woot, desir to have commendacioun eek of the peple hath caused deeth to many a bisy man.29034
ParsT 477 That is a vertu thurgh which a man hath verray knoweleche of hymself, and holdeth of hymself no pris ne deyntee,29038
ParsT 477 That is a vertu thurgh which a man hath verray knoweleche of hymself, and holdeth of hymself no pris ne deyntee,29038
ParsT 479 The humilitee in herte is in foure maneres. That oon is whan a man holdeth hymself as noght worth biforn God of hevene.29042
ParsT 483A or of hym that is in hyer degree. Certein, this is a greet werk of humylitee.29052
ParsT 487 That oother spece of malice is whan a man werreyeth trouthe, whan he woot that it is trouthe;29062
ParsT 491A and prosperitee is kyndely matere of joye; thanne is Envye a synne agayns kynde.29070
ParsT 493A Som man preiseth his neighebor by a wikked entente, 29074
ParsT 494 for he maketh alwey a wikked knotte atte laste ende. Alwey he maketh a " but " atte laste ende,29074
ParsT 494 for he maketh alwey a wikked knotte atte laste ende. Alwey he maketh a " but " atte laste ende,29074
ParsT 495 The seconde spece is that if a man be good and dooth or seith a thing to good entente,29076
ParsT 495 The seconde spece is that if a man be good and dooth or seith a thing to good entente,29076
ParsT 497 The fourthe spece of bakbityng is this: that if men speke goodnesse of a man, thanne wol the bakbitere seyn,29080
ParsT 497A " Parfey, swich a man is yet bet than he, " in dispreisynge of hym that men preise.29080
ParsT 500 Agayn God it is whan a man gruccheth agayn the peyne of helle, or agayns poverte, or los of catel,29084
ParsT 505 And somtyme grucchyng sourdeth of Envye, whan men discovereth a mannes harm that was pryvee or29092
ParsT 508A but that lewed folk yeven it swich a name. 29098
ParsT 513 Thanne comth malignitee, thurgh which a man anoyeth his neighebor prively, if he may;29104
ParsT 533A anon he wole comunly fynde hym a matere of wratthe, in word or in dede, agayns hym to whom he hath envye.29140
ParsT 539A thurgh which a man is wrooth with wikkednesse and agayns wikkednesse; and therfore seith a wys man that Ire is bet than pley.29148
ParsT 539A thurgh which a man is wrooth with wikkednesse and agayns wikkednesse; and therfore seith a wys man that Ire is bet than pley.29148
ParsT 542 The menyng and the sens of this is that the resoun of a man ne consente nat to thilke sodeyn Ire,29154
ParsT 546 This Ire is a ful greet plesaunce to the devel, 29160
ParsT 551 Ther is a maner tree, as seith Seint Ysidre, that whan men maken fir of thilke tree29170
ParsT 551A and covere the coles of it with asshen, soothly the fir of it wol lasten al a yeer or moore.29170
ParsT 555 thanne stant Envye and holdeth the hoote iren upon the herte of man with a peire of longe toonges of long rancour;29176
ParsT 560 Is nat this a cursed vice? Yis, certes. Allas! It bynymeth from man his wit and his resoun,29182
ParsT 562A discord, thurgh which a man forsaketh his olde freend that he hath loved ful longe;29188
ParsT 570A as whan thou comandest to sleen a man or elles yevest hym conseil to sleen a man.29200
ParsT 570A as whan thou comandest to sleen a man or elles yevest hym conseil to sleen a man.29200
ParsT 571A That oon is by lawe, right as a justice dampneth hym that is coupable to the deeth.29202
ParsT 574 Eek if a man, by caas or aventure, shete an arwe, 29210
ParsT 574A or caste a stoon with which he sleeth a man, he is homycide. 29210
ParsT 574A or caste a stoon with which he sleeth a man, he is homycide. 29210
ParsT 575 Eek if a womman by necligence overlyeth hire child in hir slepyng, it is homycide and deedly synne.29212
ParsT 576 Eek whan man destourbeth concepcioun of a child, and maketh a womman outher bareyne29212
ParsT 576 Eek whan man destourbeth concepcioun of a child, and maketh a womman outher bareyne29212
ParsT 576B or sleeth a child by drynkes wilfully, or elles putteth certeine material thynges in hire secree places to slee the child,29214
ParsT 577A ther as a child may nat be conceived, or elles if a woman have conceyved,29216
ParsT 577A ther as a child may nat be conceived, or elles if a woman have conceyved,29216
ParsT 579 Homycide is eek if a man approcheth to a womman by desir of lecherie, thurgh which the child is perissed,29220
ParsT 579 Homycide is eek if a man approcheth to a womman by desir of lecherie, thurgh which the child is perissed,29220
ParsT 579A or elles smyteth a womman wityngly, thurgh which she leseth hir child. Alle thise been homycides and horrible deedly synnes.29220
ParsT 583 Thanne comth of Ire attry angre. Whan a man is sharply amonested in his shrifte to forleten his synne,29228
ParsT 585A or elles it is his destinee, as he seith, unto a certein 29232
ParsT 589A ne by erthe, for it is the bench of his feet; ne by Jerusalem, for it is the citee of a greet kyng;29240
ParsT 596A or elles taketh on hym the name of Crist, to be called a Cristen man29256
ParsT 601A and holden it a gentrie or a manly dede to swere grete othes? 29266
ParsT 601A and holden it a gentrie or a manly dede to swere grete othes? 29266
ParsT 601B And what of hem that of verray usage ne cesse nat to swere grete othes, al be the cause nat worth a straw?29268
ParsT 602 Swerynge sodeynly withoute avysement is eek a synne. 29270
ParsT 603B or in a bright swerd, in a cercle, or in a fir, or in a shulder-boon of a sheep.29272
ParsT 603B or in a bright swerd, in a cercle, or in a fir, or in a shulder-boon of a sheep.29272
ParsT 603B or in a bright swerd, in a cercle, or in a fir, or in a shulder-boon of a sheep.29272
ParsT 603B or in a bright swerd, in a cercle, or in a fir, or in a shulder-boon of a sheep.29272
ParsT 603B or in a bright swerd, in a cercle, or in a fir, or in a shulder-boon of a sheep.29272
ParsT 610A lesynge comth of delit for to lye, in which delit they wol forge a long tale29284
ParsT 614A for he dredeth detraccion; but certes flaterye, that maketh a man to enhauncen his herte and his contenaunce.29290
ParsT 615 Flatereres been the develes enchauntours; for they make a man to wene of hymself be lyk that he nys nat lyk.29292
ParsT 616 They been lyk to Judas that bitraysen a man to sellen hym to his enemy; that is to the devel.29292
ParsT 620 And ofte tyme swich cursynge wrongfully retorneth agayn to hym that curseth, as a bryd that retorneth agayn to his owene nest.29298
ParsT 623 For certes, unnethes may a man pleynly been accorded with hym that hath hym openly revyled and repreved and disclaundred.29304
ParsT 623A This is a ful grisly synne, as Crist seith in the gospel. 29304
ParsT 627 And certes, chidynge may nat come but out of a vileyns herte. 29312
ParsT 629A and soothly, a deslavee tonge sleeth the spirites of hym that repreveth and eek of hym that is repreved.29318
ParsT 631 And how that chidynge be a vileyns thyng bitwixe alle manere folk,29322
ParsT 631A yet is it certes moost uncovenable bitwixe a man and his wyf, 29322
ParsT 631C hous that is uncovered and droppynge and a chidynge wyf been lyke. " 29324
ParsT 632 A man that is in a droppynge hous in manye places, 29326
ParsT 632 A man that is in a droppynge hous in manye places, 29326
ParsT 632B So fareth it by a chydynge wyf; but she chide hym in o place, she wol chide hym in another.29328
ParsT 633 And therfore, " Bettre is a morsel of breed with joye than an hous ful of delices with chidynge, " seith Salomon.29328
ParsT 635 Afterward speke we of scornynge, which is a wikked synne, and namely whan he scorneth a man for his goode werkes.29332
ParsT 635 Afterward speke we of scornynge, which is a wikked synne, and namely whan he scorneth a man for his goode werkes.29332
ParsT 639 Speke we now of wikked conseil, for he that wikked conseil yeveth is a traytour.29336
ParsT 642 Now comth the synne of hem that sowen and maken discord amonges folk, which is a synne that Crist hateth outrely.29342
ParsT 645 Now comth biwreying of conseil, thurgh which a man is defamed; certes, unnethe may he restoore the damage.29350
ParsT 649 Now comth janglynge, that may nat been withoute synne. And, as seith Salomon, " It is a sygne of apert folye. " 29356
ParsT 650 And therfore a philosophre seyde, whan men axed hym how that men sholde plese the peple,29356
ParsT 654 The remedie agayns Ire is a vertu that men clepen mansuetude, that is debonairetee;29364
ParsT 658A " A man is a quyk thyng, by nature debonaire and tretable to goodnesse;29372
ParsT 658A " A man is a quyk thyng, by nature debonaire and tretable to goodnesse;29372
ParsT 659 Pacience, that is another remedie agayns Ire, is a vertu that suffreth swetely every mannes goodnesse,29374
ParsT 661 This vertu maketh a man lyk to God, and maketh hym Goddes owene deere child, as seith Crist.29378
ParsT 664 Suffre thou therfore paciently; for the wise man seith, " If thou stryve with a fool,29384
ParsT 666 The thridde grevance is a man to have harm in his body. That suffred Crist ful paciently in al his passioun.29388
ParsT 670 A philosophre upon a tyme, that wolde have beten his disciple for his grete trespas,29396
ParsT 670 A philosophre upon a tyme, that wolde have beten his disciple for his grete trespas,29396
ParsT 670A for which he was greetly amoeved, and broghte a yerde to scoure with the child;29398
ParsT 672A that han lost al youre pacience for the gilt of a child. " 29402
ParsT 674 Of pacience comth obedience, thurgh which a man is obedient to Crist and to alle hem29404
ParsT 675A whan that a man dooth gladly and hastily, with good herte entierly, al that he sholde do.29406
ParsT 677A For Envye blyndeth the herte of a man, and Ire troubleth a man, and Accidie maketh hym hevy, thoghtful, and wraw.29410
ParsT 677A For Envye blyndeth the herte of a man, and Ire troubleth a man, and Accidie maketh hym hevy, thoghtful, and wraw.29410
ParsT 679 Certes, this is a dampnable synne, for it dooth wrong to Jhesu Crist,29412
ParsT 685 Now certes this foule synne Accidie is eek a ful greet enemy to the liflode of the body,29424
ParsT 687 Of Accidie comth first that a man is anoyed and encombred for to doon any goodnesse,29428
ParsT 690 Usage of labour is a greet thyng, for it maketh, as seith Seint Bernard, the laborer to have stronge armes and harde synwes;29434
ParsT 700 Allas, kan a man nat bithynke hym on the gospel of Seint Luc, 15,29450
ParsT 700A where as Crist seith that " as wel shal ther be joye in hevene upon a synful man that dooth penitence,29452
ParsT 706 Thanne cometh sompnolence, that is sloggy slombrynge, which maketh a man be hevy and dul in body and in soule,29462
ParsT 708 For soothly, the morwe tyde is moost covenable a man to seye his preyeres, and for to thynken on God,29466
ParsT 711 Necligence ne dooth no fors, whan he shal doon a thyng, wheither he do it weel or baddely.29470
ParsT 714 Thanne comth ydelnesse, that is the yate of alle harmes. An ydel man is lyk to a place that hath no walles;29476
ParsT 718 Thanne comth the synne that men clepen tarditas, as whan a man is to laterede or tariynge er he wole turne to God,29482
ParsT 718A and certes that is a greet folie. He is lyk to hym that falleth in the dych and wol nat arise.29484
ParsT 719 And this vice comth of a fals hope, that he thynketh that he shal lyve longe; but that hope faileth ful ofte.29484
ParsT 722A Thanne comth a manere cooldnesse, that freseth al the herte of a man.29492
ParsT 722A Thanne comth a manere cooldnesse, that freseth al the herte of a man.29492
ParsT 723 Thanne comth undevocioun, thurgh which a man is so blent, as seith Seint Bernard,29492
ParsT 726A for therof comth that a man is anoyed of his owene lif. 29498
ParsT 728 Agayns this horrible synne of Accidie, and the branches of the same, ther is a vertu that is called fortitudo or strengthe,29500
ParsT 728A that is an affeccioun thurgh which a man despiseth anoyouse thinges.29502
ParsT 733 And for as muchel as the devel fighteth agayns a man moore by queyntise and by sleighte than by strengthe,29510
ParsT 735A whan a man ne douteth no travaille in tyme comynge of the goode werkes that a man hath bigonne.29516
ParsT 735A whan a man ne douteth no travaille in tyme comynge of the goode werkes that a man hath bigonne.29516
ParsT 736 Thanne comth magnificence; that is to seyn, whan a man dooth and parfourneth grete werkes of goodnesse; and that is the ende29516
ParsT 740 For soothly, whan the herte of a man is confounded in itself and troubled, and that29526
ParsT 741 Avarice, after the descripcioun of Seint Augustyn, is a likerousnesse in herte to have erthely thynges.29528
ParsT 745 Soothly, this Avarice is a synne that is ful dampnable, for al hooly writ curseth it and speketh agayns that vice,29534
ParsT 753A for as muche as a cherl hath no temporeel thyng that it ne is his lordes, as they seyn.29550
ParsT 763 Every synful man is a cherl to synne. I rede thee, certes, that thou, lord,29566
ParsT 767A Certes, the swerd that men yeven first to a knyght, whan he is newe dubbed, signifieth that he sholde deffenden hooly chirche,29576
ParsT 778A that, there as God hath ordeyned that a regne or a contree is suffisaunt to hymself,29600
ParsT 778A that, there as God hath ordeyned that a regne or a contree is suffisaunt to hymself,29600
ParsT 782 This desir, if so be that a man do his diligence to parfournen it,29606
ParsT 782A al be it that his desir ne take noon effect, yet is it to hym a deedly synne;29608
ParsT 806 Thanne is misericorde, as seith the Philosophre, a vertu 29652
ParsT 806A by which the corage of a man is stired by the mysese of hym that is mysesed.29654
ParsT 808 And certes, thise thynges moeven a man to the misericorde of Jhesu Crist,29656
ParsT 822A and therfore, whan a man is dronken, he hath lost his resoun; and this is deedly synne.29684
ParsT 823 But soothly, whan that a man is nat wont to strong drynke, and peraventure ne knoweth nat the strengthe of the drynke,29686
ParsT 824 The seconde spece of glotonye is that the spirit of a man wexeth al trouble,29688
ParsT 825 The thridde spece of glotonye is whan a man devoureth his mete and hath no rightful manere of etynge.29690
ParsT 827A a man foryeteth er the morwe what he dide at even, or on the nyght biforn.29694
ParsT 828A The seconde is whan a man get hym to delicaat mete or drynke. 29696
ParsT 832 " Abstinence, " he seith, " is litel worth but if a man have good wil therto,29702
ParsT 838A and if she were a gentil womman, she sholde be slayn with 29714
ParsT 838B stones; and if she were a bisshoppes doghter, she sholde been brent, by Goddes comandement.29714
ParsT 841 Seint John seith that avowtiers shullen been in helle, in a stank brennynge of fyr and of brymston29720
ParsT 842B " A man shal lete fader and mooder and taken hym to his wif, and they shullen be two in o flessh. " 29724
ParsT 845A " whoso seeth a womman to coveitise of his lust, he hath doon lecherie with hire in his herte. " 29728
ParsT 849 And certes, if it be a foul thyng a man to waste his catel on wommen,29734
ParsT 849 And certes, if it be a foul thyng a man to waste his catel on wommen,29734
ParsT 849A yet is it a fouler thyng whan that, for swich ordure, wommen dispenden upon men hir catel and substaunce.29734
ParsT 851 And right as a marchant deliteth hym moost in chaffare that he hath moost avantage of,29738
ParsT 854A And therfore seith Salomon that " whoso toucheth and handleth a womman, he fareth lyk29744
ParsT 856 The fourthe fynger is the kissynge; and trewely he were a greet fool29746
ParsT 856A that wolde kisse the mouth of a brennynge oven or of a fourneys.29748
ParsT 856A that wolde kisse the mouth of a brennynge oven or of a fourneys.29748
ParsT 858A though he may nat pisse, yet wole he heve up his leg and make a contenaunce to pisse.29752
ParsT 859A certes, that opinion is fals. God woot, a man may sleen hymself with his owene knyf,29754
ParsT 863 Certes, the fyve fyngres of Glotonie the feend put in the wombe of a man,29760
ParsT 867 Parfay, the resoun of a man telleth eek hym wel that it is deedly synne, for as muche as God forbad leccherie.29766
ParsT 868 Another synne of Leccherie is to bireve a mayden of hir maydenhede, for he that so dooth,29768
ParsT 868A certes, he casteth a mayden out of the hyeste degree that is in this present lif29770
ParsT 877 This synne is eek a thefte, for thefte generally is for to reve a wight his thyng agayns his wille.29784
ParsT 877 This synne is eek a thefte, for thefte generally is for to reve a wight his thyng agayns his wille.29784
ParsT 878 Certes, this is the fouleste thefte that may be, whan a womman steleth hir body from hir housbonde29786
ParsT 879 This is a fouler thefte than for to breke a chirche and stele the chalice,29788
ParsT 879 This is a fouler thefte than for to breke a chirche and stele the chalice,29788
ParsT 885A bordels of thise fool wommen, that mowe be likned to a commune gong, where as men purgen hire ordure.29802
ParsT 886 What seye we eek of putours that lyven by the horrible synne of putrie, and constreyne wommen to yelden hem a certeyn rente29802
ParsT 898A namoore than hath a free bole that taketh which cow that hym liketh in the town.29830
ParsT 899 So faren they by wommen. For right as a free bole is ynough for al a toun,29832
ParsT 899 So faren they by wommen. For right as a free bole is ynough for al a toun,29832
ParsT 899A right so is a wikked preest corrupcioun ynough for al a parisshe, or for al a contree.29832
ParsT 899A right so is a wikked preest corrupcioun ynough for al a parisshe, or for al a contree.29832
ParsT 899A right so is a wikked preest corrupcioun ynough for al a parisshe, or for al a contree.29832
ParsT 904 The thridde spece of avowtrie is somtyme bitwixe a man and his wyf, and that is29844
ParsT 909 For right so as he that engendreth a child is his flesshly fader, right so is his godfader his fader espiritueel.29854
ParsT 909A For which a womman may in no lasse synne assemblen with hire godsib than with hire owene flesshly brother.29854
ParsT 918 This, as seith the book, is a ful greet sacrement. 29872
ParsT 919 And for to halwen mariage he was at a weddynge, where as he turned water into wyn,29874
ParsT 922 First, for mariage is figured bitwixe Crist and holy chirche. And that oother is for a man is heved of a womman;29882
ParsT 922 First, for mariage is figured bitwixe Crist and holy chirche. And that oother is for a man is heved of a womman;29882
ParsT 923 For if a womman hadde mo men than oon, thanne sholde she have moo hevedes than oon, and29884
ParsT 923A that were an horrible thyng biforn God; and eek a womman ne myghte nat plese to many folk at oones.29884
ParsT 925 Now comth how that a man sholde bere hym with his wif, and namely in two thynges;29888
ParsT 929A as seith Seint Paul, that a man sholde loven his wyf as Crist loved hooly chirche,29896
ParsT 929B that loved it so wel that he deyde for it. So sholde a man for his wyf, if it were nede.29898
ParsT 930 Now how that a womman sholde be subget to hire housbonde, that telleth Seint Peter. First, in obedience.29898
ParsT 931 And eek, as seith the decree, a womman that is wyf, as longe as she is a wyf,29900
ParsT 931 And eek, as seith the decree, a womman that is wyf, as longe as she is a wyf,29900
ParsT 935 It is a greet folye, a womman to have a fair array outward and in hirself be foul inward.29908
ParsT 935 It is a greet folye, a womman to have a fair array outward and in hirself be foul inward.29908
ParsT 935 It is a greet folye, a womman to have a fair array outward and in hirself be foul inward.29908
ParsT 936 A wyf sholde eek be mesurable in lookynge and in berynge and in lawghynge, and discreet in alle hire wordes and hire dedes.29908
ParsT 939 Thanne shal men understonde that for thre thynges a man and his wyf flesshly mowen assemble.29912
ParsT 944 The seconde manere of chastitee is for to been a clene wydewe, 29926
ParsT 946 And certes, if that a wyf koude kepen hire al chaast by licence of hir housbonde,29930
ParsT 946A so that she yeve nevere noon occasion that he agilte, it were to hire a greet merite.29930
ParsT 952 Slepynge longe in greet quiete is eek a greet norice to Leccherie.29942
ParsT 953 Another remedie agayns Leccherie is that a man or a womman eschue the compaignye of hem29942
ParsT 953 Another remedie agayns Leccherie is that a man or a womman eschue the compaignye of hem29942
ParsT 954 Soothly, a whit wal, although it ne brenne noght fully by stikynge of a candele, yet is the wal blak of the leyt.29944
ParsT 954 Soothly, a whit wal, although it ne brenne noght fully by stikynge of a candele, yet is the wal blak of the leyt.29944
ParsT 957 But so heigh a doctrine I lete to divines. Nathelees, I hope to God,29950
ParsT 966 And the preest sholde be enterdited that dide swich a vileynye; to terme of al his lif he sholde namoore synge masse,29970
ParsT 967A for many a wrecche, for to bere compaignye, wol go to the devel of helle.29972
ParsT 973 The sixte circumstaunce is why that a man synneth, as by which temptacioun, and if hymself procure thilke temptacioun,29982
ParsT 973A or by the excitynge of oother folk; or if he synne with a womman by force, or by hire owene assent;29982
ParsT 980 For understond wel that after tyme that a man hath defouled his baptesme by synne,29994
ParsT 981 and namely by the two, if ther be a confessour to which he may shriven hym,29996
ParsT 982 Thanne shal man looke and considere that if he wole maken a trewe and a profitable confessioun, ther moste be foure condiciouns.29998
ParsT 982 Thanne shal man looke and considere that if he wole maken a trewe and a profitable confessioun, ther moste be foure condiciouns.29998
ParsT 992 A man that hath trespased to a lord, and comth for to axe mercy and maken his accord,30016
ParsT 992 A man that hath trespased to a lord, and comth for to axe mercy and maken his accord,30016
ParsT 997 The fifthe signe is that a man or a womman be obeisant to receyven the penaunce that hym is enjoyned for his synnes,30026
ParsT 997 The fifthe signe is that a man or a womman be obeisant to receyven the penaunce that hym is enjoyned for his synnes,30026
ParsT 998A For certes, if a man hadde a deedly wounde, evere the lenger that he taried to warisshe hymself,30028
ParsT 998A For certes, if a man hadde a deedly wounde, evere the lenger that he taried to warisshe hymself,30028
ParsT 999 And right so fareth synne that longe tyme is in a man unshewed. 30030
ParsT 1000 Certes, a man oghte hastily shewen his synnes for manye causes; as for drede of deeth, that cometh ofte sodeynly,30032
ParsT 1003A for wikked haste dooth no profit; and that a man konne shryve hym of his synnes,30038
ParsT 1006 Also thou shalt shryve thee of alle thy synnes to o man, and nat a parcel to o man and a parcel to another;30046
ParsT 1006 Also thou shalt shryve thee of alle thy synnes to o man, and nat a parcel to o man and a parcel to another;30046
ParsT 1007A and therfore outher he foryeveth al parfitly or elles never a deel.30048
ParsT 1009A for to shryve thee to a discreet and an honest preest, where thee liketh, and by licence of thy curaat,30054
ParsT 1015 and that a man ne be nat despeired of the mercy of Jhesu Crist, as Caym or Judas.30066
ParsT 1016 And eek a man moot accusen hymself of his owene trespas, and nat another;30066
ParsT 1017A or the estaat of a persone be swich thurgh which his synne is agregged, or elles that he may nat pleynly shryven30070
ParsT 1023 Thow shalt eek shryve thee to a preest that is discreet to conseille30080
ParsT 1024A as whoso telleth a jape or a tale, but avysely and with greet devocioun.30084
ParsT 1024A as whoso telleth a jape or a tale, but avysely and with greet devocioun.30084
ParsT 1027 And certes, oones a yeere atte leeste wey it is laweful for to been housled, for certes, oones a yeere alle thynges renovellen.30088
ParsT 1027 And certes, oones a yeere atte leeste wey it is laweful for to been housled, for certes, oones a yeere alle thynges renovellen.30088
ParsT 1030 Now been ther thre manere of almesse: contricion of herte, where a man offreth hymself to God;30092
ParsT 1031 And tak kep that a man hath nede of thise thinges generally: he hath nede of foode, he hath nede of clothyng and herberwe,30094
ParsT 1036 For, as witnesseth Seint Mathew, capitulo quinto, " A citee may nat been hyd that is set on a montayne,30102
ParsT 1036 For, as witnesseth Seint Mathew, capitulo quinto, " A citee may nat been hyd that is set on a montayne,30102
ParsT 1036A ne men lighte nat a lanterne and put it under a busshel, 30104
ParsT 1036A ne men lighte nat a lanterne and put it under a busshel, 30104
ParsT 1036B but men sette it on a candle-stikke to yeve light to the men in the hous.30104
ParsT 1039 And ye shul understonde that orisouns or preyeres is for to seyn a pitous wyl of herte,30108
ParsT 1042 and for a man sholde be the lasse wery to seyen it, and for a man may nat excusen hym to lerne it,30114
ParsT 1042 and for a man sholde be the lasse wery to seyen it, and for a man may nat excusen hym to lerne it,30114
ParsT 1045A and alwey a man shal putten his wyl to be subget to the wille of God.30122
ParsT 1049A and in forberynge of deedly synne; this is to seyn, that a man shal kepen hym fro deedly synne with al his myght.30130
ParsT 1051B a man shal nat ete in untyme, ne sitte the lenger at his table to ete for he fasteth.30134
ParsT 1060 Now again the shame that a man hath to shryven hym, 30148
ParsT 1061 agayns that shame sholde a man thynke that, by wey of resoun, that he that hath nat been shamed to doon foule thinges,30150
ParsT 1062 A man sholde eek thynke that God seeth and woot alle his thoghtes and alle his werkes,30152
ParsT 1068A and eek that alle the richesses in this world ben in aventure and passen as a shadwe on the wal;30162
Retr 1087 the book of the Leoun; and many another book, if they were in my remembrance, and many a song30202
Retr 1087A and many a leccherous lay, that Crist for his grete mercy foryeve me the synne.30204